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A photographer from the Irish Catholic was present on Saturday and took some photos , one of which was published in the paper on 24th Nov., together with an article which has also been put on the Dublin parish Website

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Archimandrite Serge Keleher, chaplain to the Ukrainian Greek Catholics in Ireland, has been laid to rest following his funeral in Dublin at the weekend.
Msgr Keleher died on November 11 after a long illness. His remains were taken to the main chapel of Holy Cross College, Clonliffe, on Friday November 18 and received by Bishop Hlib Lonchyna, Apostolic Visitor for Ukrainian Greek Catholics in Ireland. Archbishop Diarmuid Martin greeted Bishop Hlib and the mourners prior to the commencement of the Parastas for a priest, a ceremony which lasted over two hours. Bishop Hlib led the service with help from a number of Greek Catholic priests from Ukraine and Canada.
He briefly referred to the archimandrite’s preference that liturgical traditions should be correctly observed.
This was followed by concelebrated Divine Liturgy for the repose of Msgr Keleher’s soul the following morning concelebrated by a number of Irish Latin-rite priests.
The Divine Liturgy was chanted in Old Church Slavonic, Ukrainian and English. Bishop Hlib preached in Ukrainian and English paying tribute to Msgr Keleher’s work as a priest and a scholar.
Msgr Keleher was an Irishman who loved the Irish nation and presided over the translation of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom into Irish, which he would regularly use in the course of the liturgy. ..........


The full article can be read HERE


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Fr Serge's funeral

Place - all services took place in the Seminary Church which is dedicated to the Holy Cross.

By the time we got there , all preparations had been completed - the full Iconostasis had been brought , by van , from the other end of the College buildings , and re- erected on the Sanctuary leaving a huge space behind it . Mics had been set up [ and they were needed ] and the Church itself was immaculate - it's not often used so needed a degree of ' spit and polish '

Friday - the reception of the body into the Church was originally scheduled for , I believe , at 5.30pm I went down there at 5pm and found the Undertakers [ Funeral Directors ] car already there.

I went into the Church to find Kyr Hlib there , and vested, to receive the body - this had been brought forward as His Grace, the Archbishop of Dublin , Diarmuid Martin, had wished to attend but unfortunately could not attend later due to other engagements. His Grace followed the Coffin as it was brought into the Church and read a portion of the Gospel from the front of the Church beside the coffin .

One of the EC priests from Canada and the USA had brought booklets in English and Ukrainian with the Order of Services for the burial of a Priest with him - very very welcome they were.

Fr Serge was in the Vestments given to him by the Parish at Pascha this year - he was wearing his white mitre .

As the members of the Community arrived they came forward to the coffin and many left flowers on the end of the coffin.

There were 3 EC Priests present including the Vicar General from London, who at present is flying over each Sunday to Serve Liturgy for the people [ as I understood from what the Bishop said later , this will continue until a new priest is appointed ] . The other 2 priests have Served in Dublin , helping Fr Serge at Pascha in years past and present . There was also an Orthodox Priest present as well . There were 3 RC Priests [ from Cork and the Pro-Cathedral ] as well and all took part in the Parastas.

The Chanter was Mr A Bebko from London. As those who have read Fr Serge's accounts of Pascha in years past may recall. Mr Bebko has been going there for about 10 years. Sadly Edward Yong was not able to come over [ but he sent a friend David who is studying in Dublin as his substitute on the Saturday ]

The service was beautiful - something I've never experienced before . I was asked to read one the the Epistles and did so. The congregation played their part in the ceremony joining in with the chant - and, as was said to me afterwards by S.ilvio
Quote
Also I noticed the congregation seems to be very strong. Not large in number but huge in spirit. Your typical close knit immigrant community, far from home. Sad in a way because you can sense the home sickness but united in looking out for each other…


There weren't a huge number of the parish present at the beginning of the service - but numbers grew as people got home from work .

Saturday

The Funeral Liturgy started at 10am promptly - all the Clergy from Friday evening were there . All the Servers were there and added to their number that day was Paul - who has helped Fr Serge for many years . I was stunned to see him , but he obviously felt that that was where he should be that day - giving his own last service to Fr Serge .

