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Could someone please give me a complete list of all churches of the East (Eastern and Oriental)? I tried to obtain it through Wikipedia, but I found it confused and I think it's not updated.

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Originally Posted by Philippe Gebara
Could someone please give me a complete list of all churches of the East (Eastern and Oriental)? I tried to obtain it through Wikipedia, but I found it confused and I think it's not updated.


Shlomo Phillippe,

Here is the list I have. Also here is a link to CNEWA with the 2008 statistics.

Catholic

Albanian Greek Catholic Church
Armenian Catholic Church
Belarusian Greek Catholic Church
Bulgarian Catholic Church
Chaldean/Assyrian Catholic Church
Coptic Catholic Church
Croatian Greek Catholic Church
Ethiopian Catholic Church
Georgian Catholic Church
Greek Catholic Church
Hungarian Greek Catholic Church
Italo-Albanian Greek Catholic Church
Macedonian Catholic Church
Maronite Church
Melkite Catholic Church
Romanian Catholic Church
Russian Catholic Church
Ruthenian Catholic Church
Slovak Greek Catholic Church
Syriac Catholic Church
Syro-Malabar Church
Syro-Malankara Catholic Church
Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church

Oriental Orthodox Churches

Coptic Orthodox Church
Syriac Orthodox Church
Jacobite Syrian Christian Church (India)
Armenian Apostolic Church
Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church
Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church
Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church

Antiochian Catholic Church in America
Celtic Orthodox Church
Malabar Independent Syrian Church

Church of the East

Assyrian Church of the East
Holy Apostolic Catholic Assyrian Church of the East

Eastern Orthodox Church

Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople
Finnish Orthodox Church
Estonian Apostolic Orthodox Church (autonomy not universally recognized)
Greek Orthodox Church of Alexandria
Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch
Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem
Saint Catherine's Monastery in Egypt
Russian Orthodox Church
Latvian Orthodox Church (semi-autonomous)
Moldovan Orthodox Church (autonomy not universally recognized)
Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Moscow Patriarchate)
Japanese Orthodox Church(autonomy not universally recognized)
Chinese Orthodox Church
Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia (semi-autonomous; not universally recognized)
Estonian Orthodox Church of Moscow Patriarchate (semi-autonomous; not universally recognized)
Serbian Orthodox Church
Orthodox Ohrid Archbishopric - Macedonian (autonomy not universally recognized)
Romanian Orthodox Church
Bulgarian Orthodox Church
Georgian Orthodox and Apostolic Church
Cypriot Orthodox Church
Church of Greece
Polish Orthodox Church
Orthodox Autocephalous Church of Albania
Czech and Slovak Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church in America (autocephaly not universally recognized)
Russian Orthodox Church in America (not universally recognized)

Greek Old Calendarists
Montenegrin Orthodox Church
Macedonian Orthodox Church
Russian Old Believers
Ukrainian Orthodox Church
Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church
Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Kiev Patriarchy)

I hope this has helped.

Fush BaShlomo,
Yuhannon

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I have a list. Just let me finalize it. It is 20 pages long...

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Philippe,

Although there are a few aspects of this which are outdated (principally the names of a few primatial hierarchs and the elevations in status of the principal jurisdictions in a couple of instances), it's still an essentially correct listing of the Eastern and Orthodox Catholic Churches.

Churches and Rites

Regarding Shawn's list, I would note that the Byzantine Macedonians are not a Church sui iuris as yet, albeit the separation of data on their Exarchate from that of the Croatians in the most recent edition of Annuario Pontificio may be an indication that such is coming. Also, the Georgian Byzantines are, for all intents and purposes, an extinct Church, memory eternal.

Many years,

Neil


"One day all our ethnic traits ... will have disappeared. Time itself is seeing to this. And so we can not think of our communities as ethnic parishes, ... unless we wish to assure the death of our community."
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Glory to Jesus Christ!
I would appreciate if anyone could clarify the status of the Belarussian Greek Catholic Church and the Russian Catholic Church.
I did not think they are sui iuris Churches, at least not according to the current Annuario Pontificio.
If they still have eparchies/parishes/priests in these countries, I would be grateful for an update.
Thank you,
Deacon El


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Philippe,

Sorry about my link - it looks as though that thread tried to self-destruct. I'll need to do some edits to fix it.

