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The Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Japan is inviting all Orthodox Christians to their Christmas 'event' on January 7, 2008.

http://www.stjude.jp/ukr.html


I.F.

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Thanks for the information. I know there are one of maybe even 2 young Ukrainian-Orthodox from the Canadian prairies teaching English in Japan for a few months. I am sure they will be glad to know of a place to celebrate Rizdvo.
I also see from the website there is a yohoo discussion group too.

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The Orthodox Church of Japan is an internationally recognized autonomous Church in World Orthodoxy. I was surprised at seeing this advertised, but then seeing that it's the Kievan Patriarchate, the surprise is no more. The Kievan Patriarchate is not in communion with the Japanese Orthodox Church (the latter of which of course is in full communion with SCOBA).

Christ Is Among Us! Indeed He Is And Ever Shall Be!

Three Cents

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Is anyone willing to translate this for me?

I will be in Japan in April or May of 2008. Thanks!

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To our brethren in the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church:
Інтерв'ю з Патріархом Любомиром (Гузаром), Главою та Отцем Українська Греко-Католицька Церква ( УГКЦ) :

Які на вашу думку передумови того, щоб досягти євхаристійного сопричастя між вірними, які приналежні до Православної та Католицької Церков? Чи необхідним для цього є спільне богослов'я подружжя, filioque, чистилище тощо?

Ні. Наша позиція дуже практична. Ми вважаємо, що у нас нема з православними різниці у вірі. Такі питання як чистилище, Непорочне зачаття, чи filioque є питаннями богослов'я, а не віри. Є різні богословські трактування, але вони лише доповнюючі. В будь-якому випадку, вони не представляють іншої віри. Що стосується сопричастя, то наша позиція ось яка: якщо католик перебуває у місці, де нема католицької церкви, він вільно може йти у православну церкву і отримати там Таїнства. І навпаки, якщо православний не може знайти православного священика, ми йому не відмовляємо у таїнствах, особливо що стосується Св. Сповіді і Св. Причастя....

Розмовляв професор Українського католицького університету Антуан Аржаковський,
(Львів, 26 січня 2004 року)




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The Orthodox Church of Japan is an internationally recognized autonomous Church in World Orthodoxy. I was surprised at seeing this advertised, but then seeing that it's the Kievan Patriarchate, the surprise is no more. The Kievan Patriarchate is not in communion with the Japanese Orthodox Church (the latter of which of course is in full communion with SCOBA).

So what is your point? This announcement is not being advertised but rather is on the web page of this specific church/mission in Japan founded by a group of Ukrainians who are presently living in Japan. There is freedom of religion in Japan and this mission has been established. The priest seems to be an American-Ukrainian:
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Who We Are

Although founded by a group of Ukrainian expatriates, our community is open to people of any nationality. All who come with sincere intent, whether or not they are Orthodox or Christian, are welcome, and all who attend, whether or not they are Ukrainian, will have a good chance to make friends as we worship together according to the ancient Christian tradition, and together explore how to apply the wisdom of Christian teachings to our lives in today's world.

Services are usually in Ukrainian, with portions in English and Japanese. Our priest, Fr. Paul Koroluk, speaks English and Japanese.

Worship Schedule

We are extremely grateful to the Faithful of St. Alban's Anglican Church, and to Bishop Ueda of Tokyo, for allowing us to worship at St. Alban's. God Grant them many years!

Tokyo:

1st and 3rd Sundays of the Month
Divine Liturgy at 1:00 p.m., at St. Alban's in Kamiyacho
(Confession and reading of hours at 12:30 p.m.)

Upcoming Services

2008

Nativity Celebration

Sunday, 06 January - Nativity Vigil (Christmas Eve)
3:00 p.m. - Divine Liturgy
5:00 p.m. - Sviata Vechera Holy Supper
   At St. Alban's

Monday, 07 January - Nativity of our Lord (Christmas!)
10:00 a.m. - Divine Liturgy at St. Alban's

Saturday, 19 January - Theophany
Blessing of Holy Water - TBA

Sunday, 20 January
1:00 p.m. - Divine Liturgy at St. Alban's


I see from their flier that the Ukrainian ambassador to Japan, Mykola Kulinich & his wife are attending the Sviata Vecheria:
http://www.stjude.jp/StJudeHolySupper2008a.pdf

Also, SCOBA is a North American designation and includes bishops of Eastern Orthodox jurisdictions in North America.

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Here goes:

Interview with Patriarch Lubomyr (Husatr) the Primate and Father of the Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church:

Q. In your view, what are the conditions necessary for achieving Eucharistic Communion between the faithful, who are members of the Orthodox and Catholic Churches? Is it not an absolute requirement to have a common theology of marriage, the Filioque, purgatory and the like?

