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Does anyone here have pictures of the Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament in an Eastern Catholic context?
It is done only within the context of the Divine Liturgy, not outside it, in most Byzantine traditions.

"Byzantine Daily Worship" by Raya and De Vinck has a liturgy written for it and it is in no way, the same as the Adoration in the Latin Rite.
It would not look any different than the blessing with the Holy Gifts after Communion, except the Chalice may have a crowned lid, rather than a veil.
What a distressing thought!

Fr. Serge
Up at Carpathian Village some years ago, a final liturgy was held at the end of one of the children's camps, and lacking a sufficient number of cantors, I was drafted to help. The service books were antique, and at the back of it was the Rite of Benediction, which was very strange to see. It had the text, but no picture. The Melkite Eparchy of Newton used to have a set of before-and-after pictures of one of their churches, showing what it was like before the liturgical reforms of Bishop Joseph Tawil. There is a monstrance very prominent on the altar, but from the angle, I could not see if anything was in it, or how it would work. What did they do, put a Lamb inside of it?
Originally Posted by Collin Nunis
"Byzantine Daily Worship" by Raya and De Vinck has a liturgy written for it and it is in no way, the same as the Adoration in the Latin Rite.


Yes, I'm referring to pictures of the Melkite rite of Benediction as found in the Byzantine Daily Worship book.

I also heard that there are still Corpus Christi ceremonies in Lebanon among the Melkites and among some Ukrainians. Is that true? I once asked that question in a thread that I could no longer find blush
I don't know... but it does happen in some parishes. These are not endorsed by the Eparchy officially or anything but it does happen. I'm not surprised that it does though.
There is a service of Adoration and Benediction in the Maronite Church, but I do not know the details.
Quote
I also heard that there are still Corpus Christi ceremonies in Lebanon among the Melkites and among some Ukrainians. Is that true? I once asked that question in a thread that I could no longer find


Our Eparchial bishop sent out a reminder this year that Corpus Christi and associated borrowings from the Latins ("Suplikatsia", etc.) are completely suppressed within our UGCC Eparchy.

The text for "Suplikatsia" as has been mentioned can be found in BDW and also in older (60s or earlier) Ukrainian or Ruthenian prayer books. The schismatic Society of St. Josaphat are the only ones who continue to practice this latinization in Ukraine regularly to my knowledge. "Christ the Lover of Mankind" still shows up on some Greek Catholic wall calendars but I have not seen a specific reference to "Corpus Christi" as a Greek Catholic observance for many years.
StuartK: yes, a nice, big, healthy, leavened, and consecrated square Lamb!
The Melkite Church absorbed the feast into its calendar in the 18th Century, when it became popular. France had gained the right for a public procession on this feast, and this was an important sign of Christian solidarity under Muslim (Ottoman) oppression. Our Patriarch Maximos wrote some beautiful kathismata, etc., for the feast; the canon of the Metalipsi was used, etc. It was then celebrated as a Class 1 feast of the Lord.

The Holy Synod tried a while ago to expunge it as all Latinisations were being removed. Popular sentiment stopped this from completing. It is now celebrated as a Class 4 feast (i.e., minor feast)--where it is celebrated at all--and slated for eventual removal.

"Corpus Christi" or whatever euphemism one might care to use instead seems to be vanishing rapidly from Ukrainian Greek-Catholic use. I've never encountered it.

Fr. Serge
It might be of interest to note that the Festival of Corpus Christi while never really embraced by Lutheranism, was never explicitly condemned in the Lutheran confessional writings. This may be in part because the Festival had not yet gained universal acceptance in the early 16th century.

Martin Luther adapted a Corpus Christi processional hymn for use in his German Mass as a canticle following Communion:

"O Lord, We Praise Thee"
by Martin Luther, 1483-1546

1. O Lord, we praise Thee, bless Thee, and adore Thee,
In thanksgiving bow before Thee.
Thou with Thy body and Thy blood didst nourish
Our weak souls that they may flouish:
O Lord, have mercy!
May Thy body, Lord, born of Mary,
That our sins and sorrows did carry,
And Thy blood for us plead
In all trial, fear, and need:
O Lord, have mercy!

