The Byzantine Forum
Newest Members
Augoustinos, Poliscifi, The Cub, P H, Hardrada
5604 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
1 registered members (William), 77 guests, and 457 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Latest Photos
Church of the Holy Trinity (UGCC) - Brazil
Papal Audience 10 November 2017
Upgraded Russian icon corner
Russian Greek Catholic Global Congress
OL EuroEast II (2007) Group
Forum Statistics
Forums26
Topics34,747
Posts412,017
Members5,604
Most Online2,716
Jun 7th, 2012
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 1 of 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic #406930 07/17/14 11:03 AM
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 20
Jeremiah Offline OP
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 20
My Question . . . As a Greek Orthodox Christian who is seeking to be received into the "house" of the Byzantine Catholic Church, what exactly is the process?

My general understanding is that it is relatively simple, i.e., I speak to a priest, with whom I will meet a couple times to discuss the pastoral dimension of my move. Then I give my confession of faith and receive Reconciliation, after which I will then receive the Eucharist, and then that's it. I'm Byzantine Catholic. But again, this is just my general understanding.

What I Have Done So Far . . . I am already in touch with a Byzantine (Ruthenian) Catholic priest not far from my home (southeastern Pennsylvania). Our first meeting, which took place after liturgy (I did not receive), was about an hour, and was incredibly enlightening. He essentially confirmed my general understanding of the process, which I described above.

However, he was uncertain about a possible peculiarity in the process: since I am coming from the Greek Orthodox Church (of America), and since my reception into the Catholic Church requires my enrollment in the Church sui iurus of the same Eastern liturgical rite, it is unclear if I can simply be received into any Byzantine Catholic Church generally, or if I must be received into the Greek Byzantine Catholic Church (as opposed to Ruthenian, Melkite, Ukrainian, etc.) specifically.

If a general reception is acceptable, then no worries. The process will go smoothly. But if a specific reception is required, this could present quite the problem since there are either too few or no actual Greek Byzantine Catholic churches anywhere in the United States.

Why I Am Moving To Byzantine Catholic . . . A very quick summary of my faith background: I was baptized in a liturgical Protestant tradition as a teenager. In my twenties I chose to become Greek Orthodox, where I was not baptized but received only Holy Chrismation, since my prior baptism in the Protestant tradition was recognized as valid. For the past few years, during which I have done a tremendous amount of moving due to work and family-related circumstances, my faith life has been weak and empty. In the past year, however, I have experienced a rather remarkable revival in my faith and spiritual practice. As such, I'm now eager to live out my faith more fully with a community of Christians.

I love the Eastern (Orthodox) tradition and its spirituality, and I love my Eastern Orthodox brothers and sisters. It, and they, have nurtured me in my faith and I shall never disparage them (why would I?).

That being said, I also love the Western (Catholic) tradition, and love my Catholic brothers and sisters. I am particularly moved by the witness of Pope Francis and the increasing emphasis on more bold evangelization. I am also impressed with the exceptionally positive changes taking place in so many Catholic churches.

And so, whereas I am blessed in my Eastern spirituality and at the same time am powerfully motivated to evangelization, I wish to retain my Eastern spiritual tradition while also being in communion with the Western tradition (by which I mean in communion with the Roman Catholic Church). The logical conclusion for myself, following a great deal of reflection and prayer, is to enter the "house" of the Byzantine Catholic Church.

There is also a practical matter that informs my decision. As I said earlier, I love my Eastern Orthodox brothers and sisters, and will always cherish the Greek Orthodox Church. Having said that, it has been my experience that there is a pervasive "foreign-ness" (for lack of a better term) that continues to be exhibited in so many Greek Orthodox (and other Orthodox) communities that makes it difficult for me to express a fullness of my faith in my own familiar cultural surroundings.

