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#351586 08/25/10 10:46 PM
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Shlomo Lkhoolkhoon,

As the title says: what do you all think about this?

Fush BaShlomo Lkhooolkhoon,
Yuhannon

Speaking in Tongues at Mass

ROME, AUG. 24, 2010 (Zenit.org).- Answered by Legionary of Christ Father Edward McNamara, professor of liturgy at the Regina Apostolorum university.

Q: What is allowed for regarding the (so-called) "speaking in tongues" during a Charismatic Mass? And what exactly is an acceptable type of such Mass? Recently, I attended a Mass where the priest added his own prayers during the elevation of the Eucharist (having said the formal prayers of consecration) and, with those present (who were, excluding myself, members of the parish charismatic prayer group), prayed in tongues during the Eucharistic Prayer and at other moments of the Mass. There were various other obvious illicit moments during the Mass and perhaps afterward as well (e.g., layperson anointing with some type of oil), but I'm particularly curious about the "tongues." As far as I can deduce, this is not allowed, but it's exceedingly difficult to find anything to the contrary aside from mere opinions. -- P.H., Limerick, Ireland

A: There are practically no universal guidelines on this subject, except of course the general norms that prohibit adding anything whatsoever to officially prescribed texts.

Although some individual bishops have published norms for their dioceses, as far as I know the most complete treatment of this subject is that published by the Brazilian bishops' conference. The document, "Pastoral Orientation Regarding the Catholic Charismatic Renewal," was issued in November 1994. It can be accessed in the Portuguese original at the bishops' Web site: www.cnbb.com.br. [cnbb.com.br.]

It must be noted that the Brazilian bishops have a generally positive view of the Charismatic Renewal, and a significant number participate in charismatic Masses. The renewal is considered as being especially attuned and appealing to a wide swath of Brazilian society and is credited as helping to stem the hemorrhaging of Catholics toward Pentecostal sects.

Therefore, the norms issued by the bishops should be seen as genuine orientations to help the Catholic Charismatic Renewal achieve its full potential as an integral portion of the wider Catholic community. They should not be seen as condemnation of aberrations and abuses.

In dealing with liturgy (Nos. 38-44), the bishops' document recommends that the members of the renewal receive an adequate liturgical formation. It reminds them that the liturgy is governed by precise rules and nothing external should be introduced (No. 40). No. 41 has precise indications:

"In the celebration of Holy Mass the words of the institution must not be stressed in an inadequate fashion. Nor must the Eucharistic Prayer be interrupted by moments of praise for Christ's Eucharistic presence by means of applause, cheers, processions, hymns of Eucharistic praise or any other manifestations that exalt in this way the Real Presence and end up emptying out the various dimensions of the Eucharistic celebration."

In No. 42 the bishops indicate that music and gestures should be appropriate to the moment of the celebration and follow the liturgical norms. A clear distinction should be made between liturgical hymns and other religious songs that are reserved to prayer meetings. Hymns should preferably be chosen from an official repertoire of liturgical songs.

Finally, the bishops say that Charismatic Renewal meetings should not be scheduled to coincide with regular Masses and other gatherings of the whole ecclesial community.

When referring to speaking in tongues (No. 62), the document offers the following clarifications:

"Speaking or praying in tongues: The object or destination of praying in tongues is God himself, being the attitude of a person absorbed in a particular conversation with God. The object or destination of speaking in tongues is the community. The Apostle Paul teaches, 'When I am in the presence of the community I would rather say five words that mean something than ten thousand words in a tongue' (1 Corinthians 14:19). Since in practice it is difficult to distinguish between the inspirations of the Holy Spirit and the instigations of the group leader, there should never be a call encouraging praying in tongues, and speaking in tongues should not take place unless there is also an interpreter."

I think that these wise counsels and norms from the Brazilian bishops show that it is not in conformity with the authentic charism of the Catholic Charismatic renewal to speak in tongues during Mass.

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Although I am employed as a professional translator, the phenomenon of glossolalia has nothing to do with me or my attempts at having a spiritual life.

I am highly sceptical about it originating with God. I suspect it MIGHT be a manifestation of prelest'. Maybe not. Only God knows for sure.

It savors of un-Catholic, Protestant Pentecostalism.

Now, those of you who are more positively inclined toward it, please don't go complaining that I'm attacking you or your sincerity.

Besides, the original question answered by the Legionary of Christ had to do with glossolalia at Latin-rite Masses.


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im pretty sure St. Paul set the guidelines for speaking tongues and necessary interpretation during services...in the Corinthian epistle i think...

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http://www.fatheralexander.org/booklets/english/charismatic_revival_s_rose_e.htm

I think this link says it all for me. The Charismatic Movement doesn't seem to have solid spiritual foundations. For Eastern Christians, there is a solid spiritual tradition that doesn't need this sort of thing.

Actually, there are some threads that have dealt with this topic lately. The Orthodox understanding is that during Apostolic times the speaker spoke in his own intelligible language but was understood by the hearer in his own intelligible language. Never was there any babbling that others could not understand, as there seems to be in this new manifestation. Take a look at the history section of the link I've provided and see how this almost begins with self-hypnosis. Then ask yourself if this could be spiritual danger or not.

In Christ,

Bob

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Shlomo Bob,

Thank you for the link. I agree with what is written. I find that most people who "speak in tongues" are just religious pimps, trying to shakedown the uneducated.

Fush BaShlomo,
Yuhannon

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Originally Posted by theophan
The Orthodox understanding is that during Apostolic times the speaker spoke in his own intelligible language but was understood by the hearer in his own intelligible language. Never was there any babbling that others could not understand, as there seems to be in this new manifestation.

I think that that is *exactly* the issue. At Pentacost, each heard and understood in his own language. At Babylon, noone understood. If one was truly speaking in tongues, everyone would understand. Incomprehensible utterances are, at best, misguided babbling, and at worst, Babyling.

If noone can understand it, it isn't the Spirit Inspiring.


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