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Troparion of the Great Pumpkin – Tone 4

O most wonderful Great Pumpkin! * Thou didst promise to travel the earth each year on All Hallow’s Eve to seek out the most sincere pumpkin patch. * And thou didst promise wondrous presents to children over the earth * if they wouldst be good and wait on thee. * This year we ask thee to consider the sincerity of the pumpkin patch of Linus, * for he hast waited patiently upon thee for over forty years. * If thou doth deny our petition to see Linus’ pumpkin patch as truly sincere, * thou might find thyself served up as a pumpkin pie.

ABC-TV - Thursday, October 28, 2010 at 8:00 PM ET.
Is this a Polyeleos-rank feast?
An all-night Vigil is prescribed and is held in a sincere pumpkin patch, so....

PS: It's BYOB (Bring your own blanket).
Just a tad imprecatory...maybe tone 6 would be the better fit.
I think Tone 5.
perhaps it's not a troparion at all but rather a katastrophicon in, say, the 82nd. tone...I've composed a few katastrophica myself but will refrain from inflicting them on forum members since none of them are particularly edifying.
Originally Posted by 70x7
Is this a Polyeleos-rank feast?

It used to be, but it has been squashed.


When selecting vesture for the feast, please keep in mind that bright colors are deemed most appropriate, but dark may be substituted - the application of reflective striping thereto as a safety measure is permitted on the basis that, if its ok with the Amish, we can live with it too.

The carrying of baskets is encouraged however, as use of bags is deemed to represent a latinization.
Thank you, Mr. Administrator! You have warmed my heart. I remember as a child that the lanterns were lit during the singing of that hymn.
Originally Posted by Irish Melkite
... as use of bags is deemed to represent a latinization.
This should not be a worry since it is a feast that spans both East and West: As the Tropar notes it speaks of "each year on All Hallow’s Eve," the vigil of All Saints in the Western church. Nevertheless, being truly ecumenical, it is observed even on both calendars: "Feast of the Great Pumpkin - October 31 / November 13."

The Tropar and, may I say "icon," also illustrate the truth of what a superficial literal reading would reject: that although "Linus, ... hast waited patiently upon thee for over forty years" he is shown as the child that he indeed still is.

In San Antonio every Methodist church lawn is covered with pumpkins this time of year. This is apparently reflective of a particularly strong devotion to the Great Pumpkin. They cleverly disguise this devotion by claiming they are engaged in a fund raising event. `
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It's BYOB


Never heard that interpretation of that acronym. Here I was all set to bring my own "sustenance." grin You know, that stuff that "gladdens the heart of man."

Bob
Bob: It sounds like your "B" blankets the heart of man with the spirit of gladness. In the end, it's the spirit that counts, correct?

As to the proper tone for the troparion, I have not checked all the books but I understand that the Ruthenian books just say "Tone IV". I'm told that the Greek books have it listed as "Samopopinki IV: 'At the festival of pumpkins....'" while the Great Russian books have "Samopopinki IV: "As we gather the sincere pumpkins...." I suspect that the Great Pumpkin himself is flexible on the issue.
I just received a communication from an Old Calendarist follower of the Great Pumpkin. He admitted to taking his children halloweening on the (gasp!) Gregorian Calendar Halloween. That's on October 31st (N.S.).

Perhaps the Great Pumpkin is a new author of grass-roots ecumenism!

Or maybe he is just being thrifty and taking his kids out for double treats, 13 days apart. I hope none dress as "holey ghosts" like Charlie Brown or they'll get only rocks (and he dressed that way only because he had trouble with scissors).

biggrin
Originally Posted by Administrator
Perhaps the Great Pumpkin is a new author of grass-roots ecumenism!
Yes, one day, East and West worshiping together, under a pumpkin dome.

Me thinks that our Administrator was a great fan of Halloween (and the Peanuts gang) as a little boy!!! smile

(--not that I blame him; we, of a certain age range all were!)

***On a serious note; as I see Halloween decorations becoming more and more elaborate (one house near me has two giant spiders climbing the exterior and one giant spider making a web on their front porch--another has a casket on the front lawn which opens intermittently with a vampire sitting up in it), my mom made a good observation the other day--in Europe the children (and adults) get to have this fun, minus the macabre aspect of Halloween, during Carnivale/Apokries time, before the onset of Great Lent. Since that festive, costume donning time does not exist here (except in New Orleans, where it has morphed into a tradition which is anything BUT childlike and/or proper), it is only natural that Halloween would have become so big.
This is hilarious. I have forwarded it to several of my co-workers.
Was Jack Pumpkinhead a precursor of the Great Pumpkin?

