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#170101 12/08/04 10:25 PM
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Quote
Originally posted by Deacon Lance:
I hope Alex doesn't mind but here is a picture of Alex:

http://www.holmesonhomes.com/index....ture&pictureID=1361&galleryID=45
What! No facial hair?!? wink

#170102 12/09/04 01:31 AM
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Originally posted by LaFamiliaFelix:
I asked a former student of mine, who is from Ukraine, what she thought about the current situation in Ukraine. She told me she is a Yanukovich supporter for two reasons. First, she said that Ukraine gets electricity and other basic utilities from Russia, so friends there are necessary. Also, she said that the Russian language would not be made the second official language, and she feels it should be. Are either of these reasons facts? I should point out that this student is from Kiev, but her father is Russian.
Your former student hit the proverbial nail on the head. Russia is attempting to use it's wealth from it's natural resources to subjugate not only Ukraine, but Western Europe.

Contrary to what your former student stated, Ukraine imports little if any electricity from Russia. However, Ukraine imports ALL of it's natural gas and oil from Russia.

Why should Ukraine's carbon fuel purchases from Russia provide a basis for making Russian an official language in Ukraine ?

Russia is the world's leading exporter of natural gas and number two for oil after Saudia Arabia. Most is exported to Western Europe (ie: France & Germany). Using your former student's logic, Russian should be made an official languages in these countries also.

Please ask your student if she feels that Russian should also be an offical language in Western Europe because of their large purchases of carbon fuels from Russia ?

Russia is about to have it's new found wealth in carbon fuels come to an end. The Odesa-Brody pipeline is why Putin is trying to truncate Ukraine. The reverse flow of this pipeline will permit ALL Europeans to enjoy other cheap carbon fuel alternatives from other regions (ie: Caspian Sea countries).

Young Ukrainians have affirmed their right to live and work in Ukrainian. They have reversed generations of colonial Russian rule. Perhaps the Russians wish to help the 4 million ethinic Ukrainian who can't get any support their native language in Russia.

I.F.

#170103 12/09/04 03:33 AM
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Quote
Originally posted by Deacon John Montalvo:
Quote
Originally posted by Deacon Lance:
[b] I hope Alex doesn't mind but here is a picture of Alex:

http://www.holmesonhomes.com/index....ture&pictureID=1361&galleryID=45
What! No facial hair?!? wink [/b]
Yeah, I always pictured Alex as looking more like this.

His Holiness Patriarch Alex biggrin

#170104 12/09/04 02:52 PM
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Dear Father Deacon and Charles,

That whole period of renovation for the TV show was like a close shave in more ways than one . . .

wink

Alex

#170105 12/09/04 05:21 PM
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Jean Francois,
Obviously you are very passionate about the original topic of this thread! However, I think that either my post was unclear, or you misunderstood.
1.)The former student with whom I spoke was interested in Russian being the second language in Ukraine because she is ethnically part Russian. She was concerned that the right to learn Russian in schools might be taken away under Yushenko. This concern was unrelated to the concern about electricity and other resources.
2.)She said that she would not like to see the quality of life in Ukraine (where her grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, etc. still live!) suffer because of a break in diplomatic and/or trade relations with Russia. This is her opinion.
3.)I posted the story and asked if her opinions were indeed based upon factual information because I did not know, not to be argumentative.
4.)I will not ask her any of those questions. She has a right to her own opinion about her country's political situation.

#170106 12/09/04 06:01 PM
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Dear Felix,

Actually, improving the quality of life in Ukraine is what the citizens of Ukraine (Ukrainian, Russian, Carpatho-Rusyn etc.) who are supporters of Yuschenko would like, including all of my extended family and that of my wife's et al.

The best insight into what kind of poverty the people over there are in is to be had by having family members living there and to be actively engaged oneself in sending them parcels.

And that is a whole different world!

Yes, they play the guilt trump card on you, writing letters that make the in-laws cry (my father-in-law is doing less crying these days).