The Liturgy was very moving , again I've never experienced this, all the Chant being in a minor key - haunting is the only way I can describe it . The languages used were Ukrainian , English and Latin ! The Creed and Our Father were also sung in Latin and most beautifully sung by the Priests from the Pro-Cathedral and some members of the Parish . One of the RC Priests came from Cork - again he has been in the Parish in the past - he wore beautiful black vestments , his own , and new ones too smile

Communion took some time - even with 3 priests too - many more flowers were placed on the Coffin

Later we all made our own farewell , during the 'Final Kiss' , by this time many of the congregation [ including me ] were in tears .

A Panachyda was then sung - with all the priests round the coffin and at the conclusion of that the Coffin was closed and taken out to be taken to the Cemetery for burial .

Slowly all the cars made their way out of the College Grounds and went to the St Jerome Cemetery - a very large one with a huge amount of walking . I was fortunate - members of the Parish took me and Edward's friend David over there.

Following the Burial , Kyr Hlib invited everyone to a meal at the Bewley's Hotel in Leopardstown .

I was extremely luck at this point - the couple who took us , Mr Bebko , David and myself went there avoiding the centre of Dublin - so we were there very quickly and I was able to relax for a bit. Lunch itself was truly splendid - and very well organised.

Following lunch Kyr Hlib spoke about his memories of Fr Serge and asked us to share our memories .

We heard stories of how the Parish started and how it has grown . We heard how Fr Serge got his green Mitre - a fascinating tale wink and eventually we all went back home

The Bishop left early, before many of the reminiscences as he had to fly to Paris in the early evening for the Annual Divine Liturgy in Notre Dame Cathedral on the Sunday.

Sunday

The final Service in the Holy Cross Church - a beautiful Liturgy , with the same three priests again . Again there was a mix of English and Ukrainian languages used . At Communion it was so nice to see so many children and teens present and coming from all directions in the Church down together , before the adults.

At the end the men came forward and started taking down the Iconostasis and organising the removal of all the liturgical accoutrements [ and believe me there were plenty of them ] back down to the Chapel at the other end of the building , by van .

I was astounded how soon the Church was cleared , carpets hoovered and all signs of our presence were gone



ETERNAL MEMORY

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Thank you Anhelyna for the wonderfully written account of Fr Serge's final farewell


Eternal Memory...

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Found this review of Fr. Serge's book on the Ruthenian Byzantine Liturgy by James Likoudis. Memory Eternal!

Dn. Robert


An Eastern Catholic Examines
Liturgical Problems
By JAMES LIKOUDIS

Fr. Archimandrite Serge Keleher is one of the best informed and scholarly authorities regarding events taking place in both the Eastern Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches. As Editor of the "Eastern Churches Journal : A Review of Eastern Christianity" (P.O. Box 146, Fairfax, VA 22038-0146; subscription $40 yr.), he regularly provides a thorough review of happenings in the world of Eastern Christianity as well as reports on aspects of ecumenical progress resulting from the Second Vatican Council. Living in Dublin, Ireland, since 1986, he has been the Greek-Catholic priest serving the growing number of Byzantine Catholic faithful, many of whom are immigrants from Russia, Belarus, Ukraine (both Western Ukraine and Donbas), Moldavia, Latvia, the USA, and elsewhere. There are also Irish members of his flock who have been attracted to the beauty and majesty of the Byzantine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom. Divine Services held at St. Kevin’s Oratory at the Pro-Cathedral in Dublin include a mix of Church-Slavonic, Greek, Irish, and other languages as needed.

In his 2006 work "Studies on the Byzantine Liturgy-I" (Staurpegion Press, P.O.Box 11096, Pittsburgh, PA 5237-9998) Fr. Archimandrite Serge made an extensive and minute critique of a Draft document proposing a "Recasting of the Byzantine-Ruthenian Divine Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom" by the Byzantine-Ruthenian Metropolitanate of Pittsburgh. Since the publication of Fr. Serge’s book, this Draft document, for the most part, has been promulgated as the official English translations of the Divine Liturgies of St. John Chrysostom and of St. Basil the Great for the aforementioned jurisdiction, and has been "received" by the Congregation for Eastern Churches in Rome, which recognizes them as the licitly promulgated official texts for liturgical use. Any new translation of the Divine Liturgy in English, Fr. Serge had pointed out, affects all the various Byzantine Greek-Catholic Churches. He also noted the continuing dispute between "those who wanted a liturgical practice as close as possible to the liturgical practice of Eastern Orthodoxy, and those who wanted a liturgical practice as distant as possible from that of Eastern Orthodoxy" (involving also the introduction of certain latinizing practices). He recounts the recent history of liturgical and political conflicts among the Byzantine-rite bishops and priests and the resistance in the Pittsburgh Metropolitanate to a "people’s edition of the Divine Liturgy in conformity with the official Church-Slavonic books published in Rome".