Fr. Serge
Originally Posted by Fr Serge Keleher
Was Jack Pumpkinhead a precursor of the Great Pumpkin?

Fr. Serge

No, the precursor of the Great Pumpkin would have been the Dutchman, Linus of Pelt. grin His image is found in the icon for the feast. Now as I understand it, the origin of this feast is found in the apocryphal work, the Gospel according to Peanuts.

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When is the leave-taking of the Feast of the "Great" Pumpkin?

Originally Posted by 70x7
When is the leave-taking of the Feast of the "Great" Pumpkin?

Ray,

I may be mistaken, but I think it happened at Walmart, about midnight last night, when preparations began for the Pilgrim-age in honor of the Wild Turkey [upload.wikimedia.org], some three and a half weeks hence.

Many years,

Neil
I thought Wal-Mart followed the new calendar according to Sam, which starts the pre-feast of the Nativity on Labor Day in September? The only fast day is the Friday after Thanksgiving when we are supposed to purge ourselves of all our funds as a sacrificial offering. shocked
At the rate retailers are rushing the seasons these days I think it is only a matter of time before we see a leprechaun in a Santa suit some time in early February. Maybe this will ultimately solve the calendar dispute. We will have no calendar and everyone will celebrate whatever they want whenever they want as per personal revelation.
Originally Posted by Secret Squirrel
... the new calendar according to Sam, which starts the pre-feast of the Nativity on Labor Day in September.
Labor Day is of course a movable holiday in the Fiscal cycle. That Fiscalion has an accumulating bias, and the pre-season that used to started the day after Thanksgiving has now, unfortunately, deteriorated to beginning even on Labor day as noted.
Originally Posted by JimG
it is only a matter of time before we see a leprechaun in a Santa suit some time in early February.

Of course, Jim, it must be noted that St Nicholas was actually of Irish ethnicity, an often-overlooked fact. However, not everyone realizes that the 'elves' who are associated with him in his alter ego of Santa Claus were, in actuality, the little people. It was very good of you to remind us of this biggrin

Many years,

Neil
Originally Posted by Secret Squirrel
I thought Wal-Mart followed the new calendar according to Sam, which starts the pre-feast of the Nativity on Labor Day in September? The only fast day is the Friday after Thanksgiving when we are supposed to purge ourselves of all our funds as a sacrificial offering. shocked

The squirrel is, as always, on target. And a shame it is that the intervening feasts are often lost in this. October 12, for instance, Colombo Day - on which pilgrimages were made to the edge of the ocean and the faithful looked eastward, hoping for a glimpse of the trench-coated sailor.
Originally Posted by Irish Melkite
Originally Posted by Secret Squirrel
I thought Wal-Mart followed the new calendar according to Sam, which starts the pre-feast of the Nativity on Labor Day in September? The only fast day is the Friday after Thanksgiving when we are supposed to purge ourselves of all our funds as a sacrificial offering. shocked

The squirrel is, as always, on target. And a shame it is that the intervening feasts are often lost in this. October 12, for instance, Colombo Day - on which pilgrimages were made to the edge of the ocean and the faithful looked eastward, hoping for a glimpse of the trench-coated sailor.
I thought Colombo Day was driving around in a worn out car repeating the phrase, "Sir, just one more question..." in imitation of that great saint detective, who always eluded to the never to be seen Mrs Colombo? crazy
Originally Posted by Irish Melkite
Originally Posted by JimG
it is only a matter of time before we see a leprechaun in a Santa suit some time in early February.