Where evangelization is concerned, sharing Christ in a particular socio-cultural framework can only be truly successful if the sharers can communicate in words and ways that are familiar to the hearers. In my view, the Orthodox tradition(s) here in America (God bless them!) tend to be very encapsulated and have a long way to go in learning how to effectively engage people "on the outside." Conversely, I find that the Western tradition -- which includes the Eastern churches in communion with it -- is far more embracing, and is better suited to (and already far more successful in) the task of evangelization here in this part of the United States.

I am not blind to the divisive historical, theological, and ecclesial (and, yes, certainly political) issues that exist between the Catholic and Orthodox churches. Those are issues already covered in numerous threads on this forum, and I have no desire to discuss them in any detail here. But ultimately my objective is not to "sell" any particular tradition, per se, be it Eastern or Western; nor to "sell" the Church, for that matter. The Church is our Mother, which serves to nurture us for a singular purpose: to share the Good News of freedom in Christ. And my goal is to do just that in a way that is best understood -- linguistically and culturally -- by the people I encounter in my local community and in the broader society in which I live.

Many thanks, and God bless.

JEREMIAH

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: Jeremiah] #406942 07/17/14 09:49 PM
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 689
J
jjp Offline
Member
Offline
Member
J
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 689
Advice from a current Byzantine Catholic who attended (but not joined) the Greek Orthodox Church before entering the BCC:

Be very discriminating as to the parish that you join. Some Byzantine Catholic churches are nearly indistinguishable from their Orthodox counterparts. Others, including my own, are more influenced by the unfortunate history of Roman suppression and have a "hybrid" mentality that has one foot in the Roman Catholic church and do not fully embrace the Byzantine tradition. These are mostly populated by Roman Catholics who seek to keep communion with Rome while having "the smells and bells of old" as one recruiting flyer for our church put it. If you are like me, this can be suffocating.

I definitely understand being put off by the foreign-ness of the Greek Orthodox church, however. If you don't speak Greek it can be challenging.

Have you considered the Antiochian Orthodox Church? My brother belongs to one, and while some retain their heavy Arabic influence, they are also a popular destination for evangelical converts and thus are very accessible to mainstream American sensibilities. Definitely worth checking out. I have my eye on one near where I live.

I'm also a big admirer of Pope Francis. Do consider that he wont always be Pope, however, and if the next one rubs you differently it may be difficult.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, PLEASE understand that the vocation of the Eastern Catholic churches is to work towards the healing of the schism that created their very existence, and then finally to disappear back from whence they came. It is a very specific calling that most do not understand.

I thought that I would be able to retain my Byzantine spirituality while being in happy communion with Rome, but it has not been the case for me - I am forced to choose one or the other. I genuinely hope that if you do this you can avoid a similar circumstance.

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: Jeremiah] #406952 07/18/14 09:11 AM
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 6,478
Administrator Offline
John
Member
Offline
John
Member
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 6,478
Originally Posted by Jeremiah
My Question . . . As a Greek Orthodox Christian who is seeking to be received into the "house" of the Byzantine Catholic Church, what exactly is the process?

My general understanding is that it is relatively simple, i.e., I speak to a priest, with whom I will meet a couple times to discuss the pastoral dimension of my move. Then I give my confession of faith and receive Reconciliation, after which I will then receive the Eucharist, and then that's it. I'm Byzantine Catholic. But again, this is just my general understanding.

What is the process for an Orthodox to become Byzantine Catholic?

In most places there is no process, since Orthodox are already welcome to partake of the Eucharist. I've known several Orthodox who have become Byzantine Catholic (and even Roman Catholic) simply by signing up as a member in a parish and receiving their offertory envelopes.

A discussion on the pastoral dimension of your move makes sense (and confession is always good). You need to know both what you are embracing and what you are leaving behind.

Yes, technically you become a member of the Greek Byzantine Catholic Church (even if you are received by a Melkite, Roman or any Catholic priest). But you are always free to join any Catholic parish there and worship for as long as you like. You certainly can do the paperwork to join another Byzantine Catholic Church (i.e., Melkite, Ruthenian, Ukrainian, Romanian), but it is not necessary.

God bless!