Our author insists that any proposed restoration of Byzantine liturgical practice adapted to conditions in English-speaking countries must be in accordance with "the clear and unambiguous" directives of Vatican II and the Roman See which observed that renewal among Byzantine-rite Catholics cannot be "a blind imitation of a dead past, but an attempt to free Eastern Catholics from a past in which, severed from the roots of their own tradition, they were deprived of any organic development and could conceive of growth only as sterile servility to their Latin confreres". To be regretted among Byzantine rite clergy (quoting words of another leading Byzantine liturgical scholar Robert Taft, S.J.), is a certain "latinization of the heart resulting from a formation insensitive to the true nature of the variety of traditions within the Catholic Church". Failure to live the authentic theological, spiritual, and liturgical ethos of the Byzantine Catholic tradition only serves to impede the prospects of Reunion with the various Eastern Orthodox Churches.

This is the background for Archimandrite Serge’s concerns regarding the liturgical rubrics in the proposed English translation of the Byzantine-Ruthenian Liturgy which he declared "confused and inadequate. He was also very critical of the use of "horizontal inclusive" language in the proposed draft (sadly, this has become part of the officially promulgated liturgical texts). He cites the fact that both the Magisterium of the Catholic Church and the proper authorities in Eastern Orthodoxy have voiced strong opposition to the use of such language in the Liturgy. Moreover, there are alleged serious textual inaccuracies and mistranslations (he alleges 23 of them though he admits that some may be the object of legitimate dispute). In addition, he declared problematic 33 other instances of words or phrases rendered in English that do not faithfully render the meaning of the original (or best) texts in Greek or Church-Slavonic.

Readers may not be interested in the "nuts and bolts" of the liturgical problems and difficulties encountered by our Byzantine Catholic brethren in their efforts to revivify their spiritual and apostolic heritage, but they too can profit from acute observations touching on the Roman rite contained in Fr. Archimandrite Serge’s Study. Throughout his volume, he fittingly quotes the liturgical views of Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger whose profound understanding of Catholic liturgical worship is, in fact, reflected in all the Church’s traditional liturgies of East and West, faithfully observed. Interestingly, he points out that "the Novus Ordo Missae of Pope Paul VI does not require the priest to offer the Eucharistic Prayer aloud" (although, contrary to longstanding practice, this is required in the new Byzantine-Ruthenian Liturgicon). It has become common, he states, for the Eucharistic Prayer (known as the Anaphora in the Byzantine rite) to be recited aloud and in vernacular languages. But "is there a heightened appreciation of the Roman Canon - one of the most ancient Anaphoras anywhere in the Church?" Not only has use of the magnificent Roman Canon become "very rare in practice" but neither has understanding or reverence at Mass grown. "Far from understanding increasing, there has been an insatiable demand for ‘new’Anaphoras’ - the modern Roman Liturgy now has Anaphoras for use during Mass celebrated with children (in all the history of the Church no one ever heard of such a thing").

Certain liturgical innovations in the Roman Liturgy difficult for many to understand (such as altar girls, women Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion dominating the sanctuary, the near-mandatory celebration "facing the people", the increasingly widespread practice of "Communion in the hand", and attempts to introduce "Inclusive language") Fr. Archimandrite Serge regards as creating serious difficulties for the prospects of Reunion with the Eastern Orthodox. It may be added here that a recent Eastern Orthodox theologian also has not hesitated to declare his brethren repelled by what they regard as "a new and alien liturgical spirit". (Fr. Laurent A. Cleenewerck in his book "His Broken Body" - see notice of my Review on my Website: www.CREDOBUFFALO.COM).

