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Pew Study on American Religion
#280253 02/26/08 01:40 PM
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The Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life just released its finding from a new, huge study on Americna religious affiliation in America.

See http://religions.pewforum.org/reports

( The full report, at over 140 pages, is available at http://religions.pewforum.org/pdf/report-religious-landscape-study-full.pdf )

I haven't read the full report yet, but here is the summary from the Pew Forum's website.

-- John

Quote

An extensive new survey by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life details the religious affiliation of the American public and explores the shifts taking place in the U.S. religious landscape. Based on interviews with more than 35,000 Americans age 18 and older, the U.S. Religious Landscape Survey finds that religious affiliation in the U.S. is both very diverse and extremely fluid.

More than one-quarter of American adults (28%) have left the faith in which they were raised in favor of another religion - or no religion at all. If change in affiliation from one type of Protestantism to another is included, 44% of adults have either switched religious affiliation, moved from being unaffiliated with any religion to being affiliated with a particular faith, or dropped any connection to a specific religious tradition altogether.

The survey finds that the number of people who say they are unaffiliated with any particular faith today (16.1%) is more than double the number who say they were not affiliated with any particular religion as children. Among Americans ages 18-29, one-in-four say they are not currently affiliated with any particular religion.

The Landscape Survey confirms that the United States is on the verge of becoming a minority Protestant country; the number of Americans who report that they are members of Protestant denominations now stands at barely 51%. Moreover, the Protestant population is characterized by significant internal diversity and fragmentation, encompassing hundreds of different denominations loosely grouped around three fairly distinct religious traditions - evangelical Protestant churches (26.3% of the overall adult population), mainline Protestant churches (18.1%) and historically black Protestant churches (6.9%).

While those Americans who are unaffiliated with any particular religion have seen the greatest growth in numbers as a result of changes in affiliation, Catholicism has experienced the greatest net losses as a result of affiliation changes. While nearly one-in-three Americans (31%) were raised in the Catholic faith, today fewer than one-in-four (24%) describe themselves as Catholic. These losses would have been even more pronounced were it not for the offsetting impact of immigration. The Landscape Survey finds that among the foreign-born adult population, Catholics outnumber Protestants by nearly a two-to-one margin (46% Catholic vs. 24% Protestant); among native-born Americans, on the other hand, Protestants outnumber Catholics by an even larger margin (55% Protestant vs. 21% Catholic). Immigrants are also disproportionately represented among several world religions in the U.S., including Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism.

Although there are about half as many Catholics in the U.S. as Protestants, the number of Catholics nearly rivals the number of members of evangelical Protestant churches and far exceeds the number of members of both mainline Protestant churches and historically black Protestant churches. The U.S. also includes a significant number of members of the third major branch of global Christianity - Orthodoxy - whose adherents now account for 0.6% of the U.S. adult population. American Christianity also includes sizeable numbers of Mormons (1.7% of the adult population), Jehovah's Witnesses (0.7%) and other Christian groups (0.3%).

Like the other major groups, people who are unaffiliated with any particular religion (16.1%) also exhibit remarkable internal diversity. Although one-quarter of this group consists of those who describe themselves as either atheist or agnostic (1.6% and 2.4% of the adult population overall, respectively), the majority of the unaffiliated population (12.1% of the adult population overall) is made up of people who simply describe their religion as "nothing in particular." This group, in turn, is fairly evenly divided between the "secular unaffiliated," that is, those who say that religion is not important in their lives (6.3% of the adult population), and the "religious unaffiliated," that is, those who say that religion is either somewhat important or very important in their lives (5.8% of the overall adult population).

Even smaller religions in the U.S. reflect considerable internal diversity. For instance, most Jews (1.7% of the overall adult population) identify with one of three major groups: Reform, Conservative or Orthodox Judaism. Similarly, more than half of Buddhists (0.7% of the overall adult population) belong to one of three major groups within Buddhism: Zen, Theravada or Tibetan Buddhism. Muslims (0.6% of the overall adult population) divide primarily into two major groups: Sunni and Shia.

The survey finds that constant movement characterizes the American religious marketplace, as every major religious group is simultaneously gaining and losing adherents. Those that are growing as a result of religious change are simply gaining new members at a faster rate than they are losing members. Conversely, those that are declining in number because of religious change simply are not attracting enough new members to offset the number of adherents who are leaving those particular faiths.