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: jjp] #406957 07/18/14 11:29 AM
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 20
Jeremiah Offline OP
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 20
Thanks for your reply, jjp.

Regarding the Antiochian Orthodox Church, while I have visited a number of them in the past with friends during my more active years in the Greek Orthodox Church, moving to that particular Orthodox tradition is not something I would consider. Again, my core objective is missional, namely to fulfill the Christian evangelistic purpose in a way that can be most effectively communicated and understood in my culture and society. As I see it, and as my reflection and prayers have led me, the Catholic Church is best suited to most effectively fulfilling that purpose here in this culture and society (i.e., the Eastern U.S., generally).

This isn't to say that the Eastern Orthodox traditions do not have value, or do not have purpose here in the United States. They certainly do, as my own personal experience can testify to. However, their value -- and indeed their sacred place in the "one holy, catholic, and apostolic church" -- notwithstanding, they are far less effective in evangelistic outreach here in the U.S. than the Catholic Church.

The Orthodox Churches were originally established here in the U.S. to serve Christians from non-western cultures (largely from eastern Europe, southeastern Europe, and the eastern Mediterranean) who emigrated to the United States. Those Orthodox churches then became key cultural havens supporting certain ethnic communities (Greeks, Russians, Lebanese, etc.). Now, while the Catholic Church also did this when first coming to America (such as in serving immigrant communities from Ireland, Italy, Spain, and so on), it was far more successful in assimilating into American culture than the Orthodox churches have been. And in many cases -- though perhaps with the arguable exception of the Orthodox Church in America (OCA) -- Orthodox communities here in the United States still retain a heavy ethnic cultural focus and identity which, while a blessing, nonetheless has the effect of too often being far more out of touch with the broader American culture than the Catholic Church.

Now, while the Byzantine Catholic churches here in the U.S. certainly retain a great deal of their own various cultural identities -- and, for sure, some to a larger degree than others, as you mentioned -- they have a unique advantage in their communion with the Roman Catholic Church, as far as I see it. The complexities of history being what they are (which may or may not include your view of the "schism healing" vocation of the Eastern Catholic churches), I've nonetheless discovered that they've learned how to better integrate themselves into American culture than their Eastern Orthodox counterparts, and largely as a blessed consequence of their communion with the RCC. And this is key when considering the centrality of the Christian evangelistic mission.

So again, the missional aspect of my faith is what primarily informs my decision. And you're right, Pope Francis will not always be Pope. But he is the light that is shining right now, and I have seen it and thereby have chosen to respond accordingly. And yes, church communities can be messy on several levels, both on the local and larger scale. But that's just part of the nature (at least in this current age) of being human. But in so being human and at the same time Christian, my singular aim should be to serve the will of God, not my own.

Thanks, and God bless.

JEREMIAH

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: Administrator] #406958 07/18/14 11:50 AM
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 20
Jeremiah Offline OP
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 20
Thanks for your reply, Administrator (John?).

What actually led me to take the Byzantine Catholic "route of entry" is an experience I had relatively recently in speaking to a Roman Catholic priest about my being received into the Catholic Church. After an excellent discussion, he informed me that I would have to go through RCIA and then be received at next year's Easter vigil. I was, to say the least, dumbfounded at the thought of having to wait nearly a full year to receive the eucharist. I'm already catholic in faith, and it was my understanding that reception for Eastern Orthodox Christians into the Catholic Church is quite simple and not at all time consuming (and in fact shouldn't be, according to my understanding of Church policy on such matters).

So, much like the account in Mark 2:1-5, since I could not get in through the "front door" of the house where Jesus is, I'm trying to break in "through the roof." And for the same reasons as the paralytic in that passage: I'm eager to come to Jesus and receive his grace.

Anyway, from what I gathered in my conversation with the Byzantine Catholic priest I spoke with, my process of reception will very likely not take long at all. Due to some schedule and travel issues on my end, and some general administrative issues on his and the Eparchy's end, I'm suspecting the process will probably only take perhaps only a couple more weeks from this point. It sure beats having to wait nearly a full year.