A. No. Our position is very practical. We believe that we do not have any differences with the Orthodox with respect to faith. Questions such as purgatory, the Immaculate Conception or the Filioque are issues of theology, not of faith. There are various theological perspectives, but they are simply complementary. In any event, they do not represent a different faith. With respect to intercommunion, our position is this: If a Catholic is in a place where there is no Catholic church, he may freely go to the Orthodox church and receive the Mysteries there. And, conversely, if an Orthodox cannot find an Orthodox priest, we do not refuse him the Mysteries, especially those of Holy Confession and Holy Communion.

The interviewer was the professor of the Ukrainian Catholic Univeristy, Antoine Arzhakovsky (Lviv, 26 January 2004).

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The point is simple: In the Orthodox Church one cannot set up a jurisdiction in the recognized canonical territory of another Orthodox Church. The is ancient canon law of the Undivided Church.

Ukrainians in Greece are under the the Local Church of Archbishop Christodoulos' Synod. Russians and Ukrainians in Belgrade are under Patriarch Pavel's Synod. Slavs in Albania are under Archbishop Anastasios' Synod. Non-Russian Orthodox Churches in Moscow are under Patriarch Alexy. And so on and so forth.

BTW, the same is true for the Catholic Church. No Catholic group in Communion with Pope Benedict can simply set up a jurisdiction. There is a canonical order in both Churches that must be respected. The is the Faith of the Orthodox! This is the Faith that St. Paul preached in writing to THE Church of Rome, THE Church of Saloniki, etc..

Christ Is Among Us! Indeed He Is And Ever Shall Be!

May Our Heavenly Father Grant Us Peace in 2008.

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The point is simple: In the Orthodox Church one cannot set up a jurisdiction in the recognized canonical territory of another Orthodox Church. The is ancient canon law of the Undivided Church.


Simple, yes; reality, no, and numerous examples can be given of jurisdictional conflicts in recent years in this regard.

Regarding your previous statements about the UOC-KP, past history has shown such as with the Church of Bulgaria and other Orthodox jurisdictions (more recently the OCA) that a church can often be considered "non-canonical" for decades, sometimes centuries, while struggling for autonomy or autocephaly.



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Good Morning Diak:

I feel that you are partially correct in what you are saying with the above two examples.

The Bulgarian Exarchate was created by the Russians (in the Turkish Autonomy) and the Slavic Orthodox Churches maintained Eucharistic Communion with it, even though the Greek Orthodox did not. Thus, the Bulgarian Exarchate was in Communion with the vast majority of Orthodox Christians. The issue was not the rights of the Bulgarian Church within Bulgaria (although there might have been some Greeks who did not want to give up Bulgaria proper), but the concept of extra-terratoriality (which was condemned as Phyletism). The issue was similar to that here. The Bulgarians wanted jurisdiction over their own ethnics outside of Bulgaria, and the Greeks could not accept the loss of jurisdiction in Constantinople. The Bulgarian Exarchate controversy was eventually totally settled by the Ecumenical Patriarch recognizing the autocephaly of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church in Bulgaria and subsequently to the restoration of the Bulgarian Patriarchate.

Nobody broke Eucharistic Communion with the OCA when Moscow granted it a Tomos of Autocephaly (although in fairness, there might have some who threatened to do so, but cooler Christian heads prevailed). The OCA's Autocephaly is considered by her sister SCOBA jurisdictions to be not be binding on them, as opposed to non-Russian churches being in Moscow where the representational churches are clearly guests of the Moscow Patriarchate.

If I may be humbled and honored to use our example, Father Anthony is a priest of the Ecumenical Patriarchate and the OCA's Autocephaly is not jurisdictionally binding upon him. But if he were to travel to Sofia or Moscow, he would clearly be under the jurisdiction of the Local Orthodox Church. This is the SCOBA practice of the OCMC (Orthodox Christian Mission Center), where if a priest travels to Romania or Albania, upon destination arrival they are under the jurisdiction of Patriarch Daniel in Bucharest or Archbishop Anastasios in Tirana.

Brothers and Sisters in Christ, I do not wish to get into a long discussion of Orthodox Church Canon Law (and its Applied History). Examples of exceptions can always be found, and I'm most aware of that. But the point that is I feel is important to be made is that the Canonical Order of the Church exists for the welfare of the building of the Body of Christ (not its schismatic destruction, despite our sinful fallen nature and selfish flesh that gets in the way). If we believe Our Lord and Savior that He would always be with us through the Holy Spirit unto the end of the Ages, then we must accept that He works within His Church to the greater glory of His and Our Heavenly Father.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with us (us mine for you) all! 2 Corinthians 13:13 (NAB) Amen!

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Well said three cents.

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Dear Three Cents and AMM,

Yes, well said.