To illustrate this point, one need only look at the biggest gainer in this religious competition - the unaffiliated group. People moving into the unaffiliated category outnumber those moving out of the unaffiliated group by more than a three-to-one margin. At the same time, however, a substantial number of people (nearly 4% of the overall adult population) say that as children they were unaffiliated with any particular religion but have since come to identify with a religious group. This means that more than half of people who were unaffiliated with any particular religion as a child now say that they are associated with a religious group. In short, the Landscape Survey shows that the unaffiliated population has grown despite having one of the lowest retention rates of all "religious" groups.

Another example of the dynamism of the American religious scene is the experience of the Catholic Church. Other surveys - such as the General Social Surveys, conducted by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago since 1972 - find that the Catholic share of the U.S. adult population has held fairly steady in recent decades at around 25%. What this apparent stability obscures, however, is the large number of people who have left the Catholic Church. Approximately one-third of the survey respondents who say they were raised Catholic no longer describe themselves as Catholic. This means that roughly 10% of all Americans are former Catholics. These losses, however, have been partly offset by the number of people who have changed their affiliation to Catholicism (2.6% of the adult population) but more importantly by the disproportionately high number of Catholics among immigrants to the U.S. The result is that the overall percentage of the population that identifies as Catholic has remained fairly stable.

In addition to detailing the current religious makeup of the U.S. and describing the dynamic changes in religious affiliation, the findings from the Landscape Survey also provide important clues about the future direction of religious affiliation in the U.S. By detailing the age distribution of different religious groups, for instance, the survey findings show that more than six-in-ten Americans age 70 and older (62%) are Protestant but that this number is only about four-in-ten (43%) among Americans ages 18-29. Conversely, young adults ages 18-29 are much more likely than those age 70 and older to say that they are not affiliated with any particular religion (25% vs. 8%). If these generational patterns persist, recent declines in the number of Protestants and growth in the size of the unaffiliated population may continue.

Major changes in the makeup of American Catholicism also loom on the horizon. Latinos, who already account for roughly one-in-three adult Catholics overall, may account for an even larger share of U.S. Catholics in the future. For while Latinos represent roughly one-in-eight U.S. Catholics age 70 and older (12%), they account for nearly half of all Catholics ages 18-29 (45%).

Finally, the Landscape Survey documents how immigration is adding even more diversity to the American religious quilt. For example, Muslims, roughly two-thirds of whom are immigrants, now account for roughly 0.6% of the U.S. adult population; and Hindus, more than eight-in-ten of whom are foreign born, now account for approximately 0.4% of the population.

Other highlights in the report include

Men are significantly more likely than women to claim no religious affiliation. Nearly one-in-five men say they have no formal religious affiliation, compared with roughly 13% of women.

Among people who are married, nearly four-in-ten (37%) are married to a spouse with a different religious affiliation. (This figure includes Protestants who are married to another Protestant from a different denominational family, such as a Baptist who is married to a Methodist.) Hindus and Mormons are the most likely to be married (78% and 71%, respectively) and to be married to someone of the same religion (90% and 83%, respectively).

Mormons and Muslims are the groups with the largest families; more than one-in-five Mormon adults and 15% of Muslim adults in the U.S. have three or more children living at home.

The Midwest most closely resembles the religious makeup of the overall population. The South, by a wide margin, has the heaviest concentration of members of evangelical Protestant churches. The Northeast has the greatest concentration of Catholics, and the West has the largest proportion of unaffiliated people, including the largest proportion of atheists and agnostics.

Of all the major racial and ethnic groups in the United States, black Americans are the most likely to report a formal religious affiliation. Even among those blacks who are unaffiliated, three-in-four belong to the "religious unaffiliated" category (that is, they say that religion is either somewhat or very important in their lives), compared with slightly more than one-third of the unaffiliated population overall.

Nearly half of Hindus in the U.S., one-third of Jews and a quarter of Buddhists have obtained post-graduate education, compared with only about one-in-ten of the adult population overall. Hindus and Jews are also much more likely than other groups to report high income levels.

People not affiliated with any particular religion stand out for their relative youth compared with other religious traditions. Among the unaffiliated, 31% are under age 30 and 71% are under age 50. Comparable numbers for the overall adult population are 20% and 59%, respectively.

By contrast, members of mainline Protestant churches and Jews are older, on average, than members of other groups. Roughly half of Jews and members of mainline churches are age 50 and older, compared with approximately four-in-ten American adults overall.

