The Byzantine Forum
Newest Members
Lizzy VH, thomisticgamer, DesertPrayer, Makumazahn, EvaAve
5,706 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
2 members (theophan, 1 invisible), 91 guests, and 33 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Latest Photos
Church of St Cyril of Turau & All Patron Saints of Belarus
Byzantine Nebraska
Byzantine Nebraska
by orthodoxsinner2, December 11
Church of the Holy Trinity (UGCC) - Brazil
Church of the Holy Trinity (UGCC) - Brazil
by Santiago Tarsicio, March 17
Papal Audience 10 November 2017
Papal Audience 10 November 2017
by JLF, November 10
Upgraded Russian icon corner
Upgraded Russian icon corner
by The young fogey, October 20
Forum Statistics
Forums26
Topics34,957
Posts413,413
Members5,706
Most Online3,380
Dec 29th, 2019
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 104
J
Member
OP Offline
Member
J
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 104
Quote
[Episcopal News Service] The International Commission for Anglican–Orthodox Theological Dialogue has released "The Church of the Triune God," an ecclesiological statement registering considerable agreement over a wide range of issues on the nature and mission of the Church.

The introduction to this 117-page document states that "the publication of this Cyprus Agreed Statement concludes the third phase of the Anglican–Orthodox international theological dialogue. It began in 1973...[and] the first phase of the dialogue was concluded by the publication of the Moscow Agreed Statement in 1976. The publication of the Dublin Agreed Statement in 1984 brought its second phase to a conclusion."

Episcopal Bishop Mark Dyer and Greek Orthodox Metropolitan John (Zizioulas) of Pergamon have been co-chairs of Commission and write in their preface that this statement "is offered to the Anglican and Orthodox churches in the hope that, as it is studied and reflected upon, it will help Christians of both traditions to perceive anew the work of the Triune God in giving life to His Church, and draw us closer to that unity which is His will for all the faithful."

Sections of the book are titled The Trinity and the Church; Christ, the Spirit and the Church; Christ, Humanity and the Church; Episcope, Episcopos and Primacy, Priesthood, Christ and the Church; Women and Men, Ministries and the Church; Heresy, Schism and the Church; and Reception in Communion.

Bishop Christopher Epting, deputy for ecumenical relations for the Episcopal Church, said: "I believe many will be surprised at the level of agreement reached over the years between our two families of churches. There is much to reflect upon in this little book which will be helpful to us, not only ecumenically, but within our own Anglican Communion in these days."

The statement will be offered for consideration at the 2008 Lambeth Conference of Anglican Communion bishops.



http://www.episcopal-life.org/79901_86292_ENG_HTM.htm



Hmm, I'm not sure what to make of this given the party involved on the "Anglican" side.

Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,712
T
Member
Offline
Member
T
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,712
Much sound and fury, signifying nothing...

... well, to be fair all it means is on paper the Episcopal Church is still a Christian church, which of course is fine.

Yes, the Nicene, Apostles' and Athanasian creeds are in the American Prayer Book. But since James Pike as Bishop of California was allowed not to believe in them (he repudiated the Trinity) 41 years ago does that really mean anything?

As for corporate reunion as envisaged by St Tikhon, the Catholic Movement in Anglicanism is on the ropes.

I fear it's like ARCIC: both sides' liberals getting together and agreeing with each other. But there's nothing really to fear from the Orthodox on this as their 'liberals' are soundly conservative by Western standards.

Still, I wonder 'What's the point?'

Better to do what then-Cardinal Ratzinger did: bypass the national Episcopal authorities and talk directly to the conservative dioceses (in that case the American Anglican Council).

Like the Russian Orthodox Church, which broke off relations with 'the national church' in 2003 after the latter made a statement by approving and consecrating an unrepentant homosexual bishop.

It still talks to the conservative dioceses that opposed that.

Even though all except the three Anglo-Catholic dioceses ordain women. The improbabilist position on that is acceptable as is the impossibilist one.

Why not some joint charitable work with these groups or some innocuous stuff like Vacation Bible School, like local Anglican-Orthodox cooperation in the old days? Back then immigrants would send their kids to Episcopal Sunday school. Many/most Anglicans didn't try and convert them. They'd lend their churches for Orthodox services.

