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I have always thought of Tchaikovsky's Kheruvimskaya (specifically the one from the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom Opus 41) as one of the nearest approximations of heaven that I've ever heard. The Orthodox are justly proud of it.

However, given its difficulty, is it ever sung in actual Divine Liturgies, or does it -- like so much great sacred music -- live on only in the concert hall and in recordings?
I've sung it in Liturgy, but it's a choral piece, so it is sung by the choir. I prefer the Liturgy to be sung congregationally, and for that, plainchant tones sung monadically or with simple folk harmonies are better, and can be quite as beautiful.
My church's choir, which is way too small, often attempts such complex pieces... it usually doesn't work out. The priest has been trying to get them to switch to some simple two-part stuff... hopefully they'll do it at some point.
Originally Posted by StuartK
I've sung it in Liturgy, but it's a choral piece, so it is sung by the choir. I prefer the Liturgy to be sung congregationally, and for that, plainchant tones sung monadically or with simple folk harmonies are better, and can be quite as beautiful.

Stuart

I am just asking if this setting is still sung in actual Divine Liturgies. This thread is not about congregational versus choral singing.
Well, I just told you--I sang it in an actual Divine Liturgy (many times, in fact). But it cannot be sung by a congregation, which is a valid observation. That congregational singing is also the norm is another valid observation.
Originally Posted by StuartK
Well, I just told you--I sang it in an actual Divine Liturgy (many times, in fact)

Church Slavonic or English?
Slavonic. It doesn't really work well in English.
Posted By: John K Re: Tchaikovsky's Kheruvimskaya (from Op. 41) - 09/08/09 11:53 AM
In my former Greek Catholic parish, our choir sang it as well.
It's back on Youtube!!!



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