The Byzantine Forum
Newest Members
BrotherIsaac, SeekingLight, NoTrueScotsman, Soraya, CuriousMarten
5,759 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
3 members (Fr. Al, Irish Melkite, 1 invisible), 112 guests, and 43 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Latest Photos
Church of St Cyril of Turau & All Patron Saints of Belarus
Byzantine Nebraska
Byzantine Nebraska
by orthodoxsinner2, December 11
Church of the Holy Trinity (UGCC) - Brazil
Church of the Holy Trinity (UGCC) - Brazil
by Santiago Tarsicio, March 17
Papal Audience 10 November 2017
Papal Audience 10 November 2017
by JLF, November 10
Upgraded Russian icon corner
Upgraded Russian icon corner
by The young fogey, October 20
Forum Statistics
Forums26
Topics35,045
Posts413,994
Members5,759
Most Online3,380
Dec 29th, 2019
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
#421477 09/14/21 01:30 PM
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 2,128
Likes: 6
ajk Offline OP
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 2,128
Likes: 6
"... presided at a long service known as a Divine Liturgy, a Byzantine rite used by Eastern Catholic and Orthodox Churches." Pope, in Slovakia, says don't exploit religion for politics

Not in Church Slavonic (though the ear still picks up its influence in parts) but the Prostopinije is unmistakable and beautiful.

14 September 2021, Prešov-Byzantine Divine Liturgy, Pope Francis

Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 6,775
Likes: 11
Moderator
Member
Offline
Moderator
Member
Joined: Nov 2002
Posts: 6,775
Likes: 11
Christ is in our midst!!

Is the Prostopinije musical form still used in the Byzantine Catholic Church here in the United States? I remember reading that Metropolitan Nicholas of ACROD promoted that form in the ACROD and had visited some of the Greek Catholic Churches in Slovakia where it was used.

Joined: May 2007
Posts: 2,128
Likes: 6
ajk Offline OP
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 2,128
Likes: 6
Originally Posted by theophan
Christ is in our midst!!

Is the Prostopinije musical form still used in the Byzantine Catholic Church here in the United States? I remember reading that Metropolitan Nicholas of ACROD promoted that form in the ACROD and had visited some of the Greek Catholic Churches in Slovakia where it was used.
Yes. From what I've heard, even during the period of the most aggressive latinizations, prostopinije (Carpathian plainchant) endured. See the Metropolitan Cantor Institute (MCI) and the numerous services indexed in the Liturgical Calendar for the Year of Grace 2021. Among the Publications of the Byzantine Catholic Church is the pdf download The Divine Liturgies of our Holy Fathers John Chrysostom and Basil the Great, including common chants for Vespers but not the Liturgy of the Presanctified. The Prešov and Mukachevo (favored at the MCI) traditions are different but overllaping expressions.

Joined: May 2007
Posts: 2,128
Likes: 6
ajk Offline OP
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 2,128
Likes: 6
The Hymn Beneath your compassion [Подъ твою милость, Pod Tvou Milost] is sung at 2:03:34; it is in the Pew Book, p. 454. Bishop (of Passaic) Kurt has specifically asked that it be sung after our liturgies. Fr. Jack Cuser recorded it for us at Beneath Your Compassion -- Rev John Custer.

"Beneath Your Compassion" is the oldest Marian hymn except for the "Hail Mary" which is from the New Testament. The Holy Father, Pope Francis, has asked that it be prayed at the end of every Mass and Divine Liturgy in the Catholic Church. The music is on page 454 of the pew book of the Metropolia of Pittsburgh. Here it is sung by Very Rev. John Custer, SSL STD, the Rector of St. Michael Cathedral in Passaic, New Jersey. The icon in the video is on the iconostasis of St. Michael Cathedral Chapel in Woodland Park, New Jersey and was written by Mme. Christina Dochwat of Philadelphia."

It is also well-know in the West; Sub tuum praesidium.

Last edited by ajk; 09/14/21 08:32 PM.
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 2,128
Likes: 6
ajk Offline OP
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 2,128
Likes: 6
Upon a more thorough listening, and as my son points out to me:
Quote
There was quite a bit of Slavonic.

