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#47245 06/14/05 01:08 PM
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It took me long enough, but I finally managed!
As far as I know, there are no reproductions available of this icon, and I never found any images on the net. So eventually I just went to the Byzantine chapel in Fatima and took some photographs of my own, had them edited and straightened out here at the magazine I work for, and asked a friend to put the best one on-line.
Today I managed to shrink it so that I can use it as an Avatar.
I thought you might be interested in seeing it. For a "larger than avatar" image you can try:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v653/pipos/blogsantiago.jpg
I have high definition images as well, in case anybody wants them.
Our Lady of Fatima, pray for us!
Filipe

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Dear Filipe:

Can you give us a brief sketch on the origins of the Icon of Our Lady of Fatima?

Was the writer an Eastern or Western iconographer?

Thanks.

Amado

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I for one have asked the leadership of Our Lady of fatima Russian Catholic parish to produce one for commercial sale. So far nothing yet.
Stephanos I

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I am afraid I cannot provide you with much more info. I am pretty sure that it was written by an Eastern Iconogrpher, specially since the writing is in Cyrillic. But I am guessing.

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I LOVE IT!

Does anyone know what the words say? I notice that there are more words on top, but has been cut off?

Also, I've seen an Icon of the Divine Mercy, in a very pure Byzantine style (not the "modern" style by this unusual icon company, I forgot the name of it).

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It is lovely.

Just for fun, I plugged in 'Russian icon of Our Lady of Fatima' this is what I found out of San Francisco, it shows a large portion of the icon on its home page.

Out in the Avenues, in the middle of San Franciscos Richmond District, sits the Byzantine Catholic Russian Center/Our Lady of Fatima Byzantine Catholic Parish, at the corner of 20th Avenue and Lake Street. Once an old mansion, it was converted for parish use in 1945, and we have been here ever since.

We are a parish of the Archdiocese of San Francisco, and an apostolate of the Society of Jesus. For almost 40 years, we have functioned as both an educational center and a parish community. In the words of St. Basil, we pray that the Lord will preserve this holy house unto the end of the world.
http://www.byzantinecatholic.org/

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Dear Friends,

FYI, that icon is available at the Russian Catholic Chapel's bookstore and through the Blue Army, at least last time I checked.

The lettering at the top says, "Icon of the Fatima Theotokos."

This is a classical "Oranta" type icon of the Theotokos based on the Ascension prototype where the Mother of God is seen raising her arms up to the ascending Christ.

The most famous Oranta icon is that in Kyiv's Sophia Cathedral, the "Unmoveable Wall" which is miraculous.

That icon has an embroidered cloth on Our Lady's belt.

The people of Kyiv have always said that Our Lady uses that cloth to wipe away the tears of all those who come before her to invoke her help in their necessitites.

Alex

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As a former pilgrim to Fatima, I love that icon! I have a copy of it in my prayer corner at home.

Our Lady, Thetokos of Fatima, pray for us!

Gordo

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Thank you all for adding important information.
I have asked several times at the shop of the Blue Army residence in Ftima and not only do they not have copies but always seem amazed that I should even ask. It is great to know that there are copies available! Any idea if I could order one?
Also, would the one in Ftima be the original? or a copy? In which case, where is the original?

Filipe

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I just looked in the current Blue Army catalog, and it's not there.

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Quote
Originally posted by Pani Rose:
It is lovely.

Just for fun, I plugged in 'Russian icon of Our Lady of Fatima' this is what I found out of San Francisco, it shows a large portion of the icon on its home page.

Out in the Avenues, in the middle of San Franciscos Richmond District, sits the Byzantine Catholic Russian Center/Our Lady of Fatima Byzantine Catholic Parish, at the corner of 20th Avenue and Lake Street. Once an old mansion, it was converted for parish use in 1945, and we have been here ever since.

We are a parish of the Archdiocese of San Francisco, and an apostolate of the Society of Jesus. For almost 40 years, we have functioned as both an educational center and a parish community. In the words of St. Basil, we pray that the Lord will preserve this holy house unto the end of the world.
http://www.byzantinecatholic.org/
Did you notice that they celebrate Pascha on the same day that the Orthodox do?

