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Are the texts of the UGCC available in English, and if so, where?

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You may want to begin with this fine resource: "The Divine Liturgy: An Antholgy for Worship"

It is available here: http://www.sheptytskyinstitute.ca/resources/publications/

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Keep in mind that the English translations of the UGCC are not going to differ that much from English texts used by other Byzantine tradition Catholics or Orthodox.

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Thanks!

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Actually, I remember His Grace, Bishop Emeritus Robert Moskal from the St. Josaphat Eparchy also released his own translation for the UGCC DL in English, too, which is still in use by certain parishes in the Eparchy (although I'm sure the Anthology for Worship probably trumped his book in most parishes).
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The Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom
Published by the Eparchy of Saint Josaphat in Parma in 1999. This light-weight 114 page soft cover book has the resurrectional tones, weekday propers, Panikhida and hymns. Available for $10 plus shipping and handling through the Pastoral Ministry Office.
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http://www.stbasils.com/store.html

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I came across a youtube vid of a DIVINE LITURGY at a conference in Napa Valley. They did the kiss of peace but unlike the Latin Rite it was a kiss on the cheek or shoulder. I have never seen this before. I am a BC of the Ruthenian Rite. How common is this practice?

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This is as it should be done - and it's only done by the clergy .

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Originally Posted by jiompkowski
I came across a youtube vid of a DIVINE LITURGY at a conference in Napa Valley. They did the kiss of peace but unlike the Latin Rite it was a kiss on the cheek or shoulder. I have never seen this before. I am a BC of the Ruthenian Rite. How common is this practice?
It is always done as such in my experience of BCC, Ruthenian, Divine Liturgies when there are two or more con-celebrating priests or two or more con-celebrating deacons. The exchange is done within the "order" only, i.e. priest-- presbyters and bishops-- to priest, deacon to deacon. The people are also a true order by virtue of baptism/chrismation and I believe it would not be improper for the people to also exchange the kiss among themselves, it's just that there is no rubric for it and it is not or non longer the custom. With the people, the mixed gender can be a complication.

So, the kiss would not take place when there is just con-celebrating priest and deacon. At liturgies where there are several con-celebrating priests, especially as is often the case of the bishop and several presbyters, the BCC, Ruthenians (perhaps others too), have a specific choreography to accomplish the task: The presbyters approach the bishop from his left, the first presbyter exchanges the kiss with the bishop and then stands to the bishop's immediate right, the next presbyter exchanges the kiss with the bishop and the first presbyter and then stands to that presbyter's right, and so on. In this way all priests exchange the kiss with each other.

The kiss is at the minimum a stylized embrace. It was (certainly pre-VCII) and still is such in the Latin rite also although the hand shake is now the dominant "sign" in the US.

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What ever became of the masterful translations made by Fr. Joe Shary?

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Originally Posted by jiompkowski
I came across a youtube vid of a DIVINE LITURGY at a conference in Napa Valley. They did the kiss of peace but unlike the Latin Rite it was a kiss on the cheek or shoulder. I have never seen this before. I am a BC of the Ruthenian Rite. How common is this practice?
Peace is shared in this way among the concelebrating priests if there are more than one, and among the deacons if there are more than one.

Originally Posted by Our Lady's slave
This is as it should be done - and it's only done by the clergy.
Having the faithful participate in the Kiss of Peace is not forbidden, and I know that Fr. Schmemann was a big advocate of restoring this practice. The big difference is that it *has* to be done with solemnity and decorum--something we don't often see in current RC practice. (The Maronites, on the other hand, do it beautifully.)


Peace,
Deacon Richard

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It can be done with dignity as it is in the Latin Church in Chevetogne.

There the peace is shared between clergy of the same rank and is then given to the people by two servers - one to each side of the Church.

How is it done ? Very simply - the server comes to the end of each row of pews and places his closed hands between the hands of the first person , who then turns to his neighbour and gives them the peace in the same fashion and so it is spread throughout the Church.

There's none of this rushing about , shaking hands with your friends and family and the folk at the other side of the Church , and waving to those you can't actually get to but can see in the distance.

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Seems like a borrowing from the Syriac Tradition of peace

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Don't know about that - I'm led to believe it's the normal Benedictine way

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Are you certain the video is not showing the triple Paschal kiss at Easter liturgy, which is exchanged among clergy, altar boys and laity, I believe.

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