2. Thy holy body into death was given,
Life to win for us in heaven.
No greater love than this to Thee could bind us;
May this feast thereof remind us!
O Lord, have mercy!
Lord, Thy kindness did so constrain Thee
That Thy blood should bless and sustain me.
All our debt Thou hast paid;
Peace with God once more is made:
O Lord, have mercy.

3. May God bestow on us His grace and favor
To please Him with our behavior
And live as brethren here in love and union
Nor repent this blest Communion!
O Lord, have mercy!
Let not Thy good Spirit forsake us;
Grant that heavenly-minded He make us;
Give Thy Church, Lord, to see
Days of peace and unity:
O Lord, have mercy.
Originally Posted by Erie Byz
There is a service of Adoration and Benediction in the Maronite Church, but I do not know the details.


The priest at our local Maronite parish is trying to move towards perpetual adoration. He's starting with a few hours a week, but is *very* active in recruiting Catholics of any rite for this. (And for his choir. I told him that I was doing his choir a major favor by not joining smile

hawk
It apparently is still used in at least one parish of the BCCA Eparchy of Parma: http://www.stjoebyz.com/bulletin.php?id=102 The service schedule includes a "Supplication to the Blessed Sacrament" from just a couple of months ago.

Somehow I am disinclined to think that a Moleben to the Sacred Heart incorporating Benediction would spiritually fortify me. But lest I sound unkind, here is a contribution:

Genitori, Genitoque,
Laus et Iubilatio!
Salus, honor, virtus quoque
Sit et benedictio!
Et ab Patre Procedenti
Compar sit laudatio!

Amen

Fr. Serge
In the prayerbook "Hear Me, O Lord", compiled by the Rev. Demetrius E. Wysochansky, OSBM and published in 2001 under the imprimatur of Michael Wiwchar, CSsR (the former bishop of the Eparchy of St. Nicholas in Chicago) one can find a text for a ceremony called "Supplication" on page 657 - as well as texts for the Stations of the Cross and the Dominican rosary.

I humbly submit this ain't quite kosher, the imprimatur notwithstanding.

I know Father Demetrius Wysochansky quite well, and I hold him in the highest regard.
To the Good Members of the Byzantine Forum:

I know that the Contemplative Sisters of Saint Basil the Great who are of the Ukrainian Byzantine Catholic Rite in Middletown,, New York have Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament as part of the spiritual lives at their Monastery. So prayers in honor of the Blessed Sacrament should not be something strange or unknown to Byzantine Rite Catholics.

May Jesus the Lover of Mankind Bless All

John Doucette
Originally Posted by John Doucette
To the Good Members of the Byzantine Forum:

I know that the Contemplative Sisters of Saint Basil the Great who are of the Ukrainian Byzantine Catholic Rite in Middletown,, New York have Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament as part of the spiritual lives at their Monastery. So prayers in honor of the Blessed Sacrament should not be something strange or unknown to Byzantine Rite Catholics.

May Jesus the Lover of Mankind Bless All

John Doucette


That is fine and good but it is still a Latinization <SP?>and we have been instructed to be done with them.

In Christ:
Einar
And a recent one at that. One can find prayer books from Ukraine in even the late 1800s prior to the Synod of L'viv that do not include even a mention of "Supplikatisa".

Article 7 of the Union of Brest states
Quote
7.—That we should not be compelled to take part in processions on the day of Corpus Christi—that we should not have to make such processions with our Mysteries inasmuch as our use of the Mysteries is different.
While this article specifically refers to Corpus Christi, the last statement "inasmuch as our use of the Mysteries is different" most definitely applies here by extension. We can take this to mean that similar neolatinizations involving non-traditional usage of the Mysteries should also be treated in the same way (and indeed the hierarchs and the Synod take that opinion).