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Dear Elizabeth Maria,

Don't all EC's celebrate on the Orthodox Pascha?

Alex

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Ah, yes, the Fatimskaya icon. I too love this icon.

The first time I saw the Fatimskaya was in a special issue of SOUL magazine. It shows the late founder of the Blue Army, Monsigner Harold Colgan, holding it in his hands. (I have the image as a JPEG, but am unable to upload it to this post)

The first time I saw the Fatimskaya icon in person was during my first visit to Our Lady of Fatima Russian Byzantine Catholic Church in San Fransicso in 1995. At the time, the parish bookstore did sell holy card versions of the icon, however, I didn't see anymore of them at my last visit three years ago.

As to the origins of the Fatimskaya icon, here is what I have collected from personal research:

"The titilar eikon of the center, Our Lady of Fatima, is a contemporary work, executed in Paris according to the classic canons of Russian eikon painting, that is to say, applying egg tempura to a carefully prepared wood surface. Our Lady appearing to the three children in the elongated hieratic form associated with high Russian iconographic art." - The Russian Catholic Center in San Francisco, California, Eastern Churches Quarterly

So, according to the article, the icon was written in Paris according to the traditional manner.

Here is more info about the icon from the booklet, Welcome to the Byzantine-Russian Catholic Chapel in Fatima, written by the late Mitred Archimandrite John Mowatt, former rector of the Byzantine Chapel at Fatima:

"This particualr icon is of an ancient Russian source and in copying the icon the artist just added the figures of the three Seers, Lucia, Francisco, and Jacinta. It is interesting to note here that the Russian Church already had an icon of the Most Holy Virgin Mary, clothed in white, and appearing on top of a tree as she radiated and drew the peoples of the world towards her. This is more than just a mere coincidence as, generally speaking, most Russian and other Byzantine icons of Our Lady always portray her as holding the Divine Child."

According to this article, another icon served as the basis for the Fatimskaya. From my research, that "ancient icon" of the Theotokos appearing in white above a tree was a variant of the "Joy of All Who Sorrow" icon.

Below is a version of the "Joy of All Who Sorrow" Icon".
[Linked Image]


Notice the position of Christ above Mary. He is depicted much like on the Fatimskaya. Also, notice the similarities of the people on both sides of the Theotokos. Again, much like the Fatimskaya.

Unfortunately, there is no mention of who the iconographer was, and Archminadrite John passed away before I could contact about it.

I hope this helps.

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Originally posted by Stephanos I:
I for one have asked the leadership of Our Lady of fatima Russian Catholic parish to produce one for commercial sale. So far nothing yet.
Stephanos I
I too have e-mailed them in the past about that, but have never received a reply.

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Originally posted by Filipe YTOL:

Also, would the one in Ftima be the original? or a copy? In which case, where is the original?

Filipe
I am guessing that the icon of Our Lady of Fatima at OLF Russian Catholic Church in San Francisco is the original since the parish was dedicated on October 13th 1956, while the Russian Byzantine Chapel at Fatima was dedicated on August 28th, 1963.

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There are variations of the Fatimskaya icon.

Here is one from www.stmichaelruscath.org/outbound/incommunion/poland.htm

[Linked Image]

There is another variant that is commercially available from the 101 Foundation:

[Linked Image]

You can order it here: www.101foundation.com/item474.html

A group of Catholic pilgrims to Moscow presented a copy of the above icon to a Russian Orthodox bishop at the Epiphany Patriarchal Cathedral in Moscow. You can read about that in the book, Finally, Russia!, also available from the 101 Foundation.