In sharp contrast to Islam and Hinduism, Buddhism in the U.S. is primarily made up of native-born adherents, whites and converts. Only one-in-three American Buddhists describe their race as Asian, while nearly three-in-four Buddhists say they are converts to Buddhism.

Jehovah's Witnesses have the lowest retention rate of any religious tradition. Only 37% of all those who say they were raised as Jehovah's Witnesses still identify themselves as Jehovah's Witnesses.

Members of Baptist churches account for one-third of all Protestants and close to one-fifth of the total U.S. adult population. Baptists also account for nearly two-thirds of members of historically black Protestant churches.

These are some of the key findings of the Pew Forum's U.S. Religious Landscape Survey, which draws primarily on a new nationwide survey conducted from May 8 to Aug. 13, 2007, among a representative sample of more than 35,000 adults in the U.S., with additional over-samples of Eastern Orthodox Christians, Buddhists and Hindus. The study also takes advantage of the 2007 survey of American Muslims ("Muslim Americans: Middle Class and Mostly Mainstream"), which was conducted by the Forum in partnership with its sister projects, the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, the Pew Hispanic Center and the Pew Global Attitudes Project. In total, these surveys included interviews with more than 36,000 Americans.

























Re: Pew Study on American Religion
harmon3110 #280449 02/27/08 12:22 PM
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I'm still making my way through this study, but so far it is confirming several things that I have personally observed or thought:

-- In American religion, the biggest growth (in overall numbers, not percentage change) is in three areas: the Evangelicals, the Catholics and the non-religious.

-- While the total percentage of the population of Catholics has remained constant (about 24-25%), many Catholics have left their Church. However, the Catholic Church's constant percentage of the population is partly because of conversion and mostly because of immigration of Catholics from traditionally Catholic countries.

-- 1 out of 10 Protestants used to be a Catholic.

-- Nevertheless, the Catholic Church retains a high percentage of its members when they grow up (68%).

-- "Mainline" Protestant Churches are collapsing in membership, while Evangelical Churches are bursting with growth.

-- The number of Orthodox in America is, according to this study, about 2 million people: or, about .6% of the population.

-- The non-religious are a diverse group. They are estimated to be 16% of the current American population. However, about 1/3 of them describe themselves as religious (they just aren't affiliated with any group); another 1/3 do not describe themselves as religious at all, and less than 1/3 describe themselves as atheist or agnostic. In other words, the unaffiliated represent a curve of degrees of disassociation from religion.

Here are some other findings:

Unsurprisingly, it is the young who least identify with a religion, and it is middle aged and older people who most identify with a religion.

Interestingly the study did not look at religious behavior. In other words, it did not try to gauge how often (or how well) people practice their religion. Instead, it focused on which religions people claim to belong to, now and in the past.

Also, immigration is shaping American religion. (See pages 47 - 53 of the report, which is pages 50-56 of the pdf file.) 38% of American Orthodox are immigrants, mostly from Eastern Europe and the Middle East. (See page 52/55.)

Members of Historically Black Churches and Evangelicals tend to be the less educated than other groups (with 59% and 56%, respectively, having a high school education or less). The most educated (measured by percentage who have a post-college graduate degree) are Hindus (48%), Jews (35%), Buddhists (26%), Atheists (21%), Agnostics (20%) and Orthodox Christians (18%). (See page 56 of the report / page 59 of the pdf document.)

Unsurprisingly, more women than men are members of the Church. Interestingly, more men than women are members of non-Christian religions or nothing at all.

Fascinatingly, people who have never been married are disproportionately unaffiliated with any religion. 28% of the unaffiliated were never married, while only 19% of the general population is never married. (See page 67 / 70.)

Mormons and Muslims have the largest families. (See page 68/71.)

-- John

Re: Pew Study on American Religion
harmon3110 #280460 02/27/08 02:19 PM
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Quote

Interestingly the study did not look at religious behavior. In other words, it did not try to gauge how often (or how well) people practice their religion. Instead, it focused on which religions people claim to belong to, now and in the past.


I think this would have been the most interesting thing to study. As a former Evangelical, I suspect the difference between the various traditions could be startling. Someone could call themselves Catholic and go to Mass once a year or less. But it is a rare thing for someone to call themselves Evangelical unless they go to church services regularly.