Praying before the Holy Altar in silence is certainly a praiseworthy thing as the Sisters do. Making it a liturgical thing out of concordance with the authentic received tradition is something entirely different.

In accordance with Article 7 of the Union of Brest (as well as the Instruction, the directions of our Synod, the last Council of the Church, etc.) we of the UGCC should not be making use of this sort of liturgical neo-latinization that most certainly is not a traditional part of the Kyivan liturgical corpus outside of the Divine Liturgy or the giving of Holy Communion outside of the Liturgy.

I have in my hands as I write this (I wanted to check first-hand) the first Ukrainian Greek Catholic prayerbook specifically written in L'viv for the new Eparchy in the US by Fr. Lev Sembratovich and carrying the imprimatur of +Soter of Philadelphia of blessed memory in 1908.

It does not call it "Benediction" or "Supplikatsia" but simply "Prayers before the Holy Gifts", makes no mention of rubrics for a monastrance or elevation of a chalice or anything. Instead these prayers are included basically as a small appendix appearing after such occasional offices as the Paraklesis/Moleben to the Mother of God (which by the way in this book includes the full Canon of Supplication), Akathists to the Savior, the Mother of God, and St. Nicholas.

As a more general side note, I and many others here prefer to be referred to as a "Ukrainian Greek Catholic" or "Ukrainian Catholic" rather than a "Ukrainian Byzantine Catholic Rite" or "Byzantine Rite Catholic". We are a particular Church and not a "Rite".
Originally Posted by Matta
The Holy Synod tried a while ago to expunge it as all Latinisations were being removed. Popular sentiment stopped this from completing. It is now celebrated as a Class 4 feast (i.e., minor feast)--where it is celebrated at all--and slated for eventual removal.

Hopefully the Holy Synod will revisit the issue in the future.
As one very wise Studite hieromonk related to me when we were discussing this phenomena amongst Eastern Catholics - the Mysteries are our Supersubstantial Food, meant to be eaten as our Lord commands for communion unto Him and for life everlasting, and not to simply be gazed upon.
Originally Posted by Diak
As one very wise Studite hieromonk related to me when we were discussing this phenomena amongst Eastern Catholics - the Mysteries are our Supersubstantial Food, meant to be eaten as our Lord commands for communion unto Him and for life everlasting, and not to simply be gazed upon.


Curiously, that is almost the very language of the Thirty-Nine Articles of religion of the Anglican church says that the Sacrament was not intended "to be carried about".
Originally Posted by Thomas the Seeker
Originally Posted by Diak
As one very wise Studite hieromonk related to me when we were discussing this phenomena amongst Eastern Catholics - the Mysteries are our Supersubstantial Food, meant to be eaten as our Lord commands for communion unto Him and for life everlasting, and not to simply be gazed upon.


Curiously, that is almost the very language of the Thirty-Nine Articles of religion of the Anglican church says that the Sacrament was not intended "to be carried about".

Well, you have to carry the Eucharistic elements around a little bit, that is, if you are going to distribute it to the faithful at communion time.
If one is to bring Holy Communion to the sick in their homes, one obviously must carry it - the Holy Gifts are unlikely to go from the church to the sick-bed under their own power, at least not on a regular basis.

And yes, I do realize that the Second Prayer Book of Edward VI prescribes celebrating the "Holy Communion" at the sickbed, presumably to avoid "carrying the Holy Gifts about". But most Anglican priests I know prefer to reserve the Holy Gifts and carry the Gifts to the sick. Some recent editions of the Prayer Book take this into account.

I've also been present in Oxford for Anglican celebrations of Corpus Christi - I'll spare you a full description!

Fr. Serge


Originally Posted by Serge Keleher
Somehow I am disinclined to think that a Moleben to the Sacred Heart incorporating Benediction would spiritually fortify me. But lest I sound unkind, here is a contribution:

Genitori, Genitoque,
Laus et Iubilatio!
Salus, honor, virtus quoque
Sit et benedictio!
Et ab Patre Procedenti
Compar sit laudatio!