But the issue of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church struggle for rightful independence from Moscow is a matter of justice, surely?

Yes, no one excommunicated Moscow for declaring its own Patriarchate - no one would dare . . .

The Orthodox Ukrainians I know, including those in my family, would never come under Moscow and those that have been have gotten out to become members of the UGCC in Ukraine.

It is time for the Russian Orthodox Church to face up to its conscience with respect to the Ukrainian ecclesial situation.

Yes, it would be nice for it to address its role in the pseudo-Sobor of 1946, but that doesn't seem likely.

Instead, it should address the historical injustices it committed against its (Mother) Kyivan Orthodox Church and divest its colonial grip on the Orthodox Church in Ukraine so that splintering can stop and true rebuilding of an autocephalous and canonical Ukrainian Orthodox Church with a patriarchate in Kyiv can begin.

This is a national/cultural problem that is made more complicated by the use of religion (as is often the case with such historical struggles).

Can Moscow so readily bestow noncanonical status to a Church that it has dominated and Russified for so long? Does this not bother the collective conscience of world Orthodoxy and individual Orthodox Christians in particular?

If struggle for one's right of autonomy and freedom from ecclesial colonial control is "schismatic," then . . . how blessed such a "schism" must be.

Many Ukrainians look forward to the day when a Ukrainian Orthodox Patriarchate of Kyiv, in communion with its Mother Church of Constantinope (not Moscow) can be accepted as a full member of world Orthodoxy. I would hope that the UGCC could find its way into full communion with that UOC Patriarchate as well.

As Moscow blocks this from occurring (and the UOC-MP bishops have gone on record as declaring their Russian loyalty - which is no surprise), this struggle continues to no one's benefit, except, perhaps, the continuing imperial pretensions of the Moscow Patriarchate.

Alex


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Alex, there are many things I disagree with the MP on, and I am personally a supporter of a unified Ukrainian Church under the Omophorion of the EP. That said, I am not a supporter of the KP, nor do I support their actions in Japan. Nor for that matter do I believe in the aphorism "two wrongs make a right". I see these as different issues.

Also, what they're doing seems very much like the SSJK to me.

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Dear AMM,

O.K., so could you suggest how things should happen, to achieve what we both want for the Orthodox in Ukraine, both from Moscow's side and from the Ukrainians' side?

(And I guess it's because I'm Ukrainian, but isn't the SSJK a traditionalist, reactionary movement and isn't the MP's hanging on to colonial pretensions just that?)

Again, it must be because I'm Ukrainian, so you'll have to forgive me . . .

Alex

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Alex

Originally Posted by Orthodox Catholic
O.K., so could you suggest how things should happen, to achieve what we both want for the Orthodox in Ukraine, both from Moscow's side and from the Ukrainians' side?


The situation in Ukraine is not isolated. What should happen is there should be a re-affirmation in the church that Orthodoxy is not a disparate group of national churches (though of course it acts and looks that way unfortunately all to often), but a unified faith (which it is) that is manifested in various particular churches with distinct identities and cultures. The history that brought things to where they are is probably not worth recounting as most people here know what has happened in Eastern Christendom in the last millenium. So the reality of what should happen is the Orthodox hierarchs should gather to sort out the problem situations in line with the canons. That means Ukraine, Macedonia, Moldova, Western Europe and North America, though now I suppose you could add Japan to the list. On top of that I would say reconcilation with the Old Calendarists and the Old Ritualists needs to happen; as well as a general settling of the calendar issue. This is why when the MP said the internal issues need to be settled first before talking to the Catholics, I very much agreed with the statement.

What unfortunately may continue to happen is propogation of the status quo, and the further spread of confusion and propogation of fringe groups with situations like what is going on in Japan or the unfortunate situation that developed in Blanco.

Quote
(And I guess it's because I'm Ukrainian, but isn't the SSJK a traditionalist, reactionary movement and isn't the MP's hanging on to colonial pretensions just that?)


I am not Ukrainian or Russian, and I'm not a theologian or a church historian. What I see however are two groups with their own agendas (right or wrongly based) who are breaking up the good order of the church in various ways. Maybe the SSJK are a traditionalist, reactionary movement; but maybe they represent traditions people want to maintain and therefore are justified in their defiance. Maybe the MP is hanging on to the vestiges of the Russian Empire, or maybe from their perspective they see a vital link with their heritage (Kievan-Rus) they want to maintain, as well as a substantial constituency in Eastern Ukraine who continues to identify with them culturally and linguistically. In the end, whatever their motivations, I see both groups doing similar things; so I would find support for one but opposition to the other to be odd.

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Dear AMM,

I can live with that. And you are a most articulate and thoughtful person. You should become a theologian - you are one already.

Cheers,

Alex

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