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Re: Bible Software [Re: Stephanos I] #357581
12/27/10 05:14 PM
12/27/10 05:14 PM
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 89
California
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Systratiotes Offline
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California
Stephanos I,

I have a few Logos apps. In my experience Logos is quite suspicious of those who claim to have changed computers after installing a legally licensed product. Logos apps are softlocked upon registration. The softlock prevents reauthorization of the software license after installing the app to another computer. I perceive that may be the problem you are experiencing.

You might contact Logos customer support and be prepared to insist that you are no pirate. If you have the supporting email receipt from an online purchase, or can scan a paper receipt to PDF, that should make things a lot easier.

On the other point, Aquila, Theodotion and Symmachus were Greek translations which Jerome named to support his argument that the Seventy had become hopelessly corrupted to justify changing the Church's landmarks by using a Hebrew source-text instead. I think Jerome was a bit vainglorious in his arguments, but that is my opinion.

Certainly, Jerome's assetion is difficult to prove as stated.

Hardly anything of Aquila or Symmachus works survives today. What does survive of Aquila's shows it to be a quite wooden Greek; kind of like "Young's Literal Translation" is to English, but more so. It is difficult to see how one whose first language was Greek would have been happy with it. It seems that Aquila's translation was made by a Rabbi to replace the Greek Seventy (LXX) among Jews, not to supplement it among Christians.

Symmachus's translation is represented by even fewer bits than Aquila's. Some have conjectured that it was composed in a more eloquent "good Greek" style. The vast majority of the Greek Seventy is in Koine which was the street level Greek of the day. It is unclear which existing LXX manuscripts may actually show corruption from Symmachus's eloquent "good Greek" translation.

Some LXX portions including Daniel and Judges in the Greek Seventy have alternate translations credited to Theodotion (or perhaps a Pseudo-Theodotion). Some argue that these translations were too early to be credited to the historical Theodotion. In general, Theodotion's are much better translations of the Hebrew than the Old Greek portions they replace. It could be that well meaning churchmen substitued "Theodotion's" translations were they found the original Old Greek unsatisfactory and that Theodotion's translations were more limited than the entire Greek Seventy.

Both Rhalfs' and Swetes' editions contain both Theodotion and Old Greek versions.

Today LXX scholars are aware of Origen's alleged Hexaplaric alterations to the text of the Greek Seventy. Jerome said those corruptions were present and so they are. Would that St. Jerome could have given more helpful detail to this point, but that wasn't his agenda. Scholars today occupy themselves identifying and marking these so-called Hexaplaric revisions. The earliest Syriac manuscripts are helpful in this regard as the Syriac was translated from the Seventy and has many of those Hexaplaric portions marked. The real question often relates to, "How did the text read before Origen?"

Actually, I was assured by a Professor that the manuscript Codex Vatican B has the purest non-Hexaplaric Greek Old Testament. He was probably standing on scholarship not his own, so one is compelled to take his word at face value. I have been unable personaly to establish the veracity of the assertion. Obviously, Vatican B has been quite influential over published editions of the Greek Seventy thus far. So, if the assertation is true, we have some hope that after alleged third century A.D. manipulations of the text, we still have the true Biblical Greek text.

μιχαηλ ο αδελφος σας

Last edited by Systratiotes; 12/27/10 05:16 PM.
Re: Bible Software [Re: Systratiotes] #357583
12/27/10 05:40 PM
12/27/10 05:40 PM
Joined: Feb 2002
Posts: 2,502
West Coast
Stephanos I Offline
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Yes I have just finished a study on the transmission of the texts it was very interesting.
And I was aware that many consider the Codex Vaticanus to be among the best versions.
Stephanos I
Wonder if there are any works using the CV with English translation?

PS Pray for me I am recovering from surgery and it was thus that I had the time in bed to devote for study. At least there were some bennifits. smile

Last edited by Stephanos I; 12/27/10 05:41 PM.
Re: Bible Software [Re: Father Anthony] #357586
12/27/10 06:39 PM
12/27/10 06:39 PM
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Posts: 89
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Systratiotes Offline
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Indeed, One must take opportunities to study whenever the are presented.

I will continue to pray for your continued and complete recovery.

My preferred Greek New Testament is more conservative, but to answer your question, you might try the 1901 ASV New Testament. It is very much like the 1891 ERV and easier to get hold of. That NT is quite like Codex Vaticanus B and the Westcott-Hort Greek New Testament which heavily favors B. Later Alexandrian translations are based on critical editions of Nestle's Greek New Testament.