Though most of these people wouldn't become Orthodox tomorrow - many have evangelical Protestant leanings - dialogue with them wouldn't be a waste of time unlike these empty ecumenical gestures and pious rhetoric.

Similarly most of the conservative 'Global South' majority in the Anglican Communion is of the Protestant persuasion and would oppose Orthodoxy for lots of anti-Catholic reasons (even though there's no Pope).

But the Orthodox trying to witness to these Christian brothers to teach them and disabuse them of those notions wouldn't be a waste.

Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,532
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,532
The recent actions of the Anglican Church just prove how far from Christianity they have fallen. To call some of them Christian is generous.


Last edited by Ray S.; 05/26/07 02:56 PM.
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 10,943
Moderator
Member
Offline
Moderator
Member
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 10,943
Originally Posted by Ray S.
The recent actions of the Anglican Church just prove how far from Christianity they have fallen. To call some of them Christian is generous.



Dear Ray,

In the words of Bishop Kallistos Ware, let's remember that there are, indeed, orthodox believers within the Anglican communion, and we must not condemn them, rather we must pray for them.

Infact, I met one such lady from the South at last week's coffee hour. She was visiting her son and daughter-in-law, and her daughter-in-law is the niece of an Orthodox bishop of blessed memory.

This woman is very active in her church's ecumenical outreach. She was very fond of the initiatives of the late Archbishop Iakovos. She laments the changes to her church and in her own words, she knows that they are setting unity back, rather than closer together.

We had a very nice, ecumenical and respectful conversation. She obviously has no intent to leave her beloved church, and in doing so, I believe that she is brave. It is far braver for the faithful to stay where they are scandalized or hurt than to leave. They are fighters and they ARE good Christians, and they deserve our prayers and not our judgement.

In Christ,
Alice


Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,398
J
Member
Offline
Member
J
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,398
Alice,

Yes indeed, well said. One thing that people have to realize is that, especially on the east coast of the United States, there are many people who see themselves as descended from several generations of family in their Church (whether Anglican, Methodist, Baptist, etc.). And so, by leaving Anglicanism, they would be abandoning their heritage. With such strong ties to traditions, it is difficult to leave. Some feel that they must be loyal and stay with it through thick and thin. I think that this is especially the case with southern Anglicanism.

Joe

Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,712
T
Member
Offline
Member
T
Joined: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,712
What Alice and Joe said.

Joined: Oct 2002
Posts: 4,225
Member
Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2002
Posts: 4,225
Amen my Orthodox sister...


" It is far braver for the faithful to stay where they are scandalized or hurt than to leave. They are fighters and they ARE good Christians, and they deserve our prayers and not our judgement."

For to leave would mean surrender to...

james

Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 10,943
Moderator
Member
Offline
Moderator
Member
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 10,943
Originally Posted by JSMelkiteOrthodoxy
Alice,

Yes indeed, well said. One thing that people have to realize is that, especially on the east coast of the United States, there are many people who see themselves as descended from several generations of family in their Church (whether Anglican, Methodist, Baptist, etc.). And so, by leaving Anglicanism, they would be abandoning their heritage. With such strong ties to traditions, it is difficult to leave. Some feel that they must be loyal and stay with it through thick and thin. I think that this is especially the case with southern Anglicanism.

Joe


This is very true. The Episcopal/Anglican church has been a church of social, family and cultural identity for generations of American families...and in a way, this is not all that different from the way the various Orthodox and Byzantine Catholic people feel about their churches.

In Christ,
Alice



Moderated by  Father Anthony 

Link Copied to Clipboard
The Byzantine Forum provides message boards for discussions focusing on Eastern Christianity (though discussions of other topics are welcome). The views expressed herein are those of the participants and may or may not reflect the teachings of the Byzantine Catholic or any other Church. The Byzantine Forum and the www.byzcath.org site exist to help build up the Church but are unofficial, have no connection with any Church entity, and should not be looked to as a source for official information for any Church. All posts become property of byzcath.org. Contents copyright - 1996-2020 (Forum 1998-2020). All rights reserved.
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5