Of course, Jim, it must be noted that St Nicholas was actually of Irish ethnicity, an often-overlooked fact. However, not everyone realizes that the 'elves' who are associated with him in his alter ego of Santa Claus were, in actuality, the little people. It was very good of you to remind us of this biggrin

Many years,

Neil
My guess is after a bottle or two of the sainted Wild Turkey, everything becomes of Irish origin. biggrin
Originally Posted by Deacon John Montalvo
... Now as I understand it, the origin of this feast is found in the apocryphal work, the Gospel according to Peanuts.
Sigh. It is those who describe the Gospel according to Peanuts as "apocryphal" who cause the Great Pumpkin to skip many sincere pumpkin patches. Remember that Linus annually gets bypassed simply because he uses the words "if he comes".
Originally Posted by ajk
Originally Posted by Secret Squirrel
... the new calendar according to Sam, which starts the pre-feast of the Nativity on Labor Day in September.
Labor Day is of course a movable holiday in the Fiscal cycle. That Fiscalion has an accumulating bias, and the pre-season that used to started the day after Thanksgiving has now, unfortunately, deteriorated to beginning even on Labor day as noted.
One must properly consider the calendar and its effects. There are no differences between the Gregorian Calendar and the Julian Calendar, save those pesky 13 days. The Feast of the Great Pumpkin has one pre-festive day and the usual octave of post-festive days. The problem comes with the Revised Gregorian Calendar (which is called "Sam's Calendar" in some parts of the country). It has determined that you can't rush into a feast of this rank without an extended pre-feast. But is also has been determined that there are no post-festive days at all because the pre-festive periods of Thanksgiving and the Christmas out rank the post-festive days of Pumpkin and therefore suppress it.

The Revised Gregorian Calendar (aka the "Revised New Calendar" and "Sam's Calendar") now prescribes:

Labor Day until the Feast of the Great Pumpkin:
--Pre-Festive Days of the Great Pumpkin
--Pre-Pre-Festive Days of Thanksgiving
--Pre-Pre-Pre-Festive Days of Christmas

October 31
--Feast of the Great Pumpkin

November 1 through the Wednesday Before the Fourth Thursday of November:
--Pre-Festive Days of Thanksgivng
--Pre-Pre-Festive Days of Christmas

Forth Thursday of November
--Thanksgiving Day

Thanksgiving Day through November 30
--Pre-Festive Days of Christmas

December 1-25
--Christmas Month

December 26-31
--Post-Festive Days of Christmas (aka "Throw Out the Tree Week")

January 1st
--College Bowl Day and New Year's Day

Now there is some confusion among those following the Julian Calendar about the date of Thanksgiving Day. Some follow the traditional Julian Calendar and place Thanksgiving Day on the 4th Thursday of "Julian" November (this year it would fall on Gregorian December 9th). This, of course, plays havoc with the pre and post-festive periods (are they calculated using the traditional Julian Calendar or the New Revised Gregorian Calendar). And there are those who celebrate according to both calendars.

Now that I've written all that I hope it is clear. If not, please ask Neil to pass you the bottle of Wild Turkey (yes, it is the customary drink for Thanksgiving Day but I'm sure no one will care if we start the pre-festive toasts a bit early).
I have heard talk that the octave of the Feast of the Great Pumpkin is a Lutheranization. Can anyone correlate this?
Originally Posted by John K
I have heard talk that the octave of the Feast of the Great Pumpkin is a Lutheranization. Can anyone correlate this?
Indeed, Oct 31 is Protestantism's Reformation Day on which Luther is held by some to have posted his 95 Theses:
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According to a report written by Philipp Melanchthon, Luther posted the Ninety-Five Theses at the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany on October 31, 1517. Some scholars have questioned the accuracy of this account, noting that no contemporaneous evidence exists for it.[2] Others have countered that no such evidence is necessary, because this action was the customary way of advertising an event on a university campus.[3] Church doors at the time functioned very much as bulletin boards. Still others suggest the posting may well have happened sometime in November 1517. When referring to the 95 Theses, it is nevertheless quite safe to say that they were posted on October 31, 1517, on a church door. The day of October 31 is All Hallow's Eve, and, since on the following day (All Saints) most people will go to church, posting his theses on this day makes sense.[3]
link [en.wikipedia.org]

For some strange reason, The Great Pumpkin is not mentioned in these accounts.