The same writer took occasion to declare:

"As long as the current liturgical spirit of modern Roman Catholicism remains the accepted norm, no amount of theological dialogue will achieve any resul".
With Byzantine Catholics encountering the phenomenon of "Americanization" as well as social and clergy pressures to adopt some of the above or yet other untraditional practices contrary to their best liturgical tradition (for example, in the past, there had been pressure, much of it self-inflicted, for Ruthenian Catholics to eliminate icon-screens and, at present, there is pressure, also mostly self-inflicted, to no longer pray the Anaphora inaudibly, in secreto or in mystica, the practice of the last thousand years), it is understandable that Fr. Archimandrite Serge should ask whether Byzantine Catholics should hazard adopting innovations which in the Western Church have "contributed to a serious reduction in the Faith concerning the Divine Liturgy and the Holy Gifts. One may question whether such results are desirable in the Greek-Catholic Church".

A careful reading of Fr. Archimandrite Serge’s work reveals similar problems encountered by the faithful of the various branches of the Byzantine Rite (Ruthenians, Ukranians, Melkites), to those encountered by Catholics of the Roman rite troubled by certain liturgical innovations (some even receiving official ecclesiastical sanction), and outright abuses offending the very sense of the Sacred. As there has been a pattern of resistance to the authority of Rome regarding directives to implement a real "reform of the reform" regarding liturgical practice in the West, so has there been a similar resistance to Vatican II’s (and Rome’s) insistence that Greek-Catholics maintain the authentic liturgical heritage and practice of the Catholic Church’s Byzantine tradition.

Our author concluded that:

"the honor of the Catholic Church is involved. Rome urges Greek-Catholics to be conscious of the liturgical and spiritual treasures which Greek-Catholics hold in common with the Eastern Orthodox. If this October 12, 2004 Draft were to be adopted as it stands, it would distance the Byzantine-Ruthenian Catholic Metropolitan of Pittsburgh still further, both from the other Greek-Catholics in the United States and from Eastern Orthodox in the United States. That is a severe drawback... If this draft were to be adopted, it would give substance to the accusation that such pious statements from Rome are simply window-dressing and that in reality Rome wants a revisionist liturgy to drive a further wedge between the Greek-Catholics and the Eastern Orthodox."
These are serious matters for Catholics of every liturgical rite involved in the Church’s ecumenical efforts. The subject "proposed Draft" with all its problematic aspects that have been the focus of this article, with only minor changes, has received, as previously noted, the approval of the Byzantine- Ruthenian Metropolitan of Pittsburgh, along with the Council of Hierarchs of the Pittsburgh Byzantine-Ruthenian Metropolia, and the Congregation for Eastern Churches in Rome, and has been promulgated as the official English translation of the Divine Liturgies for that jurisdiction. It has been reported, by members of both clergy and laity of the jurisdiction, that, since promulgation of this re- casting of the Byzantine Divine Liturgy, effective June 29, 2007, many complaints have been forwarded both to the Ruthenian Byzantine Hierarchs in the United States, and to the Congregation for Eastern Churches in Rome. The hope on the part of many of the Byzantine-Ruthenian Catholic faithful, and this is not without historical precedent, is that the Congregation for Eastern Churches will take "another look" at what has been promulgated, and bring about a liturgical state of affairs in the Byzantine-Ruthenian Metropolia of Pittsburgh which is more in keeping with the mind of the Universal Church.




******************************


James Likoudis is president emeritus of CUF. His co-authored book "The Pope, the Council and the Mass: Answers to Questions the ‘Traditionalists’ Have Asked" (Revised edition, 2006) is available from Emmaus Road Publishing. To order, visit www.emmausroad.org or call (800) 398-5470. Likoudis is also the well-known author of a trilogy of books dealing with Eastern Orthodoxy.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The above article appeared in the July 23, 2009 issue of the national Catholic newspaper "The Wanderer" (201 Ohio St., St. Paul, MN 55107- Susbscription $60 a year).

******************************


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According to my inexpert calculations, Fr. Serge's 40th. day is coming right on up: on December 20, 2011. In any case that's how I marked it on the calendar.

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Originally Posted by sielos ilgesys
According to my inexpert calculations, Fr. Serge's 40th. day is coming right on up: on December 20, 2011. In any case that's how I marked it on the calendar.


Today was indeed the 40th Day after the repose of Fr Serge .

We had a Memorial Liturgy this morning in Edinburgh , followed by a Panachyda.

Kyr Hlib had come up yesterday with 4 priests from England to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of Fr Lubomyr's Priestly ordination , and it was announced that today they would remain for the 40th Day Liturgy.