Thanks, and God bless.

JEREMIAH

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: Jeremiah] #406960 07/18/14 12:42 PM
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 44
2
2lungsambassador Offline
Member
Offline
Member
2
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 44
Jeremiah,

I wish you well in your journey and I am sure it is not without doubts and regrets. Having gone through a similar journey not too long ago I will risk making a few observations, knowing that each experience is unique. I too went from Protestant to Orthodox--I was searching for the "original" Church. Years went by and I was drawn back to the faith of my mother's people. My wife (who was originally Roman Catholic, then Protestant, then Orthodox) and I came to the conclusion that we were definitely done with active participation in the Orthodox Church. We revere the Eastern worship and reverence, but never felt at home there. (That doesn't do justice to the full experience of course, but that will have to do for the sake of brevity.) Although the Catholic Church accepts the validity of Orthodox sacraments, we also knew that if we received the Eucharist while still Orthodox we were essentially excommunicating ourselves from Orthodox communion, so we fully submitted to the authority of the Church in communion with Rome. We had to work through canonical issues of marriage first, then she had to go to confession. I was received into the Church as a Melkite since I was chrismated in the Antiochian Orthodox Church. (Side note: I had to fight to be received by the proper Eastern Church as the canon lawyer was mistaken about which Antiochian body in communion with Rome was the correct one.) I then chose to petition both the Melkite exarch and the local Latin ordinary to change my ascription. I could have just had the closest Melkite priest enroll me but I chose to do it the way I did because I felt the call to be Latin. (I am French-Canadian on my mother's side.) Bottom line: you may have to educate yourself and advocate for yourself. Don't be afraid to pester (respectfully, of course) the requisite authorities. A change like this should involve some risk and effort. Finally: try not to fall into the trap of "finding the perfect--or ideal--Church." There have been many times I have missed the reverence of Orthodoxy and I am not as sanguine about Pope Francis as you...but he's the pope. Being Latin Catholic is an exercise in humility, but we have to be in it for the long game.

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: 2lungsambassador] #406966 07/18/14 08:00 PM
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 20
Jeremiah Offline OP
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 20
Hello 2lungsambassador.

Thanks for your well wishes.

As for doubts and regrets, I can honestly say I have none. As far as I'm concerned I'm neither "leaving" Orthodoxy nor "becoming" Catholic, per se. My faith is catholic no matter if my communion resides in the west or the east. The Church is the Church, and I confess the very same faith as every member of the Church family:

Quote
"I believe ... in one holy, catholic, and apostolic church."

My decision to engage my worship life in the Byzantine Catholic Church is both holistic and practical. Holistic in that the BCC possesses the great depth of eastern spirituality while also being advantaged by the influence of western openness and evangelistic passion; Practical in that being in communion with my Catholic brothers and sisters affords me expansive opportunities to work with them in the increased evangelism Pope Francis has boldly called for.

And I agree with you wholeheartedly. There is no perfect or ideal church community. That's been the case from the very beginning: the apostles were always bickering, arguing, competing, etc. What a mess they were. Yet they're who Jesus chose. So I suppose if I ever do feel I've found the "perfect" community, then I should perhaps be worried.

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: Jeremiah] #406986 07/20/14 06:11 AM
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,712
T
The young fogey Offline
Member
Offline
Member
T
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,712
I came back because the Catholic Church includes the East but the Orthodox don't really include the West. In a way the Catholic Church includes the Orthodox, and not vice versa.

I love both the unlatinized forms of the Byzantine Rite and the old latinized forms. Both exist in the church, as they should.

My understanding is you don't have to be received by a Greek Byzantine Catholic priest. Any Catholic priest can receive you, but you would automatically be a Greek Byzantine Catholic canonically. Because you were baptized Protestant, some might say you would belong to the Latin Church, but I'll assume not. The late forum member Fr. Serge (Keleher) was born Roman Rite but, a Russian Orthodox priest, got to come back as a Russian Catholic priest.