Furthermore, I would be interested to see the connection, for example, between:

- church attendance and divorce rates
- church attendance and acceptance of church doctrines
- church attendance and political preferences

Re: Pew Study on American Religion
#280799 02/29/08 08:52 PM
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Pew survey shows America's vast Catholic exodus
Quote
Feb. 27, 2008 (CWNews.com) - One out of every ten adult Americans is a lapsed Catholic. From the Catholic perspective that is the most striking statistic among the many furnished in a "Religious Landscape Survey" by the Pew Forum.

Catholics still constitute the single largest religious denomination in the US, accounting for 23.9% of the adult population. (Evangelical churches, taken as a group, are home to 26.3% of the American people; but they are divided among the different Protestant denominations.) Baptists run a distant second, with 12.7%. If they qualified as a separate denomination, the Americans who have deserted the Catholic Church of their childhood would constitute the third-largest religious group in the country, with 10.1% of the population.

The Pew study, based on exhaustive polling, found that Americans switch their religious affiliations frequently. About 44% of adult Americans now belong to a church different from the one in which they were raised. The Religious Landscape Survey shows that mainline Protestant churches have suffered the most severe losses, and Protestants are now barely clinging to their majority status, with 51% of the population. The largest gains show up, ominously, in the "unaffiliated" category, which now accounts for 16% of America's increasingly secularized people.

...

Statistics can be manipulated, but in the short time since the Pew study appeared, I have seen no serious criticism of its methodology. On the contrary, the Religious Landscape Survey appears to be a thoroughly professional study, conducted on an enormous sample group, using the best accepted polling practices.

The numbers do not lie. American Catholicism is facing a crisis. The sooner we recognize that fact, the sooner we can plot our response.


There is more to the story. I believe this applies to the BCC as well. If the numbers are correct then the BCC members lost would have greatly increase the OC numbers. We know that the OC numbers have been inflated as well. So, where have the Ex-BCC members gone? My guess is the Evangelical Protestant Churches or they aren't going to Church at all.

What do you think?

Last edited by Ray S.; 02/29/08 08:53 PM.
Re: Pew Study on American Religion
Ray S. #280803 02/29/08 09:20 PM
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The study also shows that the newest growing group 'unaffiliated' at 16% loses more members than any other 44% - so there is hope!

Regarding the term 'evangelical' - I think the term is very loose and therefore people of varying religiousity use the term regarding themselves. In blue-state Catholic circles, "evangelical" is derogatory; whereas in the South, everyone is "evangelical" (including some Catholics); on the other hand, the label doesn't insure attendance at a church or that the person practices their self-proclaimed faith.

Re: Pew Study on American Religion
Michael_Thoma #280817 02/29/08 10:43 PM
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I personally know some ex-Byzantine Catholics (Melkites and Maronites) who joined the congregational churches. Sadly, every summer they travel to Israel, Lebanon, and Syria to convert the Catholic and Orthodox Christians to protestantism.

Lake Avenue Congregational Church in Pasadena has a lot of ex-Catholics in their midst.

Last edited by Elizabeth Maria; 02/29/08 10:44 PM.
Re: Pew Study on American Religion
Elizabeth Maria #280851 03/01/08 02:28 AM
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I personally know some ex-Byzantine Catholics (Melkites and Maronites) who joined the congregational churches.


I believe this is the case. I truly don't think most on this forum understand the magnitude of the mass exodus from the BCC. I think most here think because of their ethnic make up they naturally became Orthodox or are going to a RCC and are ok with their decisions. However, the numbers don't add up. I don't think members on this forum can grasp the concept that these people would leave their heritage to join a very foreign Evangelical Protestant Church.

From the little I know it seems that is just what has happened. If we don't wake up and take some action I am afraid there won't be a church left to fight for.

Please note this isn't an attack on anyone here and shouldn't be read as a derogatory comment. This is just how I see what has happen. I look forward to see what others think.

Last edited by Ray S.; 03/01/08 02:29 AM.
Re: Pew Study on American Religion
Ray S. #280854 03/01/08 02:36 AM
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The ones that left the Maronite and Melkite churches claimed that when they asked for Bible Study, the priest refused. So, they went over to the Congregational Church for the Bible Studies and soon, they liked the socialization and joined that church.

When I asked them about not receiving Holy Communion, they responded that they had their monthly communion service and that that was sufficient. When I mentioned the lack of Apostolic Succession, they mentioned that at their Chrismation they became priest, prophet and king.

They gave me all their icons and crosses to pass out to others and then terminated any contact with me.

Re: Pew Study on American Religion
Elizabeth Maria #280855 03/01/08 02:45 AM
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I work with an Ex-BCC who goes to an Evangelical Church. I have not had the opportunity to ask him why he left the "Truth Faith."

