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Re: Easter Basket [Re: Pani Rose] #318179 04/08/09 12:17 AM
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Miller Offline
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Originally Posted by Pani Rose

PASCHA BREAD #2
1 Tsp. Sugar 6 Eggs, well beaten
1 C. Sugar
1 C. lukewarm water
1/2 C. Melted butter or oleo/margarine
1 Large cake yeast
3 C. Scalded milk
1 Tsp. Sugar
9-12 C. Flour To these ingredients always add 1/4 cup oil & 1/2 cup
extra sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla
1 cup white raisins
2 extra eggs and a lot of love.




I think your 2nd "Paska" recipe is really for Babka. For those who don't know the difference between Babka & Paska: Babka, popular in
Western Ukraine has raisins, vanilla, more sugar, optional orange peel, optional icing and more sweets.
Quote
Velykodnia Babka
(Ukrainian Easter Babka)

During Easter, two breads showcase the Ukrainian homemaker- "Paska", and
"Babka". "Baba" means "grandmother" in Ukrainian or "woman" and the diminutive
form is "babka". Every household has it's own variation of this special bread,
and I have always preferred this recipe that my Mother uses. It is quite complex
as bread recipes go, and while there are much simpler versions, this one stands
alone in its taste and texture. This recipe, as well as others on these pages,
comes from "Traditional Ukrainian Cookery" by Savella Stechishin, Trident Press
Ltd. Winnipeg, Canada 1959.
1-cup milk
1/3-cup flour
2 teaspoons sugar
Ѕ cup lukewarm water
3 packages dry granular yeast
10 to 12 egg yolks
2 whole eggs
1-teaspoon salt
1 cup sugar, scant
1 cup melted butter, scant
2 teaspoons vanilla
Grated rind of one lemon
5 Ѕ cups to 6 cups sifted flour
1 cup golden raisins dusted in flour, if desired
Bring the milk to a boil and remove from the range. Add the hot milk gradually
to the Ѕ cup flour and beat thoroughly until smooth and free of lumps. If
necessary, strain or press the mixture through a sieve. Cool it to lukewarm.
Dissolve the 2 teaspoons sugar in the lukewarm water, sprinkle the yeast over
it, and let stand till every yeast granule is softened. Combine with the
lukewarm milk-flour paste, beat well, cover, and let it rise in a warm place
until light and bubbly (usually on top of the gas range is a good idea, away
from flames). Beat the egg yolks (find another use for the whites) and the whole
eggs together along with the salt; add the 1-cup sugar gradually and continue
beating till light. Beat in the butter, vanilla, and lemon rind. Combine this
mixture with the sponge and mix well. Stir in enough flour to make a very soft
dough and knead it in the bowl by hand by working the dough over and up
continually for about 10 minutes. The usual method of kneading does not apply to
babka dough. This dough is very soft. Thorough kneading is essential to develop
its elasticity. When raisins are used, add them after the dough has been
kneaded. Cover the bowl with a towel and let it rise in a warm place until it
doubles in bulk. Punch it down, knead a few more times, and let it rise again.
This second rising may be omitted, but there are those cooks who claim the
second rising gives a superior product (we always let it rise twice).
Prepare tall, 2 and 3 pound coffee cans by buttering them generously with soft
butter and sprinkling them lightly with fine breadcrumbs. Traditional Ukrainian
babka is always baked in tall, cylindrical cans. Fill the cans one third full
with dough. This is very important. If there is a bit of dough left over, use a
proportionately smaller can prepared in the same manner as above. Gather the
cans together in a warm place and cover with a towel again and let it rise until
it reaches the brim of the pan. It should triple in bulk. Brush the tops with
beaten eggs diluted with 2 tablespoons of milk or water. Bake in a moderate oven
(375 F) for about 10 minutes, then lower the heat to 325 F and bake for about 30
minutes; then again lower the temperature to 275 F and continue baking for 15 to
20 minutes longer. The baking period depends on the size of the loaves. If
needed, cover with aluminum foil to prevent scorching. Babka dough is very
delicate and temperamental. Loud noises or constant opening of the oven's door
is not encouraged. Babka dough should be baked at a moderately high temperature
at first in order to puff up and form a firm crust, and then the temperature is
lowered because this dough is very rich and scorches easily.
Remove the baked loaves from the oven and let them stand in the pans for 5 to 10
minutes. Tip each loaf very carefully from the pan onto a soft, cloth-covered
pillow. Do not cool the loaves on a hard surface. This is extremely important,
because careless handling of the loaves at this point could cause them to
collapse or settle. As the loaves are cooling, gently change their position a
few times to prevent settling.
Babka is always sliced in rounds across the loaf. The sliced bottom crust serves
as a protective cover, and it is put back to prevent the loaf from drying out.
If desired, cooled loaves may be iced or glazed and decorated with baker's
confetti.
Babka Glaze
Mix together Ѕ cup of confectioner's sugar with Ѕ teaspoon of lemon juice and
enough warm water to give a spreading consistency. Spread this icing over the
top of the babka and sprinkle with baker's confetti
http://www.brama.com/yonkersukrainianfest/recipe_babka.html


