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#239910 06/15/07 11:39 AM
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marusia Offline OP
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Could someone explain to me the differnce in terms between Dobrodika and Presbytera. At Sw Pokrowy as children we called the wives of the clergy Pani Dobrodika. However I have noticed that the term Presbytera has been mentioned lately. Someone enlighten me .

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CIX!
Presbytera is the Greek term and is used frequently in churches of Greek origin. In our Ukrainian parishes Pani Dobrodivka or Pani Matka is used for the priest's wife. The Melkites and Antiochians use Khouria, and the Russians Matushka. All are honorifics for the priest's wife.

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Rusyns use the term "Pani".

Dn. Robert

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Originally Posted by Jessup B.C. Deacon
Rusyns use the term "Pani".

Dn. Robert
Which is Ukrainian for Little, and a shortening of Pani Matka, which means Little Mother, or Mama.

Quote
In the case of married clergy, the wife of a Priest or Deacon is also informally addressed with a title. Since the Mystery of Marriage binds a Priest and his wife together as "one flesh," [99] the wife shares in a sense her husband's Priesthood. This does not, of course, mean that she has the very Grace of the Priesthood or its office, but the dignity of her husband's service certainly accrues to her. [100] The various titles used by the national Churches are listed below. The Greek titles, since they have English correspondents, are perhaps the easiest to use in the West:

Greek: Presbytera (Pres�vee�t�ra)
Russian: Matushka (M�toosh�ka)
Serbian: Papadiya (Pa�p�dee�ya)
Ukrainian: Panimatushka (Pa�nee�m�toosh�ka), or Panimatka (Pa�nee�m�t�ka)

The wife of a Deacon is called "Diakonissa [Thee�a�k�nees�sa]" in Greek. The Slavic Churches commonly use the same title for the wife of a Deacon as they do for the wife of a Priest. In any case, the wife of a Priest should normally be addressed with both her title and her name in informal situations (e.g., "Presbytera Mary," "Diakonissa Sophia," etc.).
The above article, when printed in 2005, had Dobrodika in the Ukrainian list. For some reason, it has since been removed.

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In English, Presvytera may be the best choice, since most of our ecclesiastical terminology comes from Greek - thus avoiding confusion and not having the woman addressed in five or six different ways in the course of the same conversation.

By the same token, it would be strange to ask someone to "chant the Bi-Wajib in the Fourth Hang".

Fr. Serge

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Originally Posted by Wondering
Which is Ukrainian for Little, and a shortening of Pani Matka, which means Little Mother, or Mama.

If you look at several Slavic languages (Slovak, Polish, Ukrainian, Rusyn) "Pan" and "Pani" are the polite forms of address for men and married women, respectively--equivalent in today's speech to Mr. and Mrs.

So "Pani Matka" is not "Little Mother"--that is what the Russian "Matushka" means. "Pani Matka" would be more like "Mrs. Mother."

Perhaps we can coin a new term in English: Mrs. Priest or Mrs. Presbyter. wink

Dave

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Dear Dave,

Yes, indeed "Pan" and "Pani" are formerly aristocratic titles that are now used in formal address "Pani" meaning "Lady."

Some Ukrainian Orthodox use "Pani Maty" and Ukrainian Catholics use "Pani DobrOdiyka."

Alex

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Thank you for the correction. I have seen Pani Matka translated and explained as Little Mother in so many places, such as this [theologic.com], that it is nice to have someone who is fluent in the language give a better translation.

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Matka can be deemed to be "Little Mother"


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