Amen

Fr. Serge

Very nice!

It's the right number of syllables, but it doesn't rhyme as well as "procedenti ab utroque" wink
Now, now. Orthodoxy before poetry!

Fr. Serge
Originally Posted by Thomas the Seeker
Originally Posted by Diak
As one very wise Studite hieromonk related to me when we were discussing this phenomena amongst Eastern Catholics - the Mysteries are our Supersubstantial Food, meant to be eaten as our Lord commands for communion unto Him and for life everlasting, and not to simply be gazed upon.


Curiously, that is almost the very language of the Thirty-Nine Articles of religion of the Anglican church says that the Sacrament was not intended "to be carried about".


The Catholic West has certainly extended worship of the Eucharist beyond the Mass itself, but the centrality of the Mass is and has always been kept, which is not the case with those who presume to pronounce about intent.

Though the context is within the Liturgy itself, the "Sacrament" is carried about in a solemn ritual in the Liturgy of the Presanctified; and every Divine Liturgy has a "benediction" (blessing) with the "Sacrament" after Communion at "Save Your people, O God, and bless Your inheritance."

The Studite hieromonk is correct -- "meant to be eaten" -- something especially those who do not gaze as in the West (where frequent communion is now normative) should practice and exemplify as they preach.
Originally Posted by Fr Serge Keleher
If one is to bring Holy Communion to the sick in their homes, one obviously must carry it - the Holy Gifts are unlikely to go from the church to the sick-bed under their own power, at least not on a regular basis.



Aye, and distribution of the previously sanctified has always been my pastoral practice so as to strengthen the connection between the eucharistic community and those whose illness precludes their participation.

St. Paul instructs us that since there is one bread we many as we are form one body; I therefore find it imperative, whenever possible, to commune the absent from the same gifts as were sanctified in the Sunday celebration.
The cope used for Benediction at our Ukrainian Orthodox parish still hangs in the vestment closet. It's not the only one I've seen in an Orthodox church. Sure they're relics of a by gone era. However these liturgical artifacts paint a picture that illustrates that (in the case of the one cope) at least some OCA parishes and Ukrainian Orthodox Parishes in Pennsylvania had at one time celebrated Benediction. Most likely this would have taken place during Lent if I recall correctly.
Easy to explain as well. Most of these parishes simply carried over their liturgical practices at the time they made the transition into Orthodox Christianity from Greek Catholicism. And we can safely assume that the Greek Catholics had received the practice of benediction from the Roman Catholics.
It might be generous to donate the cope to Madonna House for their museum.

Fr. Serge
A cope? Really? Are you sure you're not getting cope (the cape-like vestment) confused with a humeral veil (worn over the shoulders and hands when elevating the monstrance)?

Dave
God change, Father Serge!

Originally Posted by Chtec
A cope? Really? Are you sure you're not getting cope (the cape-like vestment) confused with a humeral veil (worn over the shoulders and hands when elevating the monstrance)?

Dave


haha, thanks for correction Dave. It is indeed a humeral veil.
Fr. Serge,Was ist das.. Madonna house?
Benediction was commonly taken in the Byzantine Church when I was growing up in the 50's and early 60's in Slavonic, then English. I have a book VELIKIJ SBORNIK Preshov 1936. I am not sure how to post a copy of the pages. The service is called Inyj sposob china blahoslovenija Najsv. Evcharistijeju. I am trying to find another book that has a picture, or one of my pictures from Good Friday where the chalice covered with a cloth and a crown on top was in the grave.

For anyone interested, the Madonna house website is:

http://www.madonnahouse.org/
While living in Lviv two yrs ago i definitely encountered many benediction services and on Тіло Христове many processions even by very anti "latinization" priests. At one basilian monastery they even had a monstrqnce exposed on the altar during liturgy. Its definitely not confined to st josephat priests. And in slovakia where I live now, benediction in greek rite churches is very common expecially on first fridays
Is it not strictly forbidden, under current legislation, to offer the Holy Eucharist before the exposed Blessed Sacrament? Just when you thought it was safe to come out of hiding . . . !
Is it not strictly forbidden, under current legislation, to offer the Holy Eucharist before the exposed Blessed Sacrament? Just when you thought it was safe to come out of hiding . . . !
Such extra-liturgical services are indeed common in EC churches in Eastern Europe and throughout the world.