We've had over thirty visits from them over here plus the benefit of many new arrivals on work visas who attend our parishes.

Even the Ukrainian emigre communities have quite the romantic notion about life in Ukraine now . . . as Yuschenko, for one, related at a banquet in his honour two years ago.

To sober us up, I suppose, Yuschenko said that "in Ukraine today, there are children being raised by their grandparents, because their parents can only make a decent wage in Portugal et al."

To declare Ukrainian the official language does NOT mean that language rights of others would be trampled on - it doesn't even mean that Russian wouldn't be used in official documents.

When Ukraine declared its independence in 1918, the declaration was issued in four languages at the same time: Ukrainian, Russian, Polish and Hebrew.

I find it rather odd for this to be raised by Russians who have, for long, supported a policy of Russification of its Eastern European satellites. That policy was in place long before the Bolsheviks took Russia over.

Economically, it just doesn't make sense for Ukraine not to seek close economic ties with the EU and North America. Ukrainians DO see themselves as central Europeans.

In addition, the pro-Russian forces simply have Kuchma and his cronies to blame for the current situation of unrest that has gripped Ukraine (I still rub my eyes in disbelief and ask my Ukrainian friends "Are those really Ukrainians demonstrating?")

This is all about economics and the revolt against gangster capitalism.

To his credit, Yuschenko has followed a solid path toward achieving democratic legitimacy for his party and movement.

Kuchma, his cronies and his family have all become very wealthy.

When poor people see that, it is amazing how many will take to the streets.

A "people's government?" Ah, no . . .

Again, your student should be reassured that her language rights will always be better protected in a democratic Ukraine, than any other's in Russia.

Alex

#170107 12/10/04 01:50 PM
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Dear Friends,

An article appeared in a paper up here by one Neil Barnett on the situation in Ukraine.

Basically, Neil is dead-set against Ukraine moving toward the EU.

Interestingly enough, he quite openly asserts that Kuchma and Yanukovych are all that is said about them. But the people in the east like them because of the social safety net they provide.

An amazing article that defends gangsterism because the people are a little better off etc. But the people in the accompanying photograph and that he talks about are old former communist party members, all wearing not orange or blue/white, but their red medals.

Ah, western journalists . . .

Alex

#170108 12/10/04 04:05 PM
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Who knows, maybe Mr. Barnett has a red medal himself, and if he doesn't, maybe he has just qualified himself in receiving one after the article he has written.
Lauro

#170109 12/10/04 06:33 PM
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This is a good example of how the former Communist countries will evangelize. The faith is strong! And look what they brought to the protests. http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/041207/photos_ts/mdf787108

#170110 12/10/04 06:37 PM
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Hey,

I think this one is kind of like our lives. We think we can hide things from Jesus and they will never be found. I bet that guy was supprised, just like we are when God supprises us by bringing us to confession. Then we get made into a new creation too!

http://www.holmesonhomes.com/index....ture&pictureID=1334&galleryID=45

#170111 12/10/04 06:40 PM
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Dear Pani Rose,

There were all sorts of "rip offs" involved . . . wink

Alex

#170112 12/10/04 06:54 PM
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Well Alex,

It looks like God truly blessed you and made it right!

Pani Rose

#170113 12/22/04 08:29 PM
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As of Wednesday evening, more than 12,000 foreign Observers of the election this coming Sunday have been registered in Kyiv. That's much more than double the number the last time. That should at least discourage the shenanigans of the previous balloting. But there's still room for more observers - anyone wish to go?

Incognitus

#170114 12/22/04 08:48 PM
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Dear Incognitus,

A number of friends of mine here have gone, including Hritzko's brother whom I know.

I was asked if I'd consider going.

I said I would, but I'm just too old for that sort of thing nowadays.

A blessed Feast of the Conception of St Anne!

Alex

#170115 12/22/04 08:55 PM
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Not all who volunteered have been accepted frown

I do know someone who was there for the last round as an official observer and has not benn accepted this time.

I do hope that peace will prevail this time and that the right man wins

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