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#308849 01/05/09 10:31 PM
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ajk Offline OP
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The following is a previous post of mine from another thread. That thread was multi-issued and this point was lost in the noise and the bigger issues. Though small in focus, it raises for me an important question about the methodology and intent of the RDL translation. Here is the original post (slightly modified):

_______________________________________________________________

Originally Posted by Father David
At any rate, we do not usually call our priests, "Master," but we call them "Father."
But call them anything you wish.

I've been meaning to point out another apparently unacceptable address for the priest as witnessed by the translation in the the RDL (found also in the Passaic liturgicon). Apparently this change in the status or perception of the priest happened after 1965 for it is still found in that liturgicon; it is also found in the Ruthenian Recension text (Sluzhebnik and Archieratikon), the Vulgata text, the 1950 Greek text; but not in the RDL.

It occurs after the Great Entrance at the end of a dialog between the priest and concelebrant(s) with the deacon alone asking, "Remember me, holy Master." (1965 liturgicon translation).

Like anthropous/chelovik/men in the Creed, this is another example of the amazing disappearing word act in the RDL: hagie/svjatij/holy. Of course "holy Reverend Father" or "holy Most Reverend Bishop" is certainly a bit much. And God forbid that even in this dialog that is usually outside the hearing of the people, the deacon should give expression to the proper stature of the priest, and the priest should be reminded of it, hear and be reminded of his sacred character as priest: not reverend but holy.

Apparently the "ordinary" address of Reverend Father (and really the "reverend" part isn't ordinary) is more important than the "holy" or for some reason addressing the priest as "holy" is just too much to bear. Or embarrassing? Goodness, what would someone hearing the priest addressed as "holy Master" think. Fr. David says "call them anything you wish" and the RDL responds, but not "holy."

Having a common designation -- and in translation "master" certainly does the job -- gets the emphasis of the liturgy right: not Reverend this or Most Reverend that, or Bishop or Presbyter or Metropolitan but THE PRIEST, the HOLY Master who offers and leads the offering of the liturgy wherein the Lord, Who is Holy (Lev. 19:2) and Master (Jud. 1:4; Rev. 6:10), acts.

_______________________________________________________________

My intended focus here is not the translation of Vladyko/Master/Whatever but the word holy. I really would like to know the reasoning of the IELC and the bishops in dropping the word "holy" from the liturgy in this dialog.

Also, Fr, David says glibly "But call them anything you wish." The irony is that, if a deacon were to use the straightforward English that translates the Greek and Slavonic, "Holy Master" I doubt that he would be complimented for the precision of his rendering.


ajk #308921 01/06/09 11:15 PM
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You may address me as "Father Archimandrite" or just "Father Serge", and I shall not be offended in the least. If you address me as "Brian meas O'Ceileachair" (correctly pronounced, please) I shall assume that you are an Irish-speaker who doesn't have any particular involvement with religion. And so on - I'm expecting a UPS shipment in the next few days, and I shall not be surprised or annoyed if the delivery man asks for "Mr. So-and-So".

But I really do not care to be addressed or referred to as "Reverend"! I find that if I politely and calmly make that preference of mine known to someone who has been unwittingly violating it, the offending party apologizes, chooses his preference from among the above options, and all is well.

Honesty compels me to add that in England on the eve of the Reformation a simple priest was called "Mr."; a Pastor was called "Father" and an abbot or bishop was called "Reverend Father". These titles are not written in stone. But at the moment most priests share my own preferences.

Fr. Serge


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