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indigo Offline OP
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Hi All,
I just saw a notice for free Turkish classes, and though I love literature and languages,at this point I'm not too interested in learning non western languages unless I can possibly visit one day and attend Eastern Catholic or Orthodox services. (as long as I'm in school, the government would send me to summer school if I got serious about it.)


I know Turkey's a real tough place for christians, and Christian worship.In what language are services held in Turkey, and is it even possible for a foreign visitor to attend them?

Forgive me if this is in the wrong forum. Moderators, feel free to move it if necessary.

Peace,
Indigo

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The Greek Orthodox Church (EP) celebrates in Greek.

Go here for a list of their churches in Turkey under the EP:
http://www.ec-patr.org/patrdisplay.php?lang=en&id=4

I believe there is also a Bulgarian Orthodox Church in Instanbul celebrating in Church Slavonic.
Don't have the list of Aremnian Orthodox parishes or Syrian Orthodox parishes.


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There are some parishes in Turkey that belong to the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and use Turkish.

I don't know if there are any EP parishes that use Turkish.

Dave

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Like almost anything to do with Christians in Turkey, this is a complicated matter.

The "Turkish Orthodox Church" used to serve in Turkish. But so far as I know, it no longer holds services at all.

There was, about 20 years ago, a small Ecumenical Patriarchate parish on the European side of Constantinople which had services in Turkish. It has been closed.

There are the mentioned parishes of the Patriarchate of Antioch in the south, mostly along the Syrian border, from Antioch ("Antakiya") to the east - but this is not the safest part of Turkey and one is well advised not to go there.

The Armenians serve in Armenian.

The Syrian Orthodox (non-Chalcedonian) and Assyrian Church of East serve in Syriac.

The Greeks serve in Greek - they are to be found in Constantinople and on Imvros and Tenedos and are shrinking fast.

There is a Russian Orthodox Church (Outside of Russia) cleverly tucked into an apartment building in Constantinople. They serve in Slavonic.

And so it goes. If you succeed in finding a Church using a language which suits you, you are probably welcome to attend it.

May God assist you!

Fr. Serge

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indigo Offline OP
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Thanks for your replies. Sounds like maybe I should pass on the Turkish lessons and look for a language in which it would be easier to find Eastern Christian services if I visited the country.

Peace,
Indigo

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Why not go and take Arabic lessons in Damascus? Nice place, lots of Eastern Christian services, nice people, and the language is much more wide-spread than Turkish.

Fr. Serge

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A few summers ago I attended a Chaldean Catholic Raza in Constantinople served by Archbishop Paul in Syriac. The people also sang in Syriac. I was astonished by the fact that the homily was also in Syriac! This took place in the crypt of Saint Anthony of Padua Church on the Istiqlal in the Beyoglu section of the City. The large crypt was full, though the archbishop told me beforehand that during the hottest months of summer a large number of his flock scatters to more hospitable climes. I cherish the week we spent together, especially now after his blessed repose.
During the week I attended a sparsely attended R. C. Mass in the sacristy of the main church In Turkish. A large number of Turks visited the church and were intrigued by the Christian literature on the 'pamphlet' rack

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The remaining Armenians serve in - surprise! - Armenian. The Maronites serve in a combination of Syriac and Arabic. And so it goes.

Turkish is not often used, although there is a Greek-Catholic pamphlet edition of the Divine Liturgy in Turkish. The ephemeral "Turkish Orthodox Church" has produced a few Turkish translations, but does not appear to hold services in any language anywhere.

Fr. Serge


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