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Liturgy in the Vernacular #418029 02/26/18 02:27 AM
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Fr. Al Online Content OP
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I may have asked this before. I am an amateur linguist, who has dabbled in every Eastern European language from Finnish in the North to Greek in the South. I am unaware of the St. John Chrysostom Liturgy being translated either into Slovenian or either of the two Wendish/Serbian languages of Germany. It's quite possible that the Serbian church has done a Slovenian translation. I have yet to see it.

Re: Liturgy in the Vernacular [Re: Fr. Al] #418420 07/27/18 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Fr. Al
I may have asked this before. I am an amateur linguist, who has dabbled in every Eastern European language from Finnish in the North to Greek in the South. I am unaware of the St. John Chrysostom Liturgy being translated either into Slovenian or either of the two Wendish/Serbian languages of Germany. It's quite possible that the Serbian church has done a Slovenian translation. I have yet to see it.


I think you may have Sorbian in mind. No, I'm not aware of any translations.

While not Eastern European, one of my favourite translations is into Anglish: The Worshipform of Hl. Johannes Chrysostomos.

Re: Liturgy in the Vernacular [Re: Fr. Al] #418642 11/14/18 05:59 PM
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Fr. Al Online Content OP
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I DID have Sorbian in mind. However, they do call themselves Serbs in their own two literary languages. I tried to track down a Sloven translation, but invariably I get led to Slovak.

Re: Liturgy in the Vernacular [Re: Fr. Al] #418643 11/14/18 06:00 PM
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Fr. Al Online Content OP
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SLOVENE, rather.

Re: Liturgy in the Vernacular [Re: Fr. Al] #418646 11/14/18 10:32 PM
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Interestingly the only Wends to arrive in the US settled in the town of Serbin in Texas. However, they were Lutheran with some interesting variations in customs. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wends_of_Texas

Re: Liturgy in the Vernacular [Re: Fr. Al] #418647 11/14/18 10:55 PM
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Fr. Al Online Content OP
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There are other Wendish settlements in Texas; though Serbin is the best known. There are some Catholic Wends here as well. In Texas, some Lutheran Wends ended up in German churches. If any Catholic Wends ended up in the Czech parishes there, I haven't heard of them.
There are also the Windish people here in PA, in Bethlehem. They are Lutherans, but from Hungary. Their language is a dialect of Slovene, which used to be written with Hungarian phonetics. I'm trying to find out more about them.

Re: Liturgy in the Vernacular [Re: Fr. Al] #418665 12/03/18 03:53 AM
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The Lutheran Wends may have ended up in the Slovak Zion Synod, which is the only non-geographic Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and one which is slowly assimilating to English.

Re: Liturgy in the Vernacular [Re: Fr. Al] #418666 12/03/18 03:03 PM
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Fr. Al Online Content OP
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But Texas has relatively few Slovaks, but many Czechs and Germans. The Windish people in Bethlehem, PA, on the other hand, are a totally different breed. They came from Hungary, they used to publish their own paper in Bethlehem, using their unique Slovene dialect written in the Hungarian orthography! Needless to say, almost nobody left in that group speaks Slovene or Hungarian.
Here in PA, we have the largest group of Slovaks outside of Slovakia. Yet, it is almost impossible for me to find anyone that speaks Slovak. Occasionally. I meet with a group in this area to practice my Slovak. They are mostly Czechs and mostly new arrivals.


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