Many years,

Neil


"One day all our ethnic traits ... will have disappeared. Time itself is seeing to this. And so we can not think of our communities as ethnic parishes, ... unless we wish to assure the death of our community."
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Deacon El,

The Belarusians have an Apostolic Visitator ad nutum Sanctae Sedis for Greek-Catholics in Belarus; their parishes there (about 15, I believe) are canonically subject to local Latin Ordinaries. There is also an Apostolic Visitator for Belarusan Greek-Catholics Outside Belarus (sited in UK); there is a single mission in the diaspora - Marian House in London. It is subject to the local Latin Ordinary. At the moment, the Belarusians would fall into a lonely niche of being a church sine episcopi - does that make them not a Church sui iuris? Matter of opinion. They have previously had a hierarchy and no one has bothered to say that they will not again.

The Russian Greek-Catholics in Russia are currently under an Ordinariate for Faithful of the Oriental Rites, a Latin Jesuit. The two Russian exarchates, Moscow and Harbin, are sede vacante but have never been formally suppressed. Same comments apply. There are, off the top of my head, about 8 parishes in Russia, 4 in the US, 1 in Australia, 1 or 2 in South America, another 2 - maybe 3 - in Europe.

The Albanians don't have a primatial hierarch per se - it's an Apostolic Administration and the Apostolic Administrator is a Byzantine, but not an Albanian and no one questions their status. As best anyone can tell, there might be 1 functional parish in Albania - none in the diaspora. The other parishes of the Apostolic Administration for Albania Meridionale, despite it being designated a Byzantine jurisdiction, are reputedly Latin.

AP does not list the Russians or Belarusians because their numbers are buried in Latin census counts and, thus, unretrievable as distinct counts.

As regards the Georgians, I believe it is safe to say that the Church no longer survives as a distinguishable entity. Its only Exarch, Father Archimandrite Shio Batmanshivili, of blessed memory, was martyred in the same era as Blessed Leonid. There is no indication that they were ever afforded a hierarch, the sole parish is now in use by (if I remember correctly) the Syriacs and their last presbyter reposed a half century ago. I doubt that there are more than a couple hundred remnant faithful, if that, and they are presumably dispersed among the Armenians of both Churches, the Georgian Orthodox, and the Latins.

Many years,

Neil


"One day all our ethnic traits ... will have disappeared. Time itself is seeing to this. And so we can not think of our communities as ethnic parishes, ... unless we wish to assure the death of our community."
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Here is my list of the Eastern Churches.

I've omitted the listing of Eastern Catholic Churches in communion with Rome, as that has already been dealt with.

I began working on this list two years ago, when I realized that not even the Catholic Bishops of the Philippines had a clear idea of the Eastern Churches. I actually began composing this list for some friends of mine in the Church, but now the list has taken a life of its own.

I. “Eastern Catholic” Communities that are not in communion with Rome. These two groups are not in communion with each other

(1) Society of St. Josaphat Kuncevyc (under the obedience of SSPX)
(2) The Pidhirtsi Fathers

UAOC Bishop Yury Yurchyk briefly converted to sedevacantist Catholicism, only to become a UOC-KP bishop. Last time he was heard from, he was said to be considering transferring to Moscow.

II. Canonical Eastern Orthodox Churches – except where noted, all of these Churches are in full communion with each other. By "Canonical Churches" I am referring to those Churches that are in communion with Constantinople, or lacking this, is in communion with its patriarchal mother church or with another canonical patriarchal church. This is not meant to be a judgment on the orthodoxy or worthiness of certain "unrecognized" Orthodox Churches. I am simply acknowledging the official usage of the Orthodox Churches themselves.

The various Autocephalous Churches are listed below. Listed under each Autocephalous Church are their Autonomous Churches and Dependencies. It should be pointed out that in most conventional listings of Orthodox Churches, the Autonomous Churches are counted separately.

While all the Autocephalous Churches are in communion with each other, there are Autonomous Churches that are not in communion or are not recognized as autonomous by other Autocephalous Churches and their dependencies. Furthermore, the various Autocephalous Churches do not always agree on which Churches are Autonomous.

