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I have a couple of questions that google has not provided much of an answer to so far.

It is pretty well known that in the nineteenth century in Russia (and some very prominent examples occur well after that) theology was a lay discipline; for example, or 31 lecturers at the St Petersburg theolgical academy only 6 were priests. The role of female laity is less dominant and doesn't start till the 20th century, though it is not unusual at all to find female faculty in particular areas (literature, languages and music) in Russian and Ukrainian Orthodox seminaries. There are now certainly notable female faculty even in systematics in American and European Orthodox seminaries.

My questions are:

1. In the Slavic eastern catholic churches, was there any era of lay dominance in faculty at such seminaries as the Ivano-Frankvisk seminary? This would be in Europe presumably, given the problems of the Ruthenians in the US.
2. Are there any notable lay Eastern Catholic theologians whose work is worth looking up? I can only think of clerical examples.
3. Are there any Eastern Catholic female theologians (particularly in systematics) that are worth reading? At the moment I can't think of any as well known as Vassa Larin, for example.

I'm sure some on the forum are educated in this area.

Regards

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Vladimir Lossky comes to mind.


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Sister Vassa Larina (Russian Orthodox Liturgiologist) (ROCOR, I believe)
Dr. Nicholas V. Russo, Ph.D. (Melkite-Greek Catholic Liturgiologist)
Paul Evdokimov (Russian Orthodox scholar of Spirituality)
Dr. Panayiotis Trembelas (Greek Orthodox Dogmatic Theologian)

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Thanks but the question was regarding eastern catholic theologians I should look up specifically, and also whether there was ever an era of lay dominance equivalent to that in the Orthodox Slavic Churches. Thanks for the reference to Dr Russo.

Off topic pedantry: When writing to people such as those listed it is regarded as incorrect to use both Dr and Ph.D. when writing a name; only one should be used. Also, Dr (and Mr) is a contraction, and should not end with a full stop in traditional English. Consider the difference between Dr and Mr and Mrs. (which should end in a full stop). Pedantry perhaps, but I am of that mould where I believe that people should know how to address hand written letters and know which fork to use. Oh for the dying art of etiquette...

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While we're at it, I've been taught that "Professor" as an address is used by itself--I may be properly addressed as "Professor" or "Dr Hawkins," but "Professor Hawkins" is incorrect.


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It depends; in the US, all faculty are professors to their students, but in Australia and the British Commonwealth (except maybe Canada?) Professor is a distinct title of honour, awarded for outstanding achievements or for occupying a particular position. In the former case, one has to occupy the position of Associate Professor for a period; my father I think was five years an Associate Professor before progressing. Also, in the US, all teaching academics are professors, but in the Commonwealth one's chance of being a Professor diminishes exponentially with teaching commitments.

In European countries influenced by the German system the titles are quite different and even more arcane, and in the Russian system the titles of Dr and Professor are at least in part awarded by the state (albeit a rubber stamp by the academy of sciences on something the university sends them).

Going back on topic; if Metropolitan Alfeyev had not been to Oxford, he would not have been entitled to be called Dr as the Kandidat degree he would have got via the Moscow Academy does not come with that title, though work wise it is more demanding probably than a western PhD (proficiency in multiple languages, knowledge of general philosophy regardless of field of study and publication of a number of articles in specified peer reviewed journals, and a viva voce).


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Omitting the full stop on Mr., Dr. is British usage. American usage includes the periods Neither is more 'traditional'. And just as a stopped clock is right twice a day, you are right: this is pedantry! Etiquette, well, that's another question entirely but I greatly fear it is a lost battle by now!

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Originally Posted by Ot'ets Nastoiatel'
Omitting the full stop on Mr., Dr. is British usage.


As is "mould". My American Firefox browser makes a red squiggly line under it.

I wonder how adept at grammar Eastern Catholic Lay and Female theologians are.

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I can think of Dr Adam DeVille, though I believe he is a sub-deacon in the UGCC. He is an assistant professor of Theology at the University of St. Francis and a frequent poster on the forum.

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Dr. Anthony Dragani, PhD smile has a popular Byzantine Catholic website, www.east2west.org

He has contributed in this forum before, and I believe he is Ruthenian.

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Originally Posted by jjp
Dr. Anthony Dragani, PhD smile has a popular Byzantine Catholic website, www.east2west.org

He has contributed in this forum before, and I believe he is Ruthenian.


Anthony is indeed a Ruthenian.

Many years,

Neil


"One day all our ethnic traits ... will have disappeared. Time itself is seeing to this. And so we can not think of our communities as ethnic parishes, ... unless we wish to assure the death of our community."
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Ruthenia is lucky to have him.


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