Litany between first and second antiphons 18:19
We bow to your cross 29:46
Cherubic Hymn 1:04:20
Holy, holy, holy 1:16:16 until
We praise you 1:19:52
Litany 1:25:55
One is holy 1:31:24
Beneath your cross I stand 1:36:31
Litany 1:49:40

And of course
Beneath your compassion 2:03:30

Joined: May 2007
Posts: 2,128
Likes: 6
ajk Offline OP
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 2,128
Likes: 6
Had to delete this, posted before, now corrected (I hope).

In the video, the Our Father is chanted at 1:29:03 and uses Tone 7, the tone of the week, as it was this past Sunday in our US parishes. It sounds to me like the Tone 7 Kontakion melody, a Resurrectional Tone. The noted music and English is in that pdf (the Pew Book) I linked, on page 157. That melody is one that is a podoben (model) for other prayers, for instance, the Hymn of the Incarnation at page 19-20 in the Pew Book. So, is it a popular default melody that just happened to coincide with the tone of the week or is it a Prešov custom to chant the Our Father to some form of the tone of the week? In the Mukachevo tradition, it is a custom to chant the Our Father in the tone of the week but using the Samholasen/Vesper tones not a Resurrectional tone. That Samholasen melody is in the Pew Book on page 72 (and pages 154-156).

Prostopinije Tone 1 Troparion is at 28:13 followed by the Tone 4 Doxology and Kontakion. In Englishthese are on pages 254-255 of the Pew Book. The Hymn of the Incarnation in the video at 20:32 sounds like the music for the Great Vespers Hymn of Glorification, "Make us worthy," aka "Vouchsafe, O Lord" (Spodobi Hospodi) on p. 451 of the Pew Book.

Joined: May 2007
Posts: 2,128
Likes: 6
ajk Offline OP
Member
OP Offline
Member
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 2,128
Likes: 6
.. and I'd add Hungary too: 12 September 2021, Budapest, Holy Mass - Pope Francis. It's a Roman rite Mass but there is an Eastern/Byzantine and Ecumenical presence. I grew up in a Hungarian Roman-rite parish (50s-60s) and one of my fondest recollections is of the "Hungarian," i.e. the Sunday High Mass: Right after it concluded the Hungarian National Anthem was sung. Appropriately, it is a prayer, and is even called the Hymn, Himnusz. The opening words are Isten, áldd meg a Magyart (pronounced ma-jart), God bless the Hungarian-people. So I checked the video and it was indeed sung at 1:45:55. For me, both because of its pious words, addressing its cultural heritage and religious devotion, and its noble melody, it ranks at the very top as a historically-Christian nation's anthem. During its singing, the video appropriately shows a replica of the "Crown of St. Stephan", Holy Crown of Hungary. As explained in the link, It has an interesting connection with the US:
Quote
At the end of the Second World War the crown jewels were recovered in Mattsee, Austria, on 4 May 1945 by the U.S. 86th Infantry Division.[14] The crown jewels were transported to Western Europe and eventually given to the United States Army by the Hungarian Crown Guard for safekeeping from the Soviet Union.[15] For much of the Cold War the crown was held at the United States Bullion Depository (Fort Knox, Kentucky) alongside the bulk of America's gold reserves and other priceless historical items. After undergoing extensive historical research to verify the crown as genuine, it was returned to Hungary by order of U.S. President Jimmy Carter on 6 January 1978.[16]

Most current academic knowledge about Hungarian royal garments originates from this modern research. Following substantial U.S. political debate, the agreement to return the jewels contained many conditions to ensure the people of Hungary, rather than its Communist government, took possession of the jewels.[16] The majority of the Hungarian-American population opposed the decision to return the crown.[17] On January 6, 1978, US Secretary of State Cyrus Vance returned the Crown to Hungary in Budapest.[18]

I remember the controversy about Pres. Carter's decision at the time but, thankfully, it has turned out well.


Moderated by  Father Anthony 

Link Copied to Clipboard
The Byzantine Forum provides message boards for discussions focusing on Eastern Christianity (though discussions of other topics are welcome). The views expressed herein are those of the participants and may or may not reflect the teachings of the Byzantine Catholic or any other Church. The Byzantine Forum and the www.byzcath.org site exist to help build up the Church but are unofficial, have no connection with any Church entity, and should not be looked to as a source for official information for any Church. All posts become property of byzcath.org. Contents copyright - 1996-2020 (Forum 1998-2020). All rights reserved.
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5