BTW, in our domestic church we have already observed a leave-taking of some lesser pumpkins and the subsequent seasonal eating of pumpkin muffins.
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Indeed, Oct 31 is Protestantism's Reformation Day on which Luther is held by some to have posted his 95 Theses

If only the bishop had just given Marty some M&Ms or a Mars Bar. How history would have changed.
Originally Posted by ajk
Indeed, Oct 31 is Protestantism's Reformation Day on which Luther is held by some to have posted his 95 Theses:
Quote
According to a report written by Philipp Melanchthon, Luther posted the Ninety-Five Theses at the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany on October 31, 1517. Some scholars have questioned the accuracy of this account, noting that no contemporaneous evidence exists for it.[2] Others have countered that no such evidence is necessary, because this action was the customary way of advertising an event on a university campus.[3] Church doors at the time functioned very much as bulletin boards. Still others suggest the posting may well have happened sometime in November 1517. When referring to the 95 Theses, it is nevertheless quite safe to say that they were posted on October 31, 1517, on a church door. The day of October 31 is All Hallow's Eve, and, since on the following day (All Saints) most people will go to church, posting his theses on this day makes sense.[3]

As the resident Lutheran; let me clarify that the reason for posting the Theses on the door of the castle church on the Eve of All Hallow's had much to do with the fact that the monarch had a vast collection of sacred relics, which he would make available for public veneration annually at All Saint's Day.

Many of the relics had various indulgences connected with their veneration. The faithful would come to the castle church for this once-a-year display; obtaining indulgences would be very much on their minds. Therefore, posting an invitation to debate indulgences and the sale thereof was very well timed.
Originally Posted by ajk
That Fiscalion has an accumulating bias, and the pre-season that used to started the day after Thanksgiving has now, unfortunately, deteriorated to beginning even on Labor day as noted.

This may be resolved by proposals before the commissioner and the owners to move two games from the pre-season to the regular season . . .
Originally Posted by ajk
Originally Posted by John K
I have heard talk that the octave of the Feast of the Great Pumpkin is a Lutheranization. Can anyone correlate this?

. . .

For some strange reason, The Great Pumpkin is not mentioned in these accounts.

Further evidence the date is correct.

Just as Luther dismissed St. James, we shall dismiss this omission!

smile
One learns something frequently. I was under the impression that BYOB was part of an invitation to a fundamentalist prayer-meeting and means "Bring Your Own Bible"
Originally Posted by Thomas the Seeker
As the resident Lutheran; let me clarify that the reason for posting the Theses on the door of the castle church on the Eve of All Hallow's had much to do with the fact that the monarch had a vast collection of sacred relics, which he would make available for public veneration annually at All Saint's Day.

Many of the relics had various indulgences connected with their veneration. The faithful would come to the castle church for this once-a-year display; obtaining indulgences would be very much on their minds. Therefore, posting an invitation to debate indulgences and the sale thereof was very well timed.
I suppose some scholarly research would determine that there is an indulgence of sorts associated with waiting in sincere pumpkin patches on Halloween. I'm not sure I really want to know the details, but I'm guessing that Linus has racked up the more indulgences than any other sincere pumpkin patch sitter? I'm not sure about Sally. Was she waiting sincerely for the Great Pumpkin or was she just chasing after her great "Baboo"?

Neil, I really could use some of that wild turkey at this point....
Originally Posted by ajk
Originally Posted by John K
I have heard talk that the octave of the Feast of the Great Pumpkin is a Lutheranization. Can anyone correlate this?
Indeed, Oct 31 is Protestantism's Reformation Day on which Luther is held by some to have posted his 95 Theses:
...

For some strange reason, The Great Pumpkin is not mentioned in these accounts.
Originally Posted by Thomas the Seeker
As the resident Lutheran; let me clarify that the reason for posting the Theses on the door of the castle church on the Eve of All Hallow's had much to do with the fact that the monarch had a vast collection of sacred relics, which he would make available for public veneration annually at All Saint's Day.

Many of the relics had various indulgences connected with their veneration. The faithful would come to the castle church for this once-a-year display; obtaining indulgences would be very much on their minds. Therefore, posting an invitation to debate indulgences and the sale thereof was very well timed.
Originally Posted by Administrator
I suppose some scholarly research would determine...

Neil, I really could use some of that wild turkey at this point....

"Scholarly research" -- perhaps conjecture. Let me see: a very curious silence about the Great Pumpkin, AND YET, "...castle church on the Eve of All Hallow's ...monarch had a vast collection of sacred relics, ... available for public veneration ... various indulgences connected with their veneration... once-a-year display... " Could it be the castle church contained -- contains (?)... dare I even think it...my hand trembles, I can not continue
haha Irish Melkite
Originally Posted by ajk
Could it be the castle church contained -- contains (?)... dare I even think it...my hand trembles, I can not continue

...the world's most sincere pumpkin patch in the courtyard?
And now for something completely...theological.