There are today among Ukrainian Catholics and other EC's in Europe much fewer inhibitions about "Latinization."

The people have seen the "Christianity" of a certain powerful, anti-Western Orthodox Church and want to flee anything having to do with it.

One could posit that "Latinization" and Latinized practices have been given a new lease on life as a result of the policies of the "katsap crowd."

I'm going to a Eucharistic Benediction service and I'm looking forward to many more "Latinized" devotions to help "de-Russify" the influence that our "pro-Easterners" have had for obviously too long. They've lost their struggle with the "pro-Westerners" and are on their way out. Good riddance.

Alex
An initial Google search has found that several Melkite parishes in the USA celebrated the Feast of the Divine Body this year (2015) along with Exposition and Benediction of the Most Holy Eucharist. Here is a sampling:

1) Melkite typicon for the month of June that shows the Feast of the Divine Body listed:

Quote
Thursday, June 4, 2015
Feast of the Divine Body

Orthros Gospel John 6:55-59 - Page 27 (English) – Page 33 (Arabic)
Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom
Antiphon Prayer (PLC p. 512)
O Christ God, who gave us your Flesh as true food and your Blood as true drink for our salvation,
sanctify us, enlighten us, make us your temples as we partake of your holy mysteries, so that we may
keep You in our hearts.
For You are our food and our life, O Christ God, and to You we render glory and to your Eternal
Father and your All-holy, Good and Life-giving Spirit, now and always and forever and ever.
Antiphons of the Divine Body, (BDW p. 912), (PLC p. 512), (ED p. 882)
Entrance Hymn “Extol the Lord our God and worship at his footstool for He is Holy. O Son of God,
Heavenly Bread, save us who sing to You: Alleluia!” (BDW p. 914), (PLC p. 514), (ED p. 883)
Hymns Troparion of the Divine Body, (Three times) (BDW p.909), (PLC p. 514), (ED p. 874)
Kondakion of the Divine Body, (BDW p. 909), (PLC p. 515), (ED p. 874)
Epistle 1 Cor 11:23-32, Page 94 (English) – Page 110 (Arabic)
Gospel John 6: 48-55, Page 25 (English) – Page 33 (Arabic)
Hymn to the Theotokos Hirmos of the 9th Ode, (BDW p. 914), (PLC p. 516), (ED p. 885)
Kinonikon of the Divine Body, (BDW p. 914), (PLC p. 516), (ED p. 885)
Post-communion hymn Troparion of the Divine Body, (BDW p.912), (PLC p. 514), (ED p. 874)
Apolysis “May Christ our true God who gave us His Body and Blood as real food and drink for our
salvation…”, (BDW p.914), (PLC p. 516), (ED p. 885)
The Leave-taking of the Feast of the Divine Body is on Thursday, June 11, 2015


2) Photo of the Eucharist exposed in a monstrance in front of the iconostasis at a Melkite parish

3) Close up photo.

4) A parish Facebook announcement of Divine Liturgy and Benediction.

5) Melkite parish bulletin announcement
God bless our Melkite brothers and sisters!

Their Synod itself voted to receive this Feast and I believe they have done an excellent job of placing it within an "organically Byzantine" liturgical context.

Alex
Originally Posted by Fr. Deacon Lance
It would not look any different than the blessing with the Holy Gifts after Communion, except the Chalice may have a crowned lid, rather than a veil.


Here's an example: photo.
It's amusing that the Melkite Feast of the Divine Body retains its ranking with an octave, when the octave was abolished in the Latin Rite by Pope Pius XII in 1955.
Dear Sir,

I'm sure that Traditionalist Roman Catholics aren't so amused!

Alex
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