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Hello!
Great to finally have some news of the origins of the Icon.
Griego, I am so sorry that I didn't receive your PM a few days earlier as I went to visit the Chapel last Wednsday, and I don't go that often. I am pretty sure, however, that I have some more photographs somewhere of the interior of the chapel, I'll try to locate them and share them on this topic.
Since I opened this topic I grew tired of waiting and finally printed out a copy of the Icon and took it to some Dominican Nuns in Lisbon who make reproductions of Icons. They made it for me and it came out very well. I had it made to give some friends, since it worked out so well I am now going to order some more for myself and other friends.
Griego, the high resolution image I have is really very large. I believe it's about 17mb. I have it on a CD at home, I'll confirm and let you know. If I don't get back to you next week then remind me. I don't think it would be easy to mail, but maybe we could try some other way.
Filipe

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Yes, yes, I know, I know, I have resuscitated an 8-year-old thread! shocked grin

8 years ago, I wrote the following:

Quote
Here is more info about the icon from the booklet, Welcome to the Byzantine-Russian Catholic Chapel in Fatima, written by the late Mitred Archimandrite John Mowatt, former rector of the Byzantine Chapel at Fatima:

"This particualr icon is of an ancient Russian source and in copying the icon the artist just added the figures of the three Seers, Lucia, Francisco, and Jacinta. It is interesting to note here that the Russian Church already had an icon of the Most Holy Virgin Mary, clothed in white, and appearing on top of a tree as she radiated and drew the peoples of the world towards her. This is more than just a mere coincidence as, generally speaking, most Russian and other Byzantine icons of Our Lady always portray her as holding the Divine Child."


Recently in looking through this online directory of icons, I came across this icon:

[Linked Image]
It certainly seems to match Fr. Mowatt's description of the icon that served as the basis for the Fatimskaya.

Video.

Description of the icon.

The icon is also painted on the sanctuary wall of the church. :

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The description in Russian, if I may give my translation, says that the spot where the Mother of God appeared is in Kiselev in Luhansk (where my mother's family heralds from).

Two hundred years ago there was a small grove of five oak trees through which a miracle-working stream passed and a blind boy was cured there.

In 1924, pilgrims came to the spot again where only the stump of one of the oak trees remained. There they prayed and miracles occurred. Daily, more than two thousand pilgrims came there to sing canons and akathists to the Mother of God.

In 1979, an image of the Cross appeared there on the stump beside an icon of Christ. It is said that the Mother of God herself protects the spot.

Alex

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Sad to say they do not in the US and in Slovakia. It may be weird along the Slovak Ukraine border where the Rusyn eparchies were split from each other after the war.Not all Slovak Greek Catholics in Slovakia are on the western Paschalion though. The local BCC pastor used to serve a village in Slovakia with two Greek Catholic parishes, one all Gregorian calendar, the other all Julian calender including the Orthodox Paschalon. This year the current priest in that village would have started the Triodon in early January and will celebrate Pentecost this Sunday - nearly six months!

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^ The Android gods apparently apparently sent this post to the wrong thread. Sorry.

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My cromulent posts embiggen this forum.
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An interesting piece along with an interesting effort to.make some mutually acceptable peace out of Fatima. Sadly, I will argue that the effort was in vain as the harsh ideologues of Roman Catholicism and Orthodoxy have created their own immutable charicatures and versions of Fatima for their own purposes. The sincere and spiritual efforts of the priest and iconographer are valiant, but perhaps they should collaborate on a less divisive concept in the same spirit?

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Originally Posted by griego catolico
Yes, yes, I know, I know, I have resuscitated an 8-year-old thread! shocked grin

Recently in looking through this online directory of icons, I came across this icon:

It certainly seems to match Fr. Mowatt's description of the icon that served as the basis for the Fatimskaya.

Video.

Description of the icon.

The icon is also painted on the sanctuary wall of the church. :


Interesting. smile

I haven't seen any similar to the one which was in our garden shrine in the old location, and now is in the hall near our agape room.

The one fashioned as in your description here, is now in a small room used for spiritual direction and reconciliation. I have an 8.5" X 11" print of it which is from the old Russian program at Fordham. The text on the back is in Russian. I'll scan the text and post it in the photos section.

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Originally Posted by likethethief
I have an 8.5" X 11" print of it which is from the old Russian program at Fordham. The text on the back is in Russian. I'll scan the text and post it in the photos section.

I look forward to seeing it. Any possibility of having an English translation along with it?

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I would be curious to know if anyone has the high res image of the original icon which Filipe posted which began this thread.

Thanks!

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Just discovered this spectacular icon of Our Lady of Fátima: http://www.kathpedia.com/images/b/b0/Mulier_amicta_sole.jpg



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Oh my God - Greigo Amigo, you deserve an award or something for this find!!