I don't many people including the clergy realize what is really happening. That is just my opinion.

Re: Pew Study on American Religion
Elizabeth Maria #280887 03/01/08 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Elizabeth Maria
The ones that left the Maronite and Melkite churches claimed that when they asked for Bible Study, the priest refused. So, they went over to the Congregational Church for the Bible Studies and soon, they liked the socialization and joined that church.

When I asked them about not receiving Holy Communion, they responded that they had their monthly communion service and that that was sufficient. When I mentioned the lack of Apostolic Succession, they mentioned that at their Chrismation they became priest, prophet and king.

They gave me all their icons and crosses to pass out to others and then terminated any contact with me.



Interesting post.

I've spoken with some ex-Roman Catholics, from time to time, who had converted to Evangelical Protestant Christianity. Usually they had been so poorly catechized that they wouldn't even know the term "apostolic succession."

However, like the people you spoke with, they rejected the gist of apostolic succession. The way they put it, they were tired of having to tell their sins to a priest. They didn't like the Church making rules about "everything." And, they found the worship and socializing at the Evangelical churches to be immensely more appealing.

On that last point, they do not strike me as people who want to be entertained, as I have heard Catholics so often (and so bitterly) complain. (I'm not saying that you said that, Elizabeth. I'm saying that I hear it often, in general from Catholics, when this topic comes up.)

Instead, judging from what I have heard, it seems that those who left the Catholic Church for Evangelical Churches were bored out of their minds at Mass. Or, they found Mass to be pointless and meaningless. For them, Mass was standing up and sitting down and kneeling a little; it was doing and saying the same things every week; but there was little feeling or knowledge why.

Please note, these converts out of Catholicism never mentioned the Real Presence in the Eucharist to me. When I asked them about it, they had some very interesting things to say.

First, they said that they really didn't encounter Jesus Christ in the Eucharist or, if they did, it wasn't very powerful or consistent.

Second, when they tried to express their dissatisfaction with other Catholics (including their pastors), they were often not understood. Sometimes it was because no one really listened. Mostly, however, people did listen. Instead, the problem was that these other people couldn't understand. They believed or experienced the Eucharist so strongly that they could not comprehend not believing or feeling that way. It wasn't an issue of communication; it was an issue of two groups of people having two very different experiences with the same thing. One group encountered Christ in the Eucharist -- powerfully, life-changingly-- and the other group did not.

In other words, the Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church, and so on stress that the Eucharist is the primarily way to experience Communion: with Christ and with others. In those churches, the Eucharist is the main, most powerful way to experience the Real Presence of Christ. Many people in those churches do experience that. But, many people don't. And not surprisingly: those who don't experience Him in the Eucharist, but who still believe in Christ, look for another church to better encounter Him.

It is important to emphasize this. They were not leaving the Real Presence of Christ. They were trying to find the Real Presence of Christ. Specifically, they were trying to find a more powerful and consistent experience of Christ -- which they were not getting at Catholic Mass. Otherwise, they would not have joined another church. (They would have stopped being religious or they would have join a different religion.)

It was at the Evangelical Church that they experienced the Real Presence of Christ. The mix of prayer, singing, socializing and study worked for them. Thereby, they found Him: either for the first time in their lives or for the first time in a way that was consistent and vivifying and life-changing. In short, the Catholic Eucharist did not give them a sense of Communion, but prayer, singing, socializing and study did give them a sense (or a better sense) of Communion.

If I may be so bold, the causes seem rather obvious. The Roman Catholic Church (at least in America) has stripped a sense of Mystery from its Liturgy. It has failed to teach faith in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist. It has failed to convincingly teach apostolic succession and authority. And it has had an abysmal overall effort at catechesis. Instead, there is a vague tradition of weekly formal worship and a vague individualized understanding of the Gospel.

The result? The Roman Catholic Church (at least in many places in America) has succeeded in making itself --in effect-- into a Mainline Protestant Church. And like the other Mainline Protestant Churches, it is losing members: either to secularism or to evangelicalism.

Significantly, the most spiritually meaningful moment at Mass for most people, judging from the faces of most of the participants whom I have seen, is holding hands during the Our Father. That seems to be most people's most visceral sense of Communion. In other words, for many people at Mass, Communion is no longer the Eucharist. Is it any wonder, then, that people leave for a better, more effective form of Protestant Christianity?