Autocephalous Churches

A. Patriarchal Churches (listed by precedence)

1. Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Constantinople
a. Orthodox Church of Finland
b. Estonian Apostolic Orthodox Church – not in communion with the Russian Orthodox Church and all its dependencies

Non-Greek Canonical Churches under the Patriarchate of Constantinople. A unique institution of the Patriarchate of Constantinople is that it has, under its direct jurisdiction, non-Autonomous local Orthodox Churches in the “diaspora” that historically belonged to other Autocephalous Churches, but which have sought Constantinople’s oversight for various political, historical and cultural reasons.

i. Exarchate of Churches of the Russian Tradition in Western Europe / The Russian Orthodox Exarchate in Western Europe (note: sometimes classified as Autonomous)
ii. The Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA and Diaspora (UOCOFUSA)
iii.The Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Canada (UOCC)
iv.Albanian Orthodox Diocese of America
v.Belarusian Council of Orthodox Churches in North America
vi.American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Diocese (ACROD)

(Note: The Ecumenical Patriarchate has authority over the entire Greek Orthodox diaspora, although Jerusalem has often disputed this right. In addition, within Greece itself it retains direct authority over Crete, Athos and the Dodecanese islands. The Church in Crete has many of the rights and privileges of an autonomous Church. Of the 81 dioceses of the autocephalous State Church of Greece, the 36 dioceses located in the “New Lands” remain nominally under Constantinople, whilst being de facto governed by Athens)

2. Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria

3. Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch / Antiochian Orthodox (formerly known as Syrian Orthodox)
a. Self-Ruled Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America (not in communion with Jerusalem Patriarchate parishes in USA)

(Note: Antioch has established a large presence in the Philippines, under the authority of Met. Paul Saliba, which is distinguished by its use of the 1970 liturgical books of the Roman Catholic Church with standard Filipino liturgical abuses. It has been denounced by Constantinople as uncanonical and un-Orthodox and its chrismations judged invalid by the Greek Orthodox Metropolis in Southeast Asia)

4. Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem (note: is currently divided into two factions. All hierarchs and most priests support Patriarch Theophilos III while some priests support the deposed Patriarch Irineos)

a. Greek Orthodox Church of Sinai – considers itself as autocephalous, but generally considered as autonomous and dependent on the Patriarch of Jerusalem

(Note: Jerusalem has many parishes and monasteries in the US. These have been ostensibly transferred to Constantinople, but not one of these parishes and monasteries have recognized their own “transfer” and continue to commemorate the Patriarch of Jerusalem. Some of these parishes and monasteries are former ROCOR)

5. Patriarchate of Moscow and All Russia (Russian Orthodox Church) (note: not in communion with the Estonians under Constantinople and the Romanian Metropolia of Bessarabia)

a.Ukrainian Orthodox Church – Moscow Patriarchate (UOC-MP)
b.Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia (ROCOR) – (dependency of Moscow since May, 2007)
i.The “Indonesian Orthodox Church”, despite its autonomous-sounding name, is part of a ROCOR diocese.
c.Orthodox Church of Japan
d.Orthodox Church of China (destroyed by Maoists in the 1960’s, last priest died recently. It is currently made up only of lay faithful. Moscow has vowed to revive its clergy and is beginning to train priests)
e.Moldovan Orthodox Church
f.Latvian Orthodox Church
g.Estonian Orthodox Church – Moscow Patriarchate

(See also “Abkhazian Orthodox Church” in the Non-Canonical Churches section)

6. Patriarchate of Georgia (Georgian Orthodox Church)

7. Patriarchate of Serbia (Serbian Orthodox Church)
a.Archbishopric of Ohrid

(note: there is a Romanian Orthodox presence in Serbia whose canonical status is a matter of dispute between the Serbian and Romanian Patriarchates)

8. Patriarchate of Romania (Romanian Orthodox Church)
a.Metropolia of Bessarabia (not in communion with the Russian Orthodox Church and its dependencies)

The L’ECOF (Catholic-Orthodox Church of France) was under Romania until 1993. Prior to being under Romania it was successively under Moscow then ROCOR. Since 1993, most of L’ECOF has been “vagante”, but a deanery of ECOF parishes has remained under Romania. See L’ECOF under the “non-canonical” Churches.

9. Patriarchate of Bulgaria (Bulgarian Orthodox Church)

(Note: the Patriarchal Bulgarian diocese in North America has some parishes and monasteries of Russian Orthodox heritage, coming from ROCOR)

B. Autocephalous Metropolitanates / Archbishoprics

1.Orthodox Church of Cyprus

2.Church of Greece (under Archbishop of Athens) -- see note in the entry for the Ecumenical Patriarchate, regarding the division of authority in Greece.