This circulated by email a few years ago:

A woman was asked by a coworker, "What is it like to be a Christian?"

The coworker replied, "It is like being a pumpkin." God picks you from the patch, brings you in, and washes all the dirt off of you. Then He cuts off the top and scoops out all the yucky stuff.

He removes the seeds of doubt, hate, and greed. Then He carves you a new smiling face and puts His light inside of you to shine for all the world to see."
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He removes the seeds of doubt, hate, and greed. Then He carves you a new smiling face and puts His light inside of you to shine for all the world to see."

Dear Pastor Thomas,

This was really nice...thanks for sharing it!

In Christ,
Alice
Originally Posted by ajk
..."Scholarly research" -- perhaps conjecture. Let me see: a very curious silence about the Great Pumpkin, AND YET, "...castle church on the Eve of All Hallow's ...monarch had a vast collection of sacred relics, ... available for public veneration ... various indulgences connected with their veneration... once-a-year display... " Could it be the castle church contained -- contains (?)... dare I even think it...my hand trembles, I can not continue
Could it be that not only did he find the Great Pumpkin in the courtyard but also the bottle of Wild Turkey? biggrin
Originally Posted by Alice
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He removes the seeds of doubt, hate, and greed. Then He carves you a new smiling face and puts His light inside of you to shine for all the world to see."

Dear Pastor Thomas,

This was really nice...thanks for sharing it!

In Christ,
Alice

Thank you.

I rarely use email circulars as the starting point for homilies but I did make an exception with this one a few years ago...great illustration of the sola gratia, sola Christe principles of the Reformation.

Most might be unaware that Lutherans celebrate the final Sunday of October as "Reformation Sunday" with the texts Jeremiah 31:31-34; Romans 3:21-28; and John 8:31-36. It is our equivilant of "Orthodoxy Sunday".
Best wishes to all those celebrating Halloween tonight, according to the Julian Calendar. May the Great Pumpkin find your pumpkin patch to be the very sincerest! May you never find a rock at the bottom of your basket of treats!



S'Praznikom!
Winter Warlock Threatens Great Pumpkin!

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[Weather.com] - The Winter Warlock is threatening sincere pumpkin patches across North America this week as pumpkin lovers from coast to coast prepare to spend Monday night in their backyard pumpkin patches, in the hopes that the Great Pumpkin will judge it the sincerest and leave lots of goodies.

The Rocky Mountain areas from Colorado to Alberta received up to two feet of the white stuff from Mr. Warlock earlier in the week and on Saturday pumpkin patches from Virginia to Maine will be challenged with snowfall amounts from a dusting to a foot. Weather satellites indicate that the Winter Warlock has returned from his summer hiatus and is already blanketing the North Pole with record snows. Unnamed sources state that the National Security Agency has information that the Winter Warlock has a longstanding feud with the Great Pumpkin, but representatives of both have issued statements denying any feud and indicate seasonal friendship and mutual respect. Kris Kringle and Rudolf the Red Nosed Reindeer could not be reached for comment. Linus, however, held a press conference today in which he stated that he firmly believes that this year his pumpkin patch will be judged the sincerest. (He has also promised to teach Charlie Brown how to use scissors.)

Churches across North America are facing a typicon challenge as the fixed Feast of the Great Pumpkin almost never coincides with the movable feast of the First Appearance of the Winter Warlock. Russian Church officials insist that both canons must be read. Greek Church officials indicate that you take both troparia but can take either canon, or take an abbreviated canon. Ruthenian officials have abbreviated the Vigil to take only the Litija Procession to the Pumpkin Patch and the singing of Pumpkin Carols. All traditions call for a total fast from any food made with pumpkins on this day.

Pumpkin Patch campers are strongly advised to dress warmly on Monday night as they keep the all-night vigil in their pumpkin patches waiting for the Great Pumpkin as temperatures fall below freezing. Those planning to use snow-blowers to clean off the pumpkins so that they can be seen by the Great Pumpkin as he flies by are urged to do safely, and not to in any way harm a pumpkin.
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