-- John


Re: Pew Study on American Religion
harmon3110 #280901 03/01/08 02:47 PM
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John, I think that these poor souls, who are actually searching for the Lord, have not yet seen that a relationship with Christ is not based on "emotion" or "feeling," -- they did not "find" or "experience" Christ in the Holy Eucharist, so they looked elsewhere. If one truly has studied, understands, and believes what the Holy Catholic Church teaches, then one believes and trusts in FAITH. If these good people are truly seeking the Lord, as you say they believe themselves to be, then they will find themselves eventually returning to the Lord in His Holy Church. Sometimes the Lord allows us to make great mistakes to find Him... but have no doubt, the Lord, Who is the Good Shepherd, is seeking them out and longs to bring them back into His Fold.

Re: Pew Study on American Religion
harmon3110 #280917 03/01/08 04:57 PM
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Originally Posted by harmon3110
It is important to emphasize this. They were not leaving the Real Presence of Christ. They were trying to find the Real Presence of Christ. Specifically, they were trying to find a more powerful and consistent experience of Christ -- which they were not getting at Catholic Mass. Otherwise, they would not have joined another church. (They would have stopped being religious or they would have join a different religion.)

It was at the Evangelical Church that they experienced the Real Presence of Christ. The mix of prayer, singing, socializing and study worked for them. Thereby, they found Him: either for the first time in their lives or for the first time in a way that was consistent and vivifying and life-changing. In short, the Catholic Eucharist did not give them a sense of Communion, but prayer, singing, socializing and study did give them a sense (or a better sense) of Communion.

If I may be so bold, the causes seem rather obvious. The Roman Catholic Church (at least in America) has stripped a sense of Mystery from its Liturgy. It has failed to teach faith in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist. It has failed to convincingly teach apostolic succession and authority. And it has had an abysmal overall effort at catechesis. Instead, there is a vague tradition of weekly formal worship and a vague individualized understanding of the Gospel.

The result? The Roman Catholic Church (at least in many places in America) has succeeded in making itself --in effect-- into a Mainline Protestant Church. And like the other Mainline Protestant Churches, it is losing members: either to secularism or to evangelicalism.

Significantly, the most spiritually meaningful moment at Mass for most people, judging from the faces of most of the participants whom I have seen, is holding hands during the Our Father. That seems to be most people's most visceral sense of Communion. In other words, for many people at Mass, Communion is no longer the Eucharist. Is it any wonder, then, that people leave for a better, more effective form of Protestant Christianity?

-- John



John,

I believe I agree with you, especially with the part I've quoted above. I believe that many sincere people have left the Roman Catholic Church precisely because it has imitated Protestantism too much and have done it not in a very productive way. While, at the same time, they failed to retain the sence of reverence that is best demonstrated in true Catholic and Orthodox worship. For me Eastern Catholicism has generally retained the best of the sense of reverence. Yet, I must say, that for people weened on Capitalism and in many cases a poor demonstration of the NO we are an acquired taste and not one that most are patient enough to receive.

If we alert and sensitive to the Spirit many wandering RCs will find their way to our Church if we will invite them and help them find their way through our "strange" liturgy and practices. But for most, if the RC Church is to retain these people there must be a growing number of faithful priests who aren't themselves Cafeteria Catholics who will uphold the venerable teachings of the Church and return a sense of reverence to the Mass. There are some signs that this is happening but not enough to tip the scales.

It's surprising that we repeat this inattentive behavior over and over again and need so many revivals and suffer so many reforms but there you have it.

CDL

Re: Pew Study on American Religion
Carson Daniel #280920 03/01/08 05:33 PM
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There are also those who claim to belong to more than one denom.. claims to be trans-denominational - there's a woman I know who is born and raised Orthodox, went to theological studies in a Presbyterian institute, and now claims to be a Presbyterian elder - while still retaining membership in the Orthodox Church, I'm not sure if her priest knows this. She doesn't find any contradiction in this duality - I can't not see the contradiction!

Re: Pew Study on American Religion
Michael_Thoma #280928 03/01/08 06:16 PM
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John, I think you have hit the nail on the head.


Re: Pew Study on American Religion
Elizabeth Maria #280931 03/01/08 06:32 PM
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John, I think you have hit the nail on the head.


That is just part of the story. How do you explain the mass exodus of BCC's?

Unless they left the BCC became RCC then became Evangelical.

Last edited by Ray S.; 03/01/08 06:32 PM.
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