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I recently visited a Romanian Catholic church and I noticed that a spoon was not used to distribute the Eucharist, which I wasn't expecting.

The Body was cut into thin little "plank" pieces and then dipped into the Blood in the chalice, by intinction.

Is this a Romanian custom that is done in all Romanian Byzantine Catholic churches?

Would one also find the same practice to distribute the Holy Gifts in the Romanian Orthodox churches?

I had thought that only the Maronite church distributed the Eucharist in this manner, so I found this most interesting.

I appreciate everyone's insight - thanks so much! biggrin

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This is also the way the Melkites distribute communion.

God bless.

John

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They do the same with the Italo-Albanians in Italy. I was also quiet shocked. I would not be surprised it the Melchites showed them how to do this.

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Quote
Originally posted by Arystarcus:
Would one also find the same practice to distribute the Holy Gifts in the Romanian Orthodox churches?
No.

But many Romanian Orthodox will use pale wine and white Communion cloths. wink

Dave

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The way you described is the one used at St George Romainian Byzantine Cathedral and is normative.
-Daniel

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Quote
Originally posted by Chtec:


But many Romanian Orthodox will use pale wine and white Communion cloths. wink

Dave
It's funny that you mentioned this, because they also used white wine and white communion cloths at the Romanian Catholic Church too! wink

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I would like to thank everyone for their most informative replies - so thank you! biggrin

However, I have yet another question. wink

Has it always been the practice to communicate without using a spoon in the Romanian Catholic, Melkite and Italo-Albanian Churches? If not, when did it originate?

Does it have something to do with trying to differentiate themselves from the Eastern Orthodox, as they use a spoon to communicate? confused

I seem to recall that according to the canons, a spoon shouldn't be used anyways - so maybe it's just that the Eastern Catholic Churches mentioned above are followin' the rules. :p

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Yes being different and also following everything western as if western was a superior culture is a big problem with Eastern Rite Catholic Churches. You might notice the Romanian bishops in Romania wear the Latin Zuchetto. Bishop John in the USA is the only one who wears the Klobuk. The phase "salvation comes through the French" is not limited to the Middle East by any means. My personal view of the Italo-Albanians is that they had lost so much of their knowledge of the Byzantine Rite they basically had to buy the book (probably written by a Latin) and read it first. I think the truth may be that the Melchites helped them to discover the Rite. A German Byzantine rite priest filled me in regarding the history of the Monastery at Grottaferrata and this sort of explained a lot to me. I was there in 1989 & 1990 and there were some things that were confusing me about the place. Why were the vestments in their museum all old Latin ones. Why were nearly all the paintings of a similar age and they were not old. Something was not right. Why were all the altars in the monastery too close to the wall
so as to prevent anyone walking behind them. so some parts of the church simply lost contact with the Orthodox for one reason or other and others just wanted to impress the Latins that they were Catholics by imitating them, never realising they really did not care.

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My question is, if the Melkites provide The Eucharist via tincturing, is this also the method of The Antiochian Church?

And regarding spoons, it seems all the Orthodox sites that provide items for the Holy Table all include the Lance and Spoon. I am confused now. or again? :-)

Michael

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any info in this? Thanks

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Originally posted by lost&found:
My question is, if the Melkites provide The Eucharist via tincturing, is this also the method of The Antiochian Church?

The Antiochian Orthodox (Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch) use the spoon. (Unless they're Western Rite... wink )

Dave

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We use a spoon, I had no idea people out there did not and this surprises me. Father also uses a lance for the Proskomedia before Orthros.

Andrew

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Dear Andrew and Dave,

Thank you both for your replies. My cantor thought the Melkite Church also used a spoon. If not, I am a bit surprised.

In Christ,

Michael

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St. Joseph's Melkite Church in Akron, OH does not use a spoon, neither does Saint John of the Desert in Phoenix, Az (I don't think).

The Eparchy of Newton website has an article that says that either method is allowed for the Melkites.

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I don't understand why if the Melkites come from the Byzantine tradition they would not use a spoon. Does the priest dip the lamb in wine and then place it in everybody's mouth? How do the prevent the blood from being spilled?

Andrew

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