ISTANBUL Turkey -- Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew paid a reciprocal visit to the Roman Catholic Cathedral of the Holy Spirit in Istanbul today where he was welcomed by Pope Benedict XVI.
 
The two leaders joined in a procession into the Cathedral of the Holy Spirit where the Pope celebrated the Liturgy for the Roman Catholic community of Istanbul. During the Liturgy the Pope and the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew exchanged a kiss of peace and offered a common blessing to the faithful.
 
Also in attendance for the Roman Catholic Liturgy were the heads of the other Christian Communities of the city.
 
The Roman Catholic Cathedral of the Holy Spirit, built in 1846 under the direction of Italian architect Julien Hillereau, is located near the Beyoglu District of Istanbul. The statute of one of the Pope's predecessors with the same name, Benedict XV, stands in the courtyard of the cathedral.

(Note:  For more information, please log on to www.patriarchate.org)

Friday, December 1, 2006


Teachings of Christ

“Whoever denies me before men, I also will deny before my Father who is in heaven.” (Matthew 10:33 ESV)

Exaltation of the Cross

Save Your people, O Lord, and bless Your inheritance; * grant victory to Your Church over her enemies * and protect Your commonwealth by Your Cross. (Troparion - Tone 1)

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, now and ever, and to the ages of ages. Amen.

Willingly lifted up on the Cross, O Christ God, * bestow Your compassions upon the new commonwealth that bears Your name. * By your power grant joy to Your Church, * granting her victory over her enemies. * May she have your Cross as the weapon of peace * and the invincible ensign of victory. (Kontakion - Tone 4)

The Church celebrates the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross on September 14th.

Random Proverb

"The woman Folly is loud; she is seductive and knows nothing." (Proverbs 9:13 ESV)

Pray Without Ceasing

Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.

Wisdom from the Church Fathers

A greedy appetite for food is terminated by satiety and the pleasure of drinking ends when our thirst is quenched. And so it is with the other things. . . But the possession of virtue, once it is solidly achieved, cannot be measured by time nor limited by satiety. Rather, to those who are its disciples it always appears as something ever new and fresh.

St. Gregory of Nyssa