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For those of you with ancestry in Slovakia - which village did your ancestors come from? My paternal grandparents came from Beloveza, north of Presov, in 1911. Greek Catholic Rusyns.

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My Baba was born in the Rusyn village of Matovce, Saros County of what was Austria-Hungary in 1892, today Eastern Slovakia. My Dido was born in Ungcsertezs, Ung County, Austria-Hungary in 1885, today Transcarpatian Rus' region of Ukraine.

Ungcsertezs

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Reminds me of a very similiar question people often ask you when you're visiting a parish out of town? Are you Carpatho-Russian, Rusyn, pro nash, and what village are your people from?
Luckily, I am a card-carrying person of slavic genetics. But what if? What if? What would they do to me if I was like, "my people are from French Guyana?" Would they let me in the church or spit in my halupki at the coffee hour?
I am SO glad they taught me the secret handshake when I was about 6-ish (yes, I just did that, I just mentioned the secret handshake).
So when I am visiting out of town, I usually give the secret handshake before the door guards* ask me that question on my way into the church.

*(people that linger around the main doors to talk to people coming into church. may be actual volunteer greeters or just people who like to talk to people on the way into church because they like to do that)

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Originally Posted by Ung-Certez
My Baba was born in the Rusyn village of Matovce, Saros County of what was Austria-Hungary in 1892, today Eastern Slovakia. My Dido was born in Ungcsertezs, Ung County, Austria-Hungary in 1885, today Transcarpatian Rus' region of Ukraine.

Ungcsertezs

See, notice the word "Ukraine."

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My great grandfather came from Jakubany, Spis county. Greek Catholic.

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Originally Posted by Orthodox Pyrohy.
Originally Posted by Ung-Certez
My Baba was born in the Rusyn village of Matovce, Saros County of what was Austria-Hungary in 1892, today Eastern Slovakia. My Dido was born in Ungcsertezs, Ung County, Austria-Hungary in 1885, today Transcarpatian Rus' region of Ukraine.

Ungcsertezs

See, notice the word "Ukraine."

I guess through your logic, since Jews, Roma, Hungarians and Romanians are too from the Transcarpathian Rus' region of Ukraine (non-Slavs), they must ethnically be Ukrainian as well? Isn't that called ethnic engineering?

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My grandmother came from Sterkovce, Zemplin County and my grandfather from N'agov in the same area. Byzantine Catholic.

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Glory to Jesus Christ!
My mother came from Bodrog-Szerhely, as it was called in Hungarian.
The town's Slovak name now is Strada Na Bodrogom.
Hungarian Greek Catholic.
Deacon El

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My maternal grandfather was from Bajerovce. My maternal grandmother was from L'ubotin.

My paternal grandmother was from Rovne. My paternal grandfather was from Hrabovcik, where my father grew up.

All but my maternal grandmother were Rusyn Greek Catholics. My maternal grandmother, Anna Regec, was Slovak Roman Catholic.

--tim

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Originally Posted by Orthodox Pyrohy.
Reminds me of a very similiar question people often ask you when you're visiting a parish out of town? Are you Carpatho-Russian, Rusyn, pro nash, and what village are your people from?
Luckily, I am a card-carrying person of slavic genetics. But what if? What if? What would they do to me if I was like, "my people are from French Guyana?" Would they let me in the church or spit in my halupki at the coffee hour?
I am SO glad they taught me the secret handshake when I was about 6-ish (yes, I just did that, I just mentioned the secret handshake).
So when I am visiting out of town, I usually give the secret handshake before the door guards* ask me that question on my way into the church.

*(people that linger around the main doors to talk to people coming into church. may be actual volunteer greeters or just people who like to talk to people on the way into church because they like to do that)


I wasn't gpign to answer in this thread, but he above did have me curoous. I'm Celtic, and my Ancestory rests in England mainly. I'm British tothe last drop of blood.

So, how woudl that cause them to react?

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Grandpa was from Vojkovce, near Presov, Spis county, Slovakia.
Grandma from Uhryn, Powiat Nowy Sancz, Lemkivshchyna. A proud Ukrainian.

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Zarove said---"I wasn't gpign to answer in this thread, but he above did have me curoous. I'm Celtic, and my Ancestory rests in England mainly. I'm British tothe last drop of blood.

So, how woudl that cause them to react?"

They would welcome you with open arms. People, of all ethnicities, are basically very friendly. It may take time to get to know that side of them, but only the very rude or immature would spurn someone based on a different ethnicity. Especially at a church. Some would throw their arms around you and welcome you warmly, others might nod slightly. Others might not acknowledge you at all. But if you came up and started talking to someone with a smile on your face, they would smile right back.

My paternal grandfather was from Kalsa, now Eastern Slovakia and come to America in 1905. My maternal grandfather was from Cejkov, now far Eastern Slovakia.

Both sides of my family were Greek Catholic for generations. My father's side has been traced back to the late 1700's and it's Greek Catholic all the way back. I suspect my mother's side is the same. But I haven't had time to check that side yet.

Tim

Last edited by tjm199; 11/21/07 04:08 PM. Reason: added quotation to clarify
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My paternal Grandfather and Grandmother both came from the village of Cabiny in the Medzilaborce district of the Presov Region... landed in New York on November 15, 1902. They came to join others of my family who preceeded them in emigrating to America. An elderly (90+ years) cousin of my Dad's still fondly refers to our family as "Carpathian Hillbillies!" biggrin

Earliest members of my family settled in the Shenandoah/Mahanoy City area of Pennsylvania and were among the founding parishioners of the first Ruthenian Greek Catholic parish on American soil, St. Michael the Archangel in Shenandoah, PA (founded in 1886)... guess I could say that my family came over on the "Byzantine Mayflower!" grin In fact, one of my family members is probably the first official "historian" of the Byzantine Catholic Church in America, having written articles for the Amerikansky Russkij Viestnik (American Rusyn Messenger) Greek Catholic Newspaper chronicling details of construction progress on St. Michael's as well as the solemn consecration of the church upon its completion... sure wish I had inherited his writing skills!

Al (a pilgrim)

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My ancestors came from Norway (small town near Bergen, and another side from a small town north of Trondheim), Sweden, and Northern Germany (Prussia when they left I believe).

My mom was raised Roman Catholic and converted to Lutheran when she married my dad. I was raised Lutheran, and am now ByzCath, so I consider myself a descendent of the Varangian Guard (Viking body guards for the Byz Emperor)!

Sorry, I know that wasn't the question, but really wanted to answer!

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Originally Posted by ZAROVE
Originally Posted by Orthodox Pyrohy.
Reminds me of a very similiar question people often ask you when you're visiting a parish out of town? Are you Carpatho-Russian, Rusyn, pro nash, and what village are your people from?
Luckily, I am a card-carrying person of slavic genetics. But what if? What if? What would they do to me if I was like, "my people are from French Guyana?" Would they let me in the church or spit in my halupki at the coffee hour?
I am SO glad they taught me the secret handshake when I was about 6-ish (yes, I just did that, I just mentioned the secret handshake).
So when I am visiting out of town, I usually give the secret handshake before the door guards* ask me that question on my way into the church.

*(people that linger around the main doors to talk to people coming into church. may be actual volunteer greeters or just people who like to talk to people on the way into church because they like to do that)


I wasn't gpign to answer in this thread, but he above did have me curoous. I'm Celtic, and my Ancestory rests in England mainly. I'm British tothe last drop of blood.

So, how woudl that cause them to react?

Hmmmm perplexing.

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