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record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole #254814
10/03/07 12:11 AM
10/03/07 12:11 AM
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harmon3110 Offline OP
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Hi Everybody,

Here is more imperative evidence of global warming, this time from the Arctic, as reported by the British newspaper "The Independent." A heatwave took place this summer in the Canadian Arctic, where the temperature was 71.6 degrees Fahrenheit (22 degrees Celsius). Other scientists reported similar dramatic warming and resulting melting of Arctic ice. One scientist reported observing *rain* at the North Pole.

-- John




Quote

Record 22C [71.6 Fahrenheit] temperatures in Arctic heatwave
By Steve Connor, Science Editor
Published: 03 October 2007
http://environment.independent.co.uk/climate_change/article3021309.ece


Parts of the Arctic have experienced an unprecedented heatwave this summer, with one research station in the Canadian High Arctic recording temperatures above 20C, about 15C higher than the long-term average. The high temperatures were accompanied by a dramatic melting of Arctic sea ice in September to the lowest levels ever recorded, a further indication of how sensitive this region of the world is to global warming. Scientists from Queen's University in Ontario watched with amazement as their thermometers touched 22C [note: that is 71.6 degrees Fahrenheit] during their July field expedition at the High Arctic camp on Melville Island, usually one of the coldest places in North America.

"This was exceptional for a place where the normal average temperatures are about 5C. This year we frequently recorded daytime temperatures of between 10C and 15C and on some days it went as high as 22C," said Scott Lamoureux, a professor of geography at Queen's.

"Even temperatures of 15C are higher than we'd expect and yet we recorded them for between 10 and 12 days during July. We won't know the August and September recordings until next year when we go back there but it appears the region has continued to be warm through the summer."

The high temperatures on the island caused catastrophic mudslides as the permafrost on hillsides melted, Professor Lamoureux said. "The landscape was being torn to pieces, literally before our eyes."

Other parts of the Arctic also experienced higher-than-normal temperatures, which indicate that the wider polar region may have experienced its hottest summer on record, according to Walt Meir of the US National Snow and Ice Data Centre in Colorado.

"It's been warm, with temperatures about 3C or 4C above normal for June, July and August, particularly to the north of Siberia where the temperatures have reached between 4C and 5C above average," Dr Meir said.

Unusually clear skies over the Arctic this summer have caused temperatures to rise. More sunlight has exacerbated the loss of sea ice, which fell to a record low of 4.28 million square kilometres (1.65 million square miles), some 39 per cent below the long-term average for the period 1979 to 2000. Dr Meir said: "While the decline of the ice started out fairly slowly in spring and early summer, it accelerated rapidly in July. By mid-August, we had already shattered all previous records for ice extent."

An international team of scientists on board the Polar Stern, a research ship operated by the Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany, also felt the effects of an exceptionally warm Arctic summer. The scientists had anticipated that large areas of the Arctic would be covered by ice with a thickness of about two metres, but found that it had thinned to just one metre.

Instead of breaking through thicker ice at an expected speed of between 1 and 2 knots, the Polar Stern managed to cruise at 6 knots through thin ice and sometimes open water.

"We are in the midst of a phase of dramatic change in the Arctic," said Ursula Schauer, the chief scientist at the Alfred Wegener Institute, who was on board the Polar Stern expedition. "The ice cover of the North Polar Sea is dwindling, the ocean and the atmosphere are becoming steadily warmer, the ocean currents are changing," she said.

One scientist came back from the North Pole and reported that it was raining there, said David Carlson, the director of International Polar Year, the effort to highlight the climate issues of the Arctic and Antarctic. "It makes you wonder whether anyone has ever reported rain at the North Pole before."

Another team of scientists monitoring the movements of Ayles Ice Island off northern Canada reported that it had broken in two far earlier than expected, a further indication of warmer temperatures. And this summer, for the first time, an American sailing boat managed to traverse the North-west Passage from Nova Scotia to Alaska, a voyage usually made by icebreakers. Never before has a sail-powered vessel managed to get straight through the usually ice-blocked sea passage.

Inhabitants of the region are also noticing a significant change as a result of warmer summers, according to Shari Gearheard, a research scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Centre. "People who live in the region are noticing changes in sea ice. The earlier break-up and later freeze-up affect when and where people can go hunting, as well as safety for travel," she said.

Mark Serreze of the National Snow and Ice Data Centre, said: "We may see an ice-free Arctic Ocean in summer within our lifetimes. The implications... are disturbing."