Kyr Hlib [ a long time friend of Fr Serge ] spoke very movingly about him for the Homily .

It was a very moving Service

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May the Lord have mercy on his Father Serge's soul.
May his memory be eternal...


by St. John Maximovich:

Therefore, panikhidas (i.e., Trisagion Prayers for the Dead) and prayer at home for the dead are beneficial to them, as are good deeds done in their memory, such as alms or contributions to the church. But especially beneficial for them is commemoration at the Divine Liturgy. There have been many appearances of the dead and other occurrences which confirm how beneficial is the commemoration of the dead. Many who died in repentance, but who were unable to manifest this while they were alive, have been freed from tortures and have obtained repose. In the Church prayers are ever offered for the repose of the dead, and on the day of the Descent of the Holy Spirit, in the kneeling prayers at vespers, there is even a special petition "for those in hell."

Every one of us who desires to manifest his love for the dead and give them real help, can do this best of all through prayer for them, and particularly by commemorating them at the Liturgy, when the particles which are cut out for the living and the dead are let fall into the Blood of the Lord with the words: "Wash away, O Lord, the sins of those here commemorated by Thy Precious Blood and by the prayers of Thy saints."

We can do nothing better or greater for the dead than to pray for them, offering commemoration for them at the Liturgy. Of this they are always in need, and especially during those forty days when the soul of the deceased is proceeding on its path to the eternal habitations. The body feels nothing then: it does not see its close ones who have assembled, does not smell the fragrance of the flowers, does not hear the funeral orations. But the soul senses the prayers offered for it and is grateful to those who make them and is spiritually close to them.

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O Christ God, with the saints grant rest
To the soul of your servant,
In a place where there is no pain,
No grief, no sighing,
But everlasting life.

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May the memory of our beloved friend, Father Serge, be eternal.

May Anhelyna's pastor, Father Lubomyr, be blessed on the joyful occasion of his 25th anniversary of ordination to the Lord's service. May God grant him many more years in His service.


"One day all our ethnic traits ... will have disappeared. Time itself is seeing to this. And so we can not think of our communities as ethnic parishes, ... unless we wish to assure the death of our community."
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Dear friends,

We had a Pannikhida yesterday here in Singapore for Fr Serge. We found a local Franciscan friar willing to learn how to serve one, and so managed to have a 40th day service. A small congregation was also present, my family and some friends who met Fr Serge when he visited in 2000 and 2007.

Note: we were calculating 40th day after repose, counting the day of repose as day 0, giving 21st Dec as the 40th day. Is the usual custom to count the day of repose as day 1? Interestingly enough, in traditional Chinese culture, it is also the 40th day that is marked as a memorial day for the newly-departed.

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Dear Friends,

Of the pannikhida Edward mentioned above, here's a short video clip a friend of ours shot with his camera:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNFL7P0JkAk&context=C3a3679dADOEgsToPDskLg2pUFMBYO1Wh8UZhqtIwN

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Ernest and Ed,

Thanks to both of you for sharing these.

For so many of us here who knew Father Serge, whether in person or on-line, and to whom he meant so very much, it doesn't seem at all unusual that a Panakhida would be served for a Ukrainian Greek-Catholic priest of Irish-American ancestry, on an island half the world away, in a country with no historical connections to Eastern Christianity that are older than about 12 to 15 years, served by a Latin Franciscan friar, chanted by a Russian Greek-Catholic of Chinese ancestry, and prayed by a congregation that probably represented a pretty fair mix of ethnicities. I ask you, where's the surprise in any of that??

No real surprise, but not because we're jaded - rather, because it has become clear in recent years that there is indeed a genuine interest in Eastern Christanity among the faithful in places such as Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, and elsewhere in that region. That those of you who had met Father Serge or who knew him only from online cared enough for him to do this is a tribute indeed - to him and to you. I've no doubt whatsoever that he smiled down on the Panikhida and will do his very best to intercede before the Holy Throne for a mission to be established there. No, no real surprise here, but a tremendous admiration for what all of you did.

Many years,

Neil


"One day all our ethnic traits ... will have disappeared. Time itself is seeing to this. And so we can not think of our communities as ethnic parishes, ... unless we wish to assure the death of our community."
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Edward, to answer your question re counting: one generally counts the day of repose as day one, not day zero.

It is really inspiring that you assembled a community to pray for Fr Serge.

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