Catholics unofficially move between "particular churches" all the time. Ukrainian Catholics move away from their old neighborhood to a place with only a Roman Rite church so they go there without officially switching; conservative Roman Riters getting away from liberal parishes, and those who feel called to the East, likewise move over. Officially switching only becomes an issue if you marry or are being ordained. So being Greek Byzantine Catholic and joining a Ukrainian parish for example is no problem.

Also, I think reception is easy for ex-Orthodox. Simply receiving Communion here makes you a Catholic; that's certainly how the Orthodox see it. Best answer, I think, to make it official is to tell the Catholic priest what you want to do and go to confession or just make a profession of faith, and you're in!

Making you go through RCIA and waiting a year like the Protestants taking instruction sounds like that tiresome refrain, the priest is ignorant of the Eastern churches and how to handle possible conversions like yours.

Anyway, life and people in the Catholic Church aren't perfect ("sinners of whom I am the first"; "I'd refuse to join any club that would take me as a member") but it is the church.

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: The young fogey] #407000 07/21/14 08:39 AM
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,431
Peter J Offline
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,431
Originally Posted by The young fogey
I came back because the Catholic Church includes the East but the Orthodox don't really include the West.

I hate to say "That's not a good basis for choosing which communion to belong to [Linked Image]" ... but, well, this definitely seems like the time to say it. [Linked Image]

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: Jeremiah] #407008 07/21/14 07:53 PM
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,712
T
The young fogey Offline
Member
Offline
Member
T
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,712
Standard reaction on this board. To be fair, the Episcopalians include the East too. But it's not the same of course.

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: Peter J] #407009 07/21/14 08:26 PM
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,431
Peter J Offline
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,431
Originally Posted by Peter J
Originally Posted by The young fogey
I came back because the Catholic Church includes the East but the Orthodox don't really include the West.

I hate to say "That's not a good basis for choosing which communion to belong to [Linked Image]" ... but, well, this definitely seems like the time to say it. [Linked Image]

I may have been a bit undiplomatic this morning. Sorry about that. I could say that it is as good as saying: the Roman Communion is the true church because it has the most members, or the most power, or the most money. smile

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: Peter J] #407010 07/21/14 08:40 PM
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 20
Jeremiah Offline OP
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 20
Whatever any individual's reason for choosing communion with the Catholics or the Orthodox, I'm sure we can all safely assume it's personal and therefore subjective (some people make the choice for doctrinal or theological reasons; others for cultural or family reasons; others for marital reasons; the list goes on). As such, we should be reticent to claim there are "good" reasons or "bad" reasons for such choices. One's reasons are what they are.

Having said that, I must say that I have discovered far greater charity in the Catholic Church than with the Eastern Orthodox when it comes to ecumenism. And so there's some truth in what [u]The young fogey[/u] wrote: "[i]the Catholic Church includes the East but the Orthodox don't really include the West.[/i]" With perhaps some extremely minor exceptions, we don't really see any Western/Latin rite Orthodox churches. This in contrast to Catholicism, which "includes" the East far more charitably than the East "includes" the West.

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: Jeremiah] #407013 07/22/14 03:31 AM
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 1,206
L
likethethief Offline
Member
Offline
Member
L
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 1,206
Originally Posted by Jeremiah

What actually led me to take the Byzantine Catholic "route of entry" is an experience I had relatively recently in speaking to a Roman Catholic priest about my being received into the Catholic Church. After an excellent discussion, he informed me that I would have to go through RCIA and then be received at next year's Easter vigil.


Originally Posted by The young fogey

Making you go through RCIA and waiting a year like the Protestants taking instruction sounds like that tiresome refrain,


Christians wishing to come into full communion with the Catholic Church need only have enough instruction to come to the point where they and their catechist and priest determine they are ready to be received into the Church. The Rite of Reception of Baptized Christians into the full Communion of the Catholic Church may take place at any Mass, including a daily Mass, and in extraordinary circumstances need not even take place in a Mass. The Easter Vigil is really intended for the Celebration of the Sacraments of Initiation of unbaptized persons, although there is the option of having the Rite of Reception of Baptized Christians at the Easter Vigil.