Both L.C.L. Brenton's 1851 and Charles Thompson's 1808 English translations of the Septuagint seem to be based on Greek LXX texts which were reprinted from Pope Sixtus IV's 1545 edition. The Sixtine LXX represents Codex Vaticanus B suplemented by other Vatican manuscripts where B is incomplete.

μιχαηλ ο αδελφος σας

Last edited by Systratiotes; 12/27/10 06:41 PM.
Re: Bible Software [Re: Systratiotes] #357646
12/29/10 12:08 AM
12/29/10 12:08 AM
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Posts: 2,502
West Coast
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Thanks for the imput.
Stephanos I
AMDG getting stronger every day.

Last edited by Stephanos I; 12/29/10 12:08 AM.
Re: Bible Software [Re: Father Anthony] #357672
12/29/10 12:54 PM
12/29/10 12:54 PM
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Systratiotes Offline
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California
Glad to hear it! Praise God!

Incidentally, I meant "1881 ERV" not "1891 ERV".

I think the 1901 ASV is available for most Bible programs. The ASV is in the Public Domain. For both Bible Explorer and E-Sword it is a free download. Brenton's English translation is freely available for E-Sword and also for Costa Stergiou's "theWord" software.

If you havn't tried latter (see http://www.theword.net/)it may be worth looking at. Mr. Stergiou has engineered a well designed interface and has lots of helpful Bibles and books available for free download. Pretty impressive stuff freely given, well deserving nominal support.


Standard disclaimers.

μιχαηλ της συστρατιωτης

Re: Bible Software [Re: Father Anthony] #357675
12/29/10 01:47 PM
12/29/10 01:47 PM
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Systratiotes Offline
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Also, I would hasten to add that digital editions of the Greek Seventy (LXX) tend to represent A. Rahlfs' 1934 cosmopolitain edition which frequently deviated from the Sixtine Codex Vaticanus B based Greek text used in Brenton's "Greek and English" edition. Rhalfs often printed readings from Codex Alexandrinus but sometimes from Codex Sinaticus or one of a select few minuscule manuscripts instead.

If one has a physical (bound) copy of Rhalf's "Septuaginta" the critical apparatus at the bottom of the pages detail readings from Codex Vaticanus B and other manuscripts when the printed text differs. Rhalfs's apparatus is in Latin and is often omitted from digital editions of Rhalfs' LXX text.

μιχαηλ

Last edited by Systratiotes; 12/29/10 01:48 PM.
Re: Bible Software [Re: Father Anthony] #367302
07/27/11 08:51 PM
07/27/11 08:51 PM
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Posts: 252
Eastern Pennsylvania
bkovacs Offline
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What about http://www.berbible.org/links.php
for starters. Mainly for ESV and NKJV. Not complete, in regards to canon, but good for New Testament and just the text. Plus it's free!.

Re: Bible Software [Re: Father Anthony] #386204
09/13/12 10:22 PM
09/13/12 10:22 PM
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Florida
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Florida
You may want to try the Faith Database. It is a Catholic resource. Not only does it have 10 versions of scripture including the Douay, NAB, KJV, NKJV, NIV, NASB, and others: it also has the early church fathers, papal encyclicals, writings of many christian classics, Catholic Encyclopedia, an apologetics section, and more. It is well worth the $30 dollars to download it to disk and then install it. Go here

http://www.faithdatabase.com/

Re: Bible Software [Re: Father Anthony] #388575
11/29/12 08:56 PM
11/29/12 08:56 PM
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 252
Eastern Pennsylvania
bkovacs Offline
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I would also like to add. eSword for Windows 7 and BibleTime for Ubuntu/Linux/MacOSX. Both offer the DRB and KJV w/Deutercanonicals. Plus you can add for free, many of the Ancient Church Fathers writings and commentaries, via add-on modules to the software.

Re: Bible Software [Re: Father Anthony] #389807
01/11/13 10:26 AM
01/11/13 10:26 AM
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Posts: 12
Athens, Greece
gonesimera Offline
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you also have the Biblia Clerus software that is free.

http://www.clerus.org/bibliaclerus/index_eng.html

READING THE WORD OF GOD WITH THE CHURCH :

This program offers Sacred Scripture, its interpretation in light of Sacred Tradition and the teachings of the Magisterium, with appropriate theological commentary and exegesis.
The downloadable version allows you to connect Sacred Scripture to the complete works of many Doctors of the Church, Councils, Encyclicals, teachings of the Popes, Catechisms, as well as commentaries from secular literature, etc.
Note: At the moment, the content may differ according to the language used. You are invited to expand your inquiry by researching in other languages.

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