CWN - Cardinal Pietro Parolin reviewed his visit to Moscow, and his conversations with Russian President Vladimir Putin and Orthodox Patriarch Kirill, in an interview with Vatican Radio.

The Vatican Secretary of State revealed that he had given a full briefing on the visit to Pope Francis immediately upon his return to Rome. The Pontiff “was pleased with the impressions and positive results” of the trip, he said.

Cardinal Parolin said that in his conversation with Patriarch Kirill, the focus was primarily on cooperation between the Catholic and Orthodox churches. “Slightly thorny issues were also touched,” he said. He mentioned the situation in Ukraine, where Catholic and Orthodox leaders have frequently clashed.

With President Putin, the cardinal said, the conversation centered on the Middle East, and especially the plight of Christians in that region. He said that he also spoke with the Russian leader about Ukraine and about the crisis in Venezuela. Cardinal Parolin discussed the same international issues earlier in talks with Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov.

Overall, the cardinal said, his meetings in Rome “were truly characterized by a cordial, listening, and respectful climate.”



Teachings of Christ

“Blessed are you when others revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account." (Matthew 5:11 ESV)

Lenten Prayer of St. Ephrem

O Lord and Master of my life, drive away from me the spirit of despondency, carelessness, love of power, and idle chatter. (Prostration)

Rather grant to me, Your servant, the spirit of wholeness of being, humility, patience, and love. (Prostration)

Yes, O Lord and King, grant that I may see my own faults and not condemn my brother; for You are blessed to the ages of ages. Amen. (Prostration)

Random Proverb

"The wage of the righteous leads to life, the gain of the wicked to sin." (Proverbs 10:10 ESV)

Pray Without Ceasing

Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.

Wisdom from the Church Fathers

Good and God-loving men accuse people of something bad when they are present, but when they are absent they not only refrain from accusing them, but do not permit others to do so when they attempt to speak of them.

From St. Anthony the Great (170 Texts on Saintly Life no. 30) REF: Fr. Seraphim Rose, "Letters"