The North-west Passage: an ominous sign

The idea of a North-west Passage was born in 1493, when Pope Alexander VI divided the discovered world between Spain and Portugal, blocking England, France and Holland from a sea route to Asia. As it became clear a passage across Europe was impossible, the ambitious plan was hatched to seek out a route through north-western waters, and nations sent out explorers. When, in the 18th century, James Cook reported that Antarctic icebergs produced fresh water, the view that northern waters were not impossibly frozen was encouraged. In 1776 Cook himself was dispatched by the Admiralty with an Act promising a 20,000 prize, but he failed to push through a route north of Canada. His attempt preceded several British expeditions including a famous Victorian one by Sir John Franklin in 1845. Finally, in 1906 Roald Amundsen led the first trip across the passage to Alaska, and since then a number of fortified ships have followed. On 21 August this year, the North-west Passage was opened to ships not armed with icebreakers for the first time since records began.



Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: harmon3110] #254824
10/03/07 01:28 AM
10/03/07 01:28 AM
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Stephanos I Offline
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Your point being?
Stephanos I

Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: Stephanos I] #254831
10/03/07 03:38 AM
10/03/07 03:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Stephanos I
Your point being?
Stephanos I
Maybe that it's stuffy in here today?

Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: Stephanos I] #254832
10/03/07 05:11 AM
10/03/07 05:11 AM
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harmon3110 Offline OP
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Originally Posted by Stephanos I
Your point being?
Stephanos I


That global warming is real, that it is happening at an accelerated pace, and that urgent action is required now to respond to it.

-- John

Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: harmon3110] #254836
10/03/07 08:25 AM
10/03/07 08:25 AM
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Terry Bohannon Offline
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But that does not mean that it is unprecedented or unnatural. The climate in the Northern Hemisphere was significantly warmer when Leif Eriksson founded a settlement on Greenland than now. Were there cars or globalization to blame?

The earth is warming. What gave us the idea that temperatures were in stasis? (If it's such a shock that it changes, that seems to be an underlining assumption.)

Terry

Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: Terry Bohannon] #254839
10/03/07 09:26 AM
10/03/07 09:26 AM
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Lawrence Offline
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Their were some amazing climatic conditions during the Medieval Warm Period 800 to 1300 that would have provided enough material for Al Gore to write 10 books. Climatic change is nothing new however. With that being said, I'm all for cleaning up our lakes, rivers, forests etc and creating a healthier environment, but I want no part whatsoever of any global initiatives.

Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: Lawrence] #254841
10/03/07 09:54 AM
10/03/07 09:54 AM
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harmon3110 Offline OP
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It. Is. Happening. Now.

The surface of the earth is heating up . . . as evidenced in various places. 71 degrees Fahrenheit in Arctic Canada is just the most recent, dramatic example! The increase in global heat is a fact: regardless of cause or even ideology.

And it will have consequences.

The increase in global heat, in turn, releases liquid water into the oceans and it releases methane and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere (both of which were previously locked in the frozen places of the world). Those materials, in turn, absorb and hold more heat from sunshine and other sources. That extra heat, in turn, melts more of the Arctic -- in Canada, Alaska, Siberia and so on.

One result will be --and already is in some places-- rising sea levels. The result of higher sea levels will be flooded lowlands and costal cities. That will not just be from the higher sea levels. That increased flooding will also come from the extra damage that will be possible from storms produced by and pushing that extra water onshore.

Meanwhile, another result will be changing patterns of rainfall and temperature. They are already changing in some places (like the Rocky Mountains and the South in the U.S.). This will impact agriculture and human populations. For food and for thirst, water could replace petroleum as the liquid gold that people fight over.

Etc.

The time is past for snickering.

The time is come (and is already late) for people to really think this through. We need to build better levees around the cities that are economically worth saving. We need to replan agriculture, transportation systems, and overall economics. We need to pray and fast. And, yes, we even need to examine ruthlessly how our patterns of living might be contributing to this . . . and how it could correct it. For example, simply planting mangrove forests in costal regions (including costal desert regions, such has already been done in Eritrea) can remove carbon from the atmosphere . . . because mangrove trees get the carbon which they use to build themselves from the air, and they are capable of living in salt water as well as fresh water. That is a small thing, but small things can add up to big effects. And so on. We have got to think this through in terms of how we are going to deal with it.

Everything climactic (and thus economic, and thus human) is going to change, remarkably, over the next 50 years. And this recent set of studies shows that the change is happening a lot faster and lot more powerfully than most people anticipated. As Christians, we are supposed to keep the commandment to take care of the earth as a garden. So, we have got to take some of the enormous energy and attention and resources that we spend on other issues and devote some it into getting ready to deal with climate change.

-- John


Last edited by harmon3110; 10/03/07 09:55 AM. Reason: typos
Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: Lawrence] #254844
10/03/07 10:16 AM
10/03/07 10:16 AM
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Terry Bohannon Offline
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Lawrence,

I am in full agreement with you here. The problem I have with the debate as it's framed in the media and by politicians, is that it can fit too well into the rhetoric of class warfare. I suspect that since the fall of the USSR, the intellectuals who supported Marxism, or neo-Marxists, shaped their arguments to the times and began to focus on globalization, rainforests/ozone/climate change (the debate has shifted in the last two decades), and with economic justice in general.