Quote
Those baptized persons who have lived as Christians and need only instruction in the Catholic tradition and a degree of probation within the Catholic community should not be asked to undergo a full program parallel to the catechumenate" (NSC 31). For this reason they should not share in the same, full RCIA programs that catechumens do.


Quote
[t]he reception of candidates into the communion of the Catholic Church should ordinarily take place at the Sunday Eucharist of the parish community, in such a way that it is understood that they are indeed Christian believers who have already shared in the sacramental life of the Church and are now welcomed into the Catholic Eucharistic community . . . " (NSC 32).


Quote
It is preferable that reception into full communion not take place at the Easter Vigil lest there be any confusion of such baptized Christians with the candidates for baptism, possible misunderstanding of or even reflection upon the sacrament of baptism celebrated in another Church or ecclesial community . . . (NSC 33).


NSC is National Statutes for the Catechumenate set out by the US Bishops. The priest you spoke with in the Latin Church may have decided to deviate from the US Bishops desire, as have many parish priests and their Director of Religious Education. But that is not what the NSC states. Any validly baptized Christian is to be received as soon as possible as indicated in NSC 31 quoted above.

There is no formal liturgical Rite for Orthodox Christians coming into full communion. Jeremiah would certainly not be confirmed/chrismated. He would be received by confession, recitation of the Creed, and Holy Eucharist. The question is only in which Catholic Church he would be ascribed.

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: The young fogey] #407014 07/22/14 03:53 AM
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 1,206
L
likethethief Offline
Member
Offline
Member
L
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 1,206
Originally Posted by The young fogey
Because you were baptized Protestant, some might say you would belong to the Latin Church,


That would be me smile or I would at the very least think it is quite possible. I think Jeremiah and the Byzantine priest should consult with the local canon law office.

A Christian, ie someone who as been validly baptized, regardless of whether they are received into the Catholic Church by Chrismation in an Eastern Catholic Church is ascribed as Latin Catholic. Fr. George Gallaro, whose doctorate is in Eastern canon law, is a professor of canon law and ecumenism at the Byzantine Catholic Seminary of Ss. Cyril and Methodius. He discussed this Church Ascription Upon Conversion in the "Word From the Wise" blog.

Having become Christian by baptism in a western ecclesial community/Protestant church it is not clear that having been Chrismated into the Greek Orthodox Church would be different from having been received into the Catholic Church by Chrismation in an Eastern Catholic Church, in the later case one would be ascribed Latin Catholic.

I think a change in church sui juris for someone who was living as a Greek Orthodox would be relatively simple once they're Catholic.

Since there are areas where there are important differences in Canon Law which depend on whether one is canonically Latin or canonically another Church I do think OP should consult the chancery and get the advise of their canonists. smile

Re: Greek Orthodox to Byzantine Catholic [Re: likethethief] #407015 07/22/14 06:41 AM
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,712
T
The young fogey Offline
Member
Offline
Member
T
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,712
Originally Posted by likethethief
I think a change in church sui juris for someone who was living as a Greek Orthodox would be relatively simple once they're Catholic.

I think and hope so. And if marriage or ordination doesn't come up, it might not matter. Just go to an Eastern church.

Page 1 of 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Moderated by  Alice, Father Deacon Ed, theophan 

The Byzantine Forum provides message boards for discussions focusing on Eastern Christianity (though discussions of other topics are welcome). The views expressed herein are those of the participants and may or may not reflect the teachings of the Byzantine Catholic or any other Church. The Byzantine Forum and the www.byzcath.org site exist to help build up the Church but are unofficial, have no connection with any Church entity, and should not be looked to as a source for official information for any Church. All posts become property of byzcath.org. Contents copyright - 1996-2019 (Forum 1998-2019). All rights reserved.
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.3