3.Orthodox Church of Albania

4.Orthodox Church of Poland
a.Autonomous Orthodox Church of Portugal (and Brazil) / Orthodox Catholic Church of Portugal (and Brazil) (currently divided into two groups: one – the bishops and priests in Brazil and a few priests in Portugal -- in communion with the Polish Orthodox Church; and another -- the bishops and most priests in Portugal -- in schism from the Poles since 2000)

5.Orthodox Church of Czech and Slovak Lands

6.Orthodox Church of America (OCA) – (In communion with all autocephalous Orthodox Churches. Is considered as autocephalous by Russia, Poland, Georgia, Czech and Slovak Lands and Bulgaria and their dependencies. All other autocephalous Orthodox Churches and their dependencies consider it as merely autonomous. Nevertheless, OCA has maintained communion and concelebration with all autocephalous Orthodox Churches)

A unique institution of the OCA are the “ethnic dioceses”, three US dioceses that split from their mother autocephalous Orthodox Churches during the Cold War for political / anti-communist reasons, and which sought canonical refuge under OCA. These are fully functioning dioceses of the OCA but have some of the characteristics of autonomy:

-- Romanian Orthodox Episcopate of America (ROEA)
-- Albanian Orthodox Archdiocese in America
-- Bulgarian Diocese of the OCA

Note on “National Churches” (which national terms are given to what churches)

As can be seen from the above listing, there is often an overlap among national terms as applied to Churches, and the actual jurisdictions. This is true of the Romanian, Greeks, Albanian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian and – most of all – the Russian Orthodox.

These overlaps can be listed as follows (only “canonical jurisdictions’” listed):

The term “Russian Orthodox” is popularly given to the following:

(1) The Moscow Patriarchate or, simply, the “Russian Orthodox Church” without qualification. Aside from ROCOR, all of Moscow’s other dependencies may be called “Russian Orthodox” with some necessary qualifications (especially with regards to the Japanese Orthodox and the UOC-MP)

(2) Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia (ROCOR) – autonomous under MP

(3) The “Russian Orthodox Exarchate in Western Europe” under the Ecumenical Patriarchate

(4) The Orthodox Church of America – does not as a whole define itself as Russian Orthodox, but its Alaskan diocese and many parishes monasteries, cathedrals, clerics and lay faithful still do so, and OCA continues to have a “Russian Orthodox” ethos. For this reason OCA is still often called or classified as “Russian Orthodox”. OCA is, in fact, the old “Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Metropolia” in North America, which was granted autocephaly by Moscow in 1970. For this reason it continues to be popularly called “Russian Orthodox”

The term “Greek Orthodox” is given to the following:

1) The Patriarchate of Constantinople, However, the non-ethnic Greek canonical Churches under Constantinople are not so considered.
2) The Patriarchate of Alexandria
3) The Patriarchate of Jerusalem (the latter including Sinai).
4) The Orthodox Church of Greece
5) The Orthodox Church of Cyprus

Note: the Patriarchate of Antioch continues to employ the term “Greek Orthodox” in its official title, but has an Arab identity, and is generally no longer considered as “Greek Orthodox” in reality.

The term “Ukrainian Orthodox” is given to the following canonical Churches:

(1)Ukrainian Orthodox Church – Moscow Patriarchate (UOC-MP)
(2)Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA (and Diaspora) under the Ecumenical Patriarchate (UOCOFUSA)
(3) Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Canada under the Ecumenical Patriarchate (UOCC)

The term “Albanian Orthodox” is given to the following:

(1) Orthodox Church of Albania
(2) Albanian Orthodox Archdiocese in America (under OCA)
(3) Albanian Orthodox Diocese of America (under Ecumenical Patriarchate)

The term “Romanian Orthodox” and “Bulgarian Orthodox” are each applied to two distinct entities: the Patriarchates that respectively use the name, and the OCA dioceses that respectively call themselves by these terms.

Last edited by asianpilgrim; 02/20/09 04:29 PM.
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I will be posting my list of the "non-Canonical" Orthodox next.

