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Thanks for the additional words. There are so many, I would love it if more people posted. We might be able to find some common threads, as the topic implies. Maybe you can help me with these two, which no one else seems to remember or know:

underwear--pronounced GUT-chee

smart aleck (smart a** actually)--pronounced shmut-uh-CUT-uh


Any ideas? Anything strike anyone similar?

The one about the Uncle you feared is close to "stara," which means old. Grandfather I've heard as "staraotec." Old-father. And, of course, the famous where I'm from--Starababa. Old-woman. This one was not used face to face against someone unless you knew some ancient, crippling form of martial arts. Very naughty and sure to start a fight. Note--the "r" is normally pronounced more like a "d" So phonetically it was "studda-bubuh." So if the person in front of you is driving too slowly or could barely see over the steering wheel, they were driving like a starababa.

Let's keep it going.

Tim


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Greetings from a newbie. I've been prowling around these forums for some time now, and I finally decided to join them. I'm from North Dakota, and I was in college before I even knew there was anything Catholic beyond the Roman Catholic Rite. We have three Eastern Rite Churches in ND and I'm over 300 miles from the closest one. As far as Orthodox Churches go, I have no idea if there are any in ND or not.

I've been learning quite a bit from this thread, but I wish you would expand to cover abbreviations and acronyms too. I've figured out "RC" and "RCC" mean "Roman Catholic". "DL" means "Divine Liturgy" (Mass to us of the RCC), "EC" means "Eastern Church", "EOC" means "Eastern Orthodox Church" (presumably not in communion with Rome), and "GOAA" is "Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America" (not in communion with Rome?). But what about "UGCC" and "ACROD"? Some people are helpful in adding things like "Orthodox Christian in Communion with the Church of Rome" so I know where I stand with them, but to me it's sometimes confusing.

I want to thank all of you for teaching me more about my Catholic heritage. I find the more I know about the "Eastern" rites, the better I understand my own "Roman" rite.

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UGCC - Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church (Orthodox in communion with Rome)

ACROD - American Carpatho-Greek Catholic Russian Orthodox Diocese
(Orthodox under the Greek Patriarch of Constantinople)

Last edited by Elizabeth Maria; 01/16/08 02:09 PM.
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Originally Posted by Elizabeth Maria
UGCC - Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church (Orthodox in communion with Rome)

ACROD - American Carpatho-Greek Catholic Russian Orthodox Diocese
(Orthodox under the Greek Patriarch of Constantinople)


ACROD- American Carpatho-Russian (i.e. Rusyn) Orthodox Diocese,

the American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church,

first called the American Carpatho-Russian Greek Catholic Church of the Eastern Rite.

Ung


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Christos Kreshchjajetsja! (Christ is Baptized!)
Vo Jordani! (In the Jordan!)

Welcome Raymond! Good to have you on board. Thanks for joining and I hope you stick around for a very, very long time. I'm so glad when someone joins and speaks up about anything. Those of us that have been here for a while, and I'm a relative new comer myself compared to those who have been here for years, quite often forget that not everyone speaks the same language or knows the abbreviations we do. So a question such as yours is wonderful. Keep asking questions!

I will try to remember this in the future. Which is why I put the tradition Theophany greeting in both Slavonic and English at the top of this post. Don't be afraid to ask anything. We all want the same thing--to learn more about ourselves and our religion. So everyone's viewpoint is important and you can bring up a point that no one has thought of. Sometimes we are too close to the trees to see the forest.

Browse around, have fun, don't take things (or people) too seriously and ask, ask and ask more! Private mails are quite acceptable if there's a question you don't want posted for everyone. Never be afraid to use that route.

Thanks for joining,

Tim


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I remember a few of these from my childhood. There was something like "Check-it" which I think meant wait. My grandmother would repeat it a few times while glaring at you. It could mean wait until I get you home, or it could mean wait until you're older, then you'll understand. Or maybe it was more like "check-eye"

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Originally Posted by BinghamtonNYRosic
I remember a few of these from my childhood. There was something like "Check-it" which I think meant wait. My grandmother would repeat it a few times while glaring at you. It could mean wait until I get you home, or it could mean wait until you're older, then you'll understand. Or maybe it was more like "check-eye"


The Pennsylvania Dutch version is "quit your brutszin!"

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It is Czekaj in Polish. Or cekaj in Slovak, though cakaj is literary Slovak. It does mean wait.

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