Re: Easter Basket [Re: Miller] #318198 04/08/09 02:08 AM
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Good point Miller, I never connected that. I have heard the name, but really did know for sure what it was. See, I too am a convert biggrin A Southern Baptist girl, raised in the south, married a Polish National Catholic, and we both became Ruthenian. I never heard a Polish name throughout high school. 40 years now married to Fr. Deacon Cholewisnki, I am still learning biggrin biggrin

Re: Easter Basket [Re: Pani Rose] #318205 04/08/09 03:23 AM
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stormshadow Offline
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My wife is part Polish and her mother makes the Babka. Great stuff!!! Hers is almost like cinnamon roll with a streusel topping. I haven't gotten the recipe yet. I know the dough has to rise FOUR times.


Re: Easter Basket [Re: stormshadow] #318235 04/08/09 01:50 PM
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Alice Offline
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Originally Posted by stormshadow
My wife is part Polish and her mother makes the Babka. Great stuff!!! Hers is almost like cinnamon roll with a streusel topping. I haven't gotten the recipe yet. I know the dough has to rise FOUR times.



How absolutely divine it sounds! I have tried store bought and even that was good! YUM!!!!!!

Re: Easter Basket [Re: stormshadow] #318236 04/08/09 02:11 PM
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Pani Rose Offline
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Originally Posted by stormshadow
My wife is part Polish and her mother makes the Babka. Great stuff!!! Hers is almost like cinnamon roll with a streusel topping. I haven't gotten the recipe yet. I know the dough has to rise FOUR times.



My husbands grandma always made the Babka, but somehow I never connected that it had a different name than the Pascha. I had always heard the word, but it never seem to register in my brain until yesterday. I always loved it, but my hubby is not a rasin eater, so he passes. He really doesn't know what he is missing.

Re: Easter Basket [Re: Pani Rose] #318247 04/08/09 02:29 PM
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Alice Offline
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So 'Pascha' (the bread, not the holiday) in Russia is the same as 'Babka' in Poland?!?

And this is the traditional Easter bread for Russia, Ukraine and Poland?

The Greek Easter bread is not as exciting... frown

Alice


Re: Easter Basket [Re: Alice] #318271 04/08/09 03:38 PM
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theophan Offline
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ALICE:

Actually the Pascha breads that I've had are just a very fine bread that is not sweet nor does it have any cinnamon. It could be sliced for sandwiches or used for morning toast. The Babka I've had is like cinnamon bread you'd eat for breakfast.

BOB

Last edited by theophan; 04/08/09 03:48 PM.
Re: Easter Basket [Re: Miller] #318275 04/08/09 03:41 PM
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theophan Offline
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Miller:

Actually the Hrudka cheese I've had is almost wet in its moisture content and is so rich I can't eat but about a half slice at a time.

Fresh mozarella is about the same. It comes in its own excess water and can almost be squeezed to get more moisture out of it.

BOB

Last edited by theophan; 04/08/09 03:42 PM.
Re: Easter Basket [Re: Alice] #318277 04/08/09 03:44 PM
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Halia12 Offline
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Originally Posted by Alice
So 'Pascha' (the bread, not the holiday) in Russia is the same as 'Babka' in Poland?!?
And this is the traditional Easter bread for Russia, Ukraine and Poland?