Behind many of the initiatives to "stop global warming" are ideas which root in class warfare and economic justice; America is portrayed as an imperialist and polluting countries like India, China, and Russia are dismissed.

An economic wealthy nation is going to be cleaner and less wasteful than a third world or second tier national economy. They have the economic flexibility to put aside money to the environment. Poor countries do not have that flexibility, nor the level of luxury to be so free with state capital.

Terry

Last edited by Terry Bohannon; 10/03/07 10:20 AM. Reason: [last two sentences]
Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: Terry Bohannon] #254860
10/03/07 11:57 AM
10/03/07 11:57 AM
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Stephanos I Offline
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And you know what your right it is happening NOW just as it Happened THEN without any part of humans!
And if Our Lord God and Savior Jesus Christ doesnt return in all His glory, it will happen again in the future.
Stephanos I
Stop, dont worry! I suggest you read the procedings and find of the Pontifical Academy of Science. They suggest that humanity's impact on global warming is minimal. Don't be high jacked by the agenda driven alarmist.Many of which are new agers with an unscriputal and unchristian views of creation.
That being said, do you think I believe that Christians should be good stewards of God's creation? Most definitely.

Last edited by Stephanos I; 10/03/07 12:04 PM.
Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: Stephanos I] #254871
10/03/07 01:25 PM
10/03/07 01:25 PM
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Logos - Alexis Offline
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I don't think that people are concerned because the earth is heating up...they're not idiots; no one thinks the earth's temperatures have always been "in stasis" as Terry puts it.

The difference between now and other times is that it is happening at a much faster rate than ever before. What usually takes decades or centuries has been accomplished within a mere few years in regards to temperature change.

And we KNOW that greenhouse gases and human pollution ARE part of the reason why the planet's heating up so fast. That is UNDENIABLE. Even if the earth's supposed to heat up, all indications are that it's not supposed to happen anywhere close to the rate it is right now, and the fact that humans are accelerating it at an alarmingly dangerous rate is FACT.

Any time that humans start wielding such a big influence on the temperatue and environment, we should be very worried. It is NOT natural, it is NOT the course the earth would have taken, warming up or not, had we not had a hand in it.

And frankly the fact that so many here seem to flippantly dismiss it out of hand as no big deal is absolutely repulsive, and if you live on the seaboard and your homes and everything you love flood in the next few decades, I won't blame the people who scoff at you and say, "I told you so."

Alexis

Last edited by Logos - Alexis; 10/03/07 01:27 PM.
Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: Logos - Alexis] #254873
10/03/07 02:12 PM
10/03/07 02:12 PM
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It's not that no one thinks such explicitly, but the shock to change begs that question.

I would be moved by scientific opinion if the climate models offered as evidence took into account world precipitation levels to the drop. Until we have that level of understanding there is no way to accurately project a world climate model 100 years into the future.

The arguments offered to the general public by political scientists are too rigidly rooted in false premises to be knowable as objective fact.

Emissions affect air quality. But do our emissions affect world climate as severely as claimed?


"And we KNOW that greenhouse gases and human pollution ARE part of the reason why the planet's heating up so fast. That is UNDENIABLE."

How do we know this?

Last edited by Terry Bohannon; 10/03/07 02:13 PM. Reason: last response
Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: Terry Bohannon] #254874
10/03/07 02:39 PM
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How can we prove that it is happening much faster than before when our records only go back several hundred years in the best of cases?

Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: Robert K] #254880
10/03/07 03:55 PM
10/03/07 03:55 PM
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That's a good question. I think they try to find evidence outside of the human record. The changing of the level of the dead sea to indicate a recent increase of evaporation levels and tree rings to point to dry/wet periods are some of the examples I've heard. There is other support given to the inference that this warming period is unprecedented. But to claim that it's unprecedented and 'our fault' is an arrogant attitude for a scientist to take.

But with billions of dollars appropriated by grants in support of climage research related to "Global Warming" and its effects, it may be some time before peer reviewed literature out of line with the assumptions will be broadly noticed.

Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: Terry Bohannon] #254885
10/03/07 07:16 PM
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There are apparently many and sundry ways to ascertain the rate at which climate has changed in the Earth's past outside of humans sitting and writing down their firsthand experiences of it.

Alexis

Re: record 22C temperatures in the Arctic & rain at the North Pole [Re: Terry Bohannon] #254901
10/03/07 09:03 PM
10/03/07 09:03 PM
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harmon3110 Offline OP
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Originally Posted by Terry Bohannon

Emissions affect air quality. But do our emissions affect world climate as severely as claimed?



A fair question. I'm not a scientist, so I won't comment except to say that most of the world's scientists seem to have concluded that there is a strong correlation between air pollution and global warming. Maybe they are all wrong; I don't know.

But even if man's activities have nothing to do with global warming, global warming is happening now. And there will be consequences. And therefore, I think that we need to think it through and prepare: just like we would for any other kind of threat from nature.

-- John


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