Thank you!!

Alex

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Originally Posted by Amadeus
Dear Filipe:

Can you give us a brief sketch on the origins of the Icon of Our Lady of Fatima?

Was the writer an Eastern or Western iconographer?

Thanks.

Amado

Fourteen years ago, I wrote the following:

Quote
As to the origins of the Fatimskaya icon, here is what I have collected from personal research:

"The titilar eikon of the center, Our Lady of Fatima, is a contemporary work, executed in Paris according to the classic canons of Russian eikon painting, that is to say, applying egg tempura to a carefully prepared wood surface. Our Lady appearing to the three children in the elongated hieratic form associated with high Russian iconographic art." - "The Russian Catholic Center in San Francisco, California", Eastern Churches Quarterly

So, according to the article, the icon was written in Paris according to the traditional manner.

Here is more info about the icon from the booklet, Welcome to the Byzantine-Russian Catholic Chapel in Fatima, written by the late Mitred Archimandrite John Mowatt, former rector of the Byzantine Chapel at Fatima:

"This particualr icon is of an ancient Russian source and in copying the icon the artist just added the figures of the three Seers, Lucia, Francisco, and Jacinta. It is interesting to note here that the Russian Church already had an icon of the Most Holy Virgin Mary, clothed in white, and appearing on top of a tree as she radiated and drew the peoples of the world towards her. This is more than just a mere coincidence as, generally speaking, most Russian and other Byzantine icons of Our Lady always portray her as holding the Divine Child."

Now, fourteen years later, I finally discovered that it was George Morozoff of Paris, who painted the icon in 1950.

Quote
Этот образ Богоматери написан русским иконописцем Георгием Морозовым в 1950 г. Фатимские пастушки изображены в нижнем левом углу, а в правом – люди, с удивлением наблюдающие «пляску солнца».
Над ними – паломники, испрашивающие заступничества Пречистой Девы.
Source.

He is the same iconographer who painted the magnificent iconostasis of the Byzantine Chapel of the Dormition in Fátima.

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I have been trying to find this icon. It was written by the Russian exiles in Europe approximately 1950- 1953. The icon was a gift to the Blue Army of Our Lady of Fatima, USA. It was to be in the Byzantine Chapel in Domis Pacis in Fatima, Portugal.
Domis Pacis was finished around 1956. The icon was never placed in the Byzantine Chapel. My research has shown the icon to be in the Russian Studies Department in Fordham Univeristy.
If you can help I would appreciate it very much.
my email is: ihm51@neo.rr.com

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Welcome to the forum, forrest!

I don't know that a Russian Studies Department still exists at Fordham. I just looked at the University's website and I see that there are Russian language courses offered and at least a few theology department courses in Orthodoxy, but that looks to be all that remains. I believe that most of Fordham's Russian Studies were transferred to the University of Scranton, whether that included religious objects like icons, I don't know. you might inquire of either of the two universities.

Father Economos Romanos Russo, formerly rector of St Michael's Russian Greek-Catholic Church in NYC may know a bit more about it. Father is a member here; I'll message him and and ask him to look at the thread and see if he can offer any info in response to your question.

Many years,

Neil


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Answered elsewhere.
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Originally Posted by forrest
I have been trying to find this icon. It was written by the Russian exiles in Europe approximately 1950- 1953.
The Fatimskaya was written by George Morozoff of Paris in 1950. Please my previous post for more info.

Quote
The icon was a gift to the Blue Army of Our Lady of Fatima, USA.
It was to be in the Byzantine Chapel in Domis Pacis in Fatima, Portugal.
Domis Pacis was finished around 1956. The icon was never placed in the Byzantine Chapel.
The icon was placed in the Byzantine Chapel of the Dormition.
I've attached a b&w photo of the founder of the Blue Army, Msgr. Harold V. Colgan, holding an icon of Our Lady of Fatima. It may be the original that was painted in 1950.

In the booklet, Welcome to the Byzantine-Russian Catholic Chapel in Fatima, written by the late Mitred Archimandrite John Mowatt, former rector of the Byzantine Chapel at Fatima, the Fatimskaya was placed in a shrine to the right of the sanctuary steps of the chapel.