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The Russian Greek-Catholics in Russia are currently under an Ordinariate for Faithful of the Oriental Rites, a Latin Jesuit. The two Russian exarchates, Moscow and Harbin, are sede vacante but have never been formally suppressed. Same comments apply. There are, off the top of my head, about 8 parishes in Russia, 4 in the US, 1 in Australia, 1 or 2 in South America, another 2 - maybe 3 - in Europe.


I find the state of Russian Catholicism (Byzantine Rite) to be really sad.

Australian Russian Catholics once had 3 priests; now they have but one. After Fr. Lawrence Cross... what?

Of the 4 parishes in the US, only two have their own (tiny) chapels. a third community shares a building with the Melkites and the last group is basically the community that attends the Sunday Divine Liturgy of Fr. Chrysostom Frank, who otherwise functions as a Latin-Rite priest and serves in a Latin parish.

Argentina has one mission and one small monastery with two clerics -- perhaps the only male Russian Catholic monastery left in the whole world, since Chevetogne (with 27 monks, of whom about half function according to the Byzantine Rite) normally isn't counted as a "Russian Catholic" institution.

Brazil has one chapel.

France has two parishes -- the one in Paris is now run by the Argentine priest Fr. Gabriel Diaz Patri, who is also known for his work in Spanish-speaking circles on behalf of the Traditional Roman Liturgy.

Germany has two communities, plus an Augustinian monastery with monthly Sunday Divine Liturgy (is this still continued?). There are also a number of ecumenical study centers (which, strictly speaking, are not really Russian Catholic).

Italy, in addition to the Russicum and the Uspenskij monastery, has an institution in Milan where the Divine Liturgy is celebrated once a month according to the Russian tradition. (Not exactly a parish or community...)

One thing that has struck me is that the "Russian Greek Catholic Church" outside Russia is no longer ethnically Russian at all. My question is, where are the descendants of the Russian Catholic diaspora? Where have they vanished to?

Do the following Russian Catholic institutions that are mentioned in the St. Michael's Russian Catholic parish website, still function?

1) The Ecumenical Chapel of SS. Peter and Paul in Finland
2) The church in Karaganda, Kazakhstan (I think this is UGCC, not Russian)
3) The "Pokroff" Journal and Russian Catholic center in the Hague, once under the Capuchins (by 1999 this had Divine Liturgy only on two Sundays a month)
4) The Istina center in France (I heard that it's still open but the Russian ORTHODOX are the ones who liturgize there)
5) Жизнь с Богом in Belgium

Quote
The Albanians don't have a primatial hierarch per se - it's an Apostolic Administration and the Apostolic Administrator is a Byzantine, but not an Albanian and no one questions their status. As best anyone can tell, there might be 1 functional parish in Albania - none in the diaspora. The other parishes of the Apostolic Administration for Albania Meridionale, despite it being designated a Byzantine jurisdiction, are reputedly Latin.


So why designate it a Byzantine jurisdiction?

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Shlomo Lkhoolkhoon,

Here is the information that I can get about the Albanian Greek Catholic Church from NationMaster.com .

The Apostolic Administratorship of Southern Albania has 3,200 Catholics in 9 parishes, with 11 churches, and is served by 4 diocesan and 10 religious priests, 10 male and 97 female religious, who administer 10 schools and 20 charitable institutions.

Fush BaShlomo Lkhoolkhoon,
Yuhannon

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Archimandrite George in Melbourne is not dead just yet. You dont mention that the Abbey of Niederaltaich has a Byzantine sub community. The foundation Russian Communities are themselves a mix of many ethnic groups, which include Russians. The Melbourne Centre included people of Russian, Belorussian, Polish, Georgian, Ossetian, Korean, Jewish, Italian (South Russian minority!) Anglo/Celtic, Slavic Macedonian, Bulgarian (New Russian region of today's Ukraine), Spanish (via Argentina) and Indian/SE Asian ethnicities. Put that lot together and things get interesting. Oh it got interesting also to work out who is in fact Catholic and who is actually Orthodox. Numbers would swell on certain feasts, as the Russian community did the rounds of the various churches to mark the feasts. As the services were idential (only the mention of the Pope and the RC Archbishop of Melbourne were different) and the lay out of the church was the same (no pews), as all the other Russian Churchs.

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Originally Posted by asianpilgrim
I find the state of Russian Catholicism (Byzantine Rite) to be really sad.

Australian Russian Catholics once had 3 priests; now they have but one. After Fr. Lawrence Cross... what?