The Greek Easter bread is not as exciting... frown

Alice


No Alice that is not true. This is true:
Quote
I think your 2nd "Paska" recipe is really for Babka. For those who don't know the difference between Babka & Paska: Babka, popular in
Western Ukraine has raisins, vanilla, more sugar, optional orange peel, optional icing and more sweets.


The ladies at church who bake for the Easter bazaar sales are very firm about the differences. And this is one of the differences between Eastern Ukrainians & Western Ukrainians. Western Ukrainians bake both Babka & Paska for Easter but distinguish between the two as has already been said. Eastern Ukrainians bake only Paska for Easter.
And the bread is Paska not Pascha.
Hope I have it clear to all.

Re: Easter Basket [Re: stivvy] #318278 04/08/09 03:44 PM
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theophan Offline
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Quote
What do you do with the Hrin?


Stivy:

To me it's a bit like the British custom of having horseradish with roast beef. It's a great relish to liven up the taste buds.

BOB

Re: Easter Basket [Re: theophan] #318279 04/08/09 03:45 PM
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Alice Offline
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Originally Posted by theophan
ALICE:

Actually the Pascha breads that I've had are just a very fine bread taht is not sweet nor does it have any cinnamon. It could be sliced for sandwiches or used for morning toast. The Babka I've had is like cinnamon bread you'd eat for breakfast.

BOB


Ahh...so Russian Pascha bread must be like the Greek tsoureki bread for Easter...kind of like a sweeter version of Challah bread?

P.S. I like horseradish...delis also have something called 'horseradish mayonnaise' which is really good on roast beef sandwiches too.

Re: Easter Basket [Re: Alice] #318280 04/08/09 03:47 PM
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theophan Offline
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ALICE:

A Russian Pascha is like Halia12 describes. It's a very fine bread but not sweet. It's just the finest homemade bread you'll ever sink your teeth into. Something like my Sedish grandmother used to make when she made limpa rye. You let it rise a couple times and punch it down and each time it makes the final product that much more dense and that much more fine in texture.

BOB

Re: Easter Basket [Re: Alice] #318282 04/08/09 03:49 PM
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Halia12 Offline
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Quote
Ahh...so Russian Pascha bread must be..kind of like a sweeter version of Challah bread?


No Alice, Challah is a Jewish bread and does not have milk and eggs because it is against Koser laws to mix milk and eggs. As you can see from the recipes Paska has milk and eggs and lots of eggs.

Re: Easter Basket [Re: theophan] #318283 04/08/09 03:50 PM
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Halia12 Offline
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Originally Posted By: Alice
So 'Pascha' (the bread, not the holiday) in Russia is the same as 'Babka' in Poland?!?
And this is the traditional Easter bread for Russia, Ukraine and Poland?

The Greek Easter bread is not as exciting...

Alice



No Alice that is not true. This is true:

Quote:
I think your 2nd "Paska" recipe is really for Babka. For those who don't know the difference between Babka & Paska: Babka, popular in
Western Ukraine has raisins, vanilla, more sugar, optional orange peel, optional icing and more sweets.


The ladies at church who bake for the Easter bazaar sales are very firm about the differences. And this is one of the differences between Eastern Ukrainians & Western Ukrainians. Western Ukrainians bake both Babka & Paska for Easter but distinguish between the two as has already been said. Eastern Ukrainians bake only Paska for Easter.
And the bread is Paska not Pascha.
Hope I have it clear to all.

Re: Easter Basket [Re: Halia12] #318287 04/08/09 04:07 PM
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John K Offline
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Coming from a family that is Polish on both sides, I can asssure you that the babka that I was raised on at Easter (and Christmas) is the same thing as the Paskas that I experienced at my former Ruthenian GC parish, and the breads that I have purchased at the bakes sales of the Ukrainian GC just down the street from the Polish parish where I was raised.

No cinnamon, vanilla, orange peel or icings. That would be the kulichs that we bought at the RO church around the other corner. Baked in coffee cans and iced with a glaze.

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