If you go to the original post of this thread, you will read how Filipe YTOL went to the chapel and took photos of the icon and made a jpg image: http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v653/pipos/blogsantiago.jpg

Quote
My research has shown the icon to be in the Russian Studies Department in Fordham Univeristy.
I am interested in learning more about your research.

I did find the following article that may interest you:

Quote
The Pilgrim Virgin Icon of Our Lady of Fatima is the first icon commissioned by the World Apostolate of Fatima’s Byzantine Division to represent the message of Fatima to the East. It is a unique icon inspired by a 1950’s print of Our Lady of Fatima from Fordham University’s Russian Studies Department. The icon itself removes the imagery of the children and the large populations surrounding Our Lady in the previous image and instead focuses primarily on Our Lady. This is the same emphasis taken from the inspired image at Our Lady of Fatima Russian Catholic Church in San Francisco. Source.

The icon at Fordham was a print.

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B&W Fatima Icon.jpg
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Father Economos Romanos Russo tells me that the icon used to be in the chapel of Soloviev Hall (at the John XXIII Center for Eastern Christian Studies at Fordham.) He says that it was afterwards transferred to "Saint Joseph's University, Scranton" - there is one issue here. St Joseph's, a Jesuit University, is in Philadelphia. I think Father Economos meant to reference the University of Scranton, which is also a Jesuit University and the place to which I understood the Eastern Studies to have been relocated. Father did indicate that he was unsure whether it was moved elsewhere thereafter. Hope that info, and the info griego supplied above, are of some assistance to you.

Many years,

Neil


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Originally Posted by forrest
I have been trying to find this icon. It was written by the Russian exiles in Europe approximately 1950- 1953. The icon was a gift to the Blue Army of Our Lady of Fatima, USA. It was to be in the Byzantine Chapel in Domis Pacis in Fatima, Portugal.
Domis Pacis was finished around 1956. The icon was never placed in the Byzantine Chapel. My research has shown the icon to be in the Russian Studies Department in Fordham Univeristy.
If you can help I would appreciate it very much.
my email is: ihm51@neo.rr.com

forrest,

Click the following image link: [img]https://scontent-lax3-2.xx.fbcdn.ne...da81c26f00f9de6d059ba8ea&oe=6141F5F7[/img]

It leads to a photo taken in 2016 of the Mother of God of Kazan shrine located within the Byzantine Chapel. You will see on the right-hand side the icon of Our Lady of Fátima.
It appears to be the same icon that Msgr. Harold V. Colgan, founder of the Blue Army, is shown holding in the photo I posted in my previous post. The frames look alike.

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Originally Posted by forrest
I have been trying to find this icon. It was written by the Russian exiles in Europe approximately 1950- 1953. The icon was a gift to the Blue Army of Our Lady of Fatima, USA. It was to be in the Byzantine Chapel in Domis Pacis in Fatima, Portugal.
Domis Pacis was finished around 1956. The icon was never placed in the Byzantine Chapel. My research has shown the icon to be in the Russian Studies Department in Fordham Univeristy.
If you can help I would appreciate it very much.
my email is: ihm51@neo.rr.com

forrest.

Attached is the Fátima icon on the cover of the May-June 1985 issue of SOUL Magazine, the official magazine of the World Apostolate of Fatima, USA.
On the inside cover, it states:

Quote
The beautiful icon of Our Lady of Fatima in the Byzantine or "Russian" style shows all the people of the world gathered around Our Lady. Of interest are the prostrate figures of the Muslims and the three children of Fatima (in the lower left corner). The lettering alongside the images of both Our Lord and Our Lady is found on all icons where the Savior and His Mother are shown together. The original icon is in the Byzantine Chapel of our International Center in Fatima.

The icon is there at the Byzantine Catholic Chapel of the Dormition in Domus Pacis, the international headquarters of the World Apostolate of Fatima.

The icon was written/painted in 1950 by George Morozoff of Paris, who also wrote/painted the icons of the iconostasis for the chapel.

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SOULmag.jpg (249.21 KB, 40 downloads)
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