Of the 4 parishes in the US, only two have their own (tiny) chapels. a third community shares a building with the Melkites and the last group is basically the community that attends the Sunday Divine Liturgy of Fr. Chrysostom Frank, who otherwise functions as a Latin-Rite priest and serves in a Latin parish.


St Andrew's belongs to the Russians. That we have a mission there is because the priest, Father Archimandrite Alexei (Smith), was ordained by our Eparch, Archbishop Joseph, of blessed memory, to the service of the Russians and is incardinated to our Eparchy.

As to the others, I don't know enough about the community in Denver to comment, but the Latin Archbishop there is very supportive of its existence and has entrusted it to the spiritual omophor of the Romanian Eparchy last I knew. St. Michael's, tiny chapel aside, is a vibrant parish community, presently served by a priest of the Melkite Eparchy, Father Economos Roman (Russo).

Quote
Brazil has one chapel


Philippe may be able to tell us whether or not this community is presently being pastorally served. Last year, the 4th anniversary Divine Liturgy for Father Joann Stoisser, a Jesuit who served the Brazilian Russian community for a number of years, was served by a priest from Argentina.

Quote
Italy, in addition to the Russicum and the Uspenskij monastery, has an institution in Milan where the Divine Liturgy is celebrated once a month according to the Russian tradition. (Not exactly a parish or community...)


More than one parish has had its beginnings in Divine Liturgies served once monthly. Try to be more positive.

Quote
The church in Karaganda, Kazakhstan (I think this is UGCC, not Russian)


The communities are inter-mingled, but the (now 7, I believe) parish communities are in the care of the Ukrainians. See Грекокатолическая Церковь в Казахстане - Link to an English language "History of the Greek Catholic Church in Kazakhstan" - left side, just above the first horizontal divider.

Btw, Bishop Joseph Wirth, SJ, of the Ordinariate for Faithful of the Oriental Rites in Russia, was raised among this exile community.

Quote
The Istina center in France


The Center is operated by the Dominicans, together with St Basil's College. It continues its ecumenical activity.

Originally Posted by Irish Melkite
The Albanians don't have a primatial hierarch per se - it's an Apostolic Administration and the Apostolic Administrator is a Byzantine, but not an Albanian and no one questions their status. As best anyone can tell, there might be 1 functional parish in Albania - none in the diaspora. The other parishes of the Apostolic Administration for Albania Meridionale, despite it being designated a Byzantine jurisdiction, are reputedly Latin.


Quote
So why designate it a Byzantine jurisdiction?


That decision is Rome's, not mine. When it was initially so designated Albanian Meridionale was primarily Byzantine; it no longer is. Shenjtë Virgjër Meri Shqip Grek-Katolik at Elbasan is the sole Byzantine parish remaining.

Many years,

Neil


"One day all our ethnic traits ... will have disappeared. Time itself is seeing to this. And so we can not think of our communities as ethnic parishes, ... unless we wish to assure the death of our community."
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Originally Posted by Yuhannon
Shlomo Lkhoolkhoon,

Here is the information that I can get about the Albanian Greek Catholic Church from NationMaster.com .

The Apostolic Administratorship of Southern Albania has 3,200 Catholics in 9 parishes, with 11 churches, and is served by 4 diocesan and 10 religious priests, 10 male and 97 female religious, who administer 10 schools and 20 charitable institutions.

Fush BaShlomo Lkhoolkhoon,
Yuhannon


Shawn,

Unfortunately, according to the information that I have been able to gather, only 1 of the parishes (and one small community of nuns) is Byzantine (see my post above). The remainder are Latin.

From Father Ron Roberson's material at CNEWA on the Albanians:

Quote
In 1996 Hil Kabashi was appointed the first bishop of the Apostolic Administration since 1945, but its faithful, which number about 3,500, are almost entirely of the Latin rite. The only exception is a small parish that is associated with a community of Basilian Sisters of St. Macrina located in Elbasan at the site of the earlier mission.


Many years,

Neil


"One day all our ethnic traits ... will have disappeared. Time itself is seeing to this. And so we can not think of our communities as ethnic parishes, ... unless we wish to assure the death of our community."
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The Center is operated by the Dominicans, together with St Basil's College. It continues its ecumenical activity.


However, Istina seems to be attended by Orthodox seminarians studying in Paris, and the liturgy is served by Orthodox priests and hierarchs.

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