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#43546 11/09/05 06:15 AM
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What translation of Holy Scriptures do you prefer?


Chyde
#43547 11/09/05 02:44 PM
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The R.S.V.

#43548 11/09/05 03:41 PM
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Nestle, but I don't read Greek very well.

CDL

#43549 11/09/05 04:10 PM
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Quote
Originally posted by seminarian@mtangel:
What translation of Holy Scriptures do you prefer?
In English, the North American Bible, because it is the version used for the Liturgy.

I also like the Jerusalem Bible in Spanish, so I assume it is equally good in English.

Shalom,
Memo

#43550 11/09/05 07:07 PM
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The complete RSV (Imprimatur of Richard Cardinal Cushing) is available on line, free! try salvationhistory.com
and fish around a bit. It's there, and useful.

Incognitus

#43551 11/09/05 07:48 PM
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A very useful site, containing the RSV text.

http://etext.virginia.edu/rsv.browse.html

#43552 11/09/05 09:39 PM
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Dear Father Elias,

Thank you!

Incognitus

#43553 11/10/05 03:14 PM
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Actually, I prefer reading my Bible in Ukrainian.

No offense to the liturgical language of the Byzantine Catholic Church, but I like using a language that is not the one I use 99% of the time. Something more special about it. In addition, I find it more beautiful.

I have an Orthodox and the Basilian translation of the Bible, but am getting the official Ukrainian Orthodox Bible from Ukraine soon.

Alex

#43554 11/26/05 08:50 PM
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For those of you who would like something in English, Catholic, and not modern, could I recommend the Douai/Rheims translation with Archbishop Challoner's notes.

Douai/Rheims was the translation of the Bible made for Catholics during the persecutions of the early 17th Century. Archbishop Challoner updated it in the middle of the 18th Century.

Imagine a Catholic version of the King James version.

My first post on this group, though I have lurked for a while: my very best wishes to you all.


Paciencia y barajar
#43555 11/28/05 01:09 AM
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My preference is for that said Douay-Rheims translation with Card. Challoner.

In Christ,
Adam

#43556 11/28/05 05:03 AM
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Could someone point me toward a list of the major differences between the Douay/Reims and the NAS -- I don't mean the general differences, I mean the significant phrases over which there is a reasonable dispute of interpretation. If there is such a collection of citations. Maybe I am asking for the moon -- I don't know. I like the idea of the Scriptures in a poetic form of English, but if it would be so archaic that it would seriously compromise clarity...

On a funny/sad note, my husband who was raised a cradle Catholic hung on to a copy of the KJV that a friend had given him in high school until we were going through preparations for our marriage. He hadn't realized that the KJV was a Protestant Bible! When I got him a nice new leather NAS, he had a hard time adjusting to it because he was used to the pretty language of the KJV, but our priest helped him see that some of the verses in the KJV had been translated in a way that doesn't really fit with Church teaching.

We have an anniversary coming up in a few months, and if the Douay/Reims is very poetic, that might be a nice gift for me to give him.

#43557 11/28/05 08:25 PM
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The best I can do is [URL=http://www.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/Scriptures/DRB.htm][/URL] which gives a couple of examples of the sort of language used, but doesn't really do justice to the majesty of the English used.

Please let me know if you want me to look further.


Paciencia y barajar
#43558 11/29/05 04:03 AM
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Originally posted by pooklaroux:
We have an anniversary coming up in a few months, and if the Douay/Reims is very poetic, that might be a nice gift for me to give him.
I really, really love old English and I grew up with the KJV (I'm a convert) so Douay-Rheims is one of my favourite translations. It is a good version to have if you want poetic but your husband will need to be comfortable with reading old English. However, the present version of the Douay-Rheims (revision courtesy of Bishop Challoner) has updated some of the language to 1700s English to make it easier to understand.

The greatest benefit of the Douay-Rheims is how close it is to the Latin Vulgate of St. Jerome. I'd trust this version before the KJV! Besides, the KJV is missing books so it doesn't really count, no matter how pretty it sounds.

Something that could be confusing about the Douay-Rheims is that the OT is numbered a little differently and some of the books also have different names.

For example:
The 23 Psalm (The Lord is my Shepherd...) is actually 22 Psalm in Douay-Rheims and reads:

Quote
"The Lord ruleth me: and I shall want nothing. He hath set me in a place of pasture. He hath brought me up, on the water of refreshment: he hath converted my soul. He hath led me on the paths of justice, for his own name's sake. For though I should walk in the midst of the shadow of death, I will fear no evils, for thou art with me. Thy rod and thy staff, they have comforted me. Thou hast prepared a table before me against them that afflict me. Thou hast annointed my head with oil; and my chalice which inebriateth me, how goodly it is! And thy mercy will follow me all the days of my life. And that I may dwell in the house of the Lord unto length of days."
As for different names, Chronicles I and II are in Douay-Reims as Paralipomenon I and II. There are a few books with different names but your husband can just make a note to cross-reference or use Bible tabs like I do, which REALLY helps.

I hope all of this will be of some assistance